H.R. 6: 21st Century Cures Act

The 21st Century Cures Act is a bipartisan bill that would reform the current standards and appropriations for biomedical research, provide $1.75 billion annually for the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and $110 million for the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This funding would end after five years. Support for this funding would come from budget offsets. Along with ...

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Overview

Introduced:

May 19, 2015

Status:

Passed House on Jul 10, 2015

This bill passed in the House on July 10, 2015 and goes to the Senate next for consideration.

Sponsor:

Fred Upton

Representative for Michigan's 6th congressional district

Republican

Text:

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Last Updated: Jul 13, 2015
Length: 362 pages

Prognosis:

41% chance of being enacted according to PredictGov (details)

See Instead:

H.R. 34 (same title)
Passed House & Senate — Dec 7, 2016

History

May 19, 2015
 
Introduced

This is the first step in the legislative process.

May 21, 2015
 
Reported by Committee

A committee has issued a report to the full chamber recommending that the bill be considered further. Only about 1 in 4 bills are reported out of committee.

Jul 10, 2015
 
Passed House

The bill was passed in a vote in the House. It goes to the Senate next.

 
Passed Senate

 
Signed by the President

H.R. 6 is a bill in the United States Congress.

A bill must be passed by both the House and Senate in identical form and then be signed by the President to become law.

How to cite this information.

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“H.R. 6 — 114th Congress: 21st Century Cures Act.” www.GovTrack.us. 2015. December 8, 2016 <https://www.govtrack.us/congress/bills/114/hr6>

Where is this information from?

GovTrack automatically collects legislative information from a variety of governmental and non-governmental sources. This page is sourced primarily from Congress.gov, the official portal of the United States Congress. Congress.gov is generally updated one day after events occur, and so legislative activity shown here may be one day behind. Data via the congress project.