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H.R. 449 (115th): Synthetic Drug Awareness Act of 2018


The text of the bill below is as of Jun 13, 2018 (Referred to Senate Committee). The bill was not enacted into law.

Summary of this bill

Source: Republican Policy Committee

H.R. 449 requires the U.S. Surgeon General to report to Congress on the public health effects of the rise in synthetic drug use among youth aged 12 to 18 years old in order to further educate parents and the medical community on the health effects of synthetics.

Synthetic drugs, as opposed to natural drugs, are chemically produced in a laboratory.  When produced clandestinely, they are not typically controlled pharmaceutical substances intended for legitimate medical use and contain slightly modified molecular structures of illegal or controlled substances in order to circumvent existing drug laws. Examples include synthetic cannabinoids (Spice, K2), cathinones (Bath Salts), psychedelic phenethylamines (N-Bomb), and fentanyl. Government ...


IIB

115th CONGRESS

2d Session

H. R. 449

IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES

June 13, 2018

Received; read twice and referred to the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions

AN ACT

To require the Surgeon General of the Public Health Service to submit to Congress a report on the health effects of new psychoactive substances (including synthetic drugs) use.

1.

Short title

This Act may be cited as the Synthetic Drug Awareness Act of 2018.

2.

Report on effects on public health of synthetic drug use

(a)

In general

Not later than 3 years after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Surgeon General of the Public Health Service shall submit to Congress a report on the health effects of new psychoactive substances (including synthetic drugs) used since January 2010 by persons who are at least 12 years of age but no more than 18 years of age.

(b)

New psychoactive substance defined

For purposes of subsection (a), the term new psychoactive substance means a controlled substance analogue (as defined in section 102(32) of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 802(32)).

Passed the House of Representatives June 12, 2018.

Karen L. Haas,

Clerk.