skip to main content

H.R. 596 (114th): To repeal the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and health care-related provisions in the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010, and for other purposes.


The text of the bill below is as of Jan 28, 2015 (Introduced).

Summary of this bill

H.R. 596 would repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA), the 2010 law that implemented President Obama’s healthcare reforms. The bill would direct the committees of the House of Representatives to begin the process of proposing alternative reforms. The House passed the bill on February 3, 2014, sending it to the Senate. There have been many previous bills that have attempted to repeal the ACA, none have succeeded.

The ACA created the “individual mandate,” a tax penalty for not holding qualified health insurance, and subsidies for low-income Americans to purchase health insurance. It also created the “employer mandate,” a tax penalty for employers with 50 or more full-time employees ...


I

114th CONGRESS

1st Session

H. R. 596

IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

January 28, 2015

introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on Energy and Commerce, and in addition to the Committees on Education and the Workforce, Ways and Means, the Judiciary, Natural Resources, Rules, House Administration, Appropriations, and the Budget, for a period to be subsequently determined by the Speaker, in each case for consideration of such provisions as fall within the jurisdiction of the committee concerned

A BILL

To repeal the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and health care-related provisions in the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010, and for other purposes.

1.

Repeal of PPACA and health care-related provisions in the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010

(a)

PPACA

Effective as of the enactment of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (Public Law 111–148), such Act is repealed, and the provisions of law amended or repealed by such Act are restored or revived as if such Act had not been enacted.

(b)

Health care-Related provisions in the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010

Effective as of the enactment of the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (Public Law 111–152), title I and subtitle B of title II of such Act are repealed, and the provisions of law amended or repealed by such title or subtitle, respectively, are restored or revived as if such title and subtitle had not been enacted.

2.

Budgetary effects of this Act

The budgetary effects of this Act, for the purpose of complying with the Statutory Pay-As-You-Go Act of 2010, shall be determined by reference to the latest statement titled Budgetary Effects of PAYGO Legislation for this Act, submitted for printing in the Congressional Record by the Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the House of Representatives, as long as such statement has been submitted prior to the vote on passage of this Act.

3.

Reporting replacement legislation

The Committee on Education and the Workforce, the Committee on Energy and Commerce, the Committee on the Judiciary, and the Committee on Ways and Means of the House of Representatives shall each report to the House of Representatives legislation proposing changes to existing law within each committee’s jurisdiction with provisions that—

(1)

foster economic growth and private sector job creation by eliminating job-killing policies and regulations;

(2)

lower health care premiums through increased competition and choice;

(3)

preserve a patient’s ability to keep his or her health plan if he or she likes it;

(4)

provide people with pre-existing conditions access to affordable health coverage;

(5)

reform the medical liability system to reduce unnecessary and wasteful health care spending;

(6)

increase the number of insured Americans;

(7)

protect the doctor-patient relationship;

(8)

provide the States greater flexibility to administer Medicaid programs;

(9)

expand incentives to encourage personal responsibility for health care coverage and costs;

(10)

prohibit taxpayer funding of abortions and provide conscience protections for health care providers;

(11)

eliminate duplicative government programs and wasteful spending; or

(12)

do not accelerate the insolvency of entitlement programs or increase the tax burden on Americans.