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H.R. 4779: REFER Act of 2018

About the bill

Should the federal government be able to interfere with state-level legal marijuana? Attorney General Jeff Sessions says yes, but this bipartisan bill could stop him.

Context

When Colorado and Washington first legalized marijuana in 2012, the drug remained illegal on a federal level, as it still does today. So, should the federal government go after states which legalized the drug, or not? Under the Obama Administration, the Department of Justice decided in 2013 to have state-level U.S. attorneys largely refrain from prosecution.

Today, eight states plus the District of ...

Sponsor and status

Barbara Lee

Sponsor. Representative for California's 13th congressional district. Democrat.

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Last Updated: Jan 11, 2018
Length: 3 pages
Introduced:

Jan 11, 2018

Status:

Introduced on Jan 11, 2018

This bill is in the first stage of the legislative process. It was introduced into Congress on January 11, 2018. It will typically be considered by committee next before it is possibly sent on to the House or Senate as a whole.

Prognosis:

3% chance of being enacted according to Skopos Labs (details)

History

Jan 11, 2018
 
Introduced

Bills and resolutions are referred to committees which debate the bill before possibly sending it on to the whole chamber.

Pending
 
Ordered Reported

Pending
 
Passed House (Senate next)

Pending
 
Passed Senate

Pending
 
Signed by the President

H.R. 4779 is a bill in the United States Congress.

A bill must be passed by both the House and Senate in identical form and then be signed by the President to become law.

How to cite this information.

We recommend the following MLA-formatted citation when using the information you see here in academic work:

“H.R. 4779 — 115th Congress: REFER Act of 2018.” www.GovTrack.us. 2018. June 25, 2018 <https://www.govtrack.us/congress/bills/115/hr4779>

Where is this information from?

GovTrack automatically collects legislative information from a variety of governmental and non-governmental sources. This page is sourced primarily from Congress.gov, the official portal of the United States Congress. Congress.gov is generally updated one day after events occur, and so legislative activity shown here may be one day behind. Data via the congress project.