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H.R. 4196 (114th): Trade Enforcement Improvement Act of 2015


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The summary below was written by the Congressional Research Service, which is a nonpartisan division of the Library of Congress, and was published on Dec 9, 2015.


Trade Enforcement Improvement Act of 2015

This bill amends the Tariff Act of 1930 to direct the U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC) to consider expanded factors when determining whether imports of merchandise receiving a countervailable subsidy from an exporting country substantially weaken the remedial effect of any countervailing duty order. These factors shall include:

an increase in the U.S. market share of those imports after the filing by domestic manufacturers or unions of a petition for remedies, an increase in underselling of the domestic like product by the frequency or magnitude of such imports after the filing of the petition, and a weakening of the industry of the domestic like product after the petition filing. The ITC shall consider the same expanded factors when determining whether imports of merchandise at less than fair value substantially weaken the remedial effect of any antidumping duty order.

The ITC may determine that a U.S. industry is threatened with material injury if imminent future imports of subject merchandise will likely render the industry's performance materially worse than it would otherwise have been.

The Department of Homeland Security may publish semiannually in the Federal Register a list of any producer, manufacturer, supplier, seller, exporter, or other person located outside the U.S. customs territory to which the ITC has issued a penalty claim for customs violations involving fraud.

These violations include any practices aiding or abetting the transshipment, through a country not the country of origin, of textile, apparel, or any goods subject to antidumping or countervailing duty orders, in a manner concealing their true origin or permitting evasion of import quotas or duties.

The President may publish an annual list of countries:

in which illegal activities have occurred involving transshipped goods or activities designed to evade U.S. quotas or duties; and whose governments fail to demonstrate a good faith effort to cooperate with U.S. authorities in halting such activities.