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H.R. 505 (115th): Border Security Technology Accountability Act of 2017


H.R. 505 requires the Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to ensure that each border security technology acquisition program with an expected lifecycle cost of at least $300 million have an acquisition program baseline approved by the relevant acquisition decision authority.

The bill also requires the Secretary to document that each such program is meeting cost, schedule, and performance thresholds as specified in its baseline and complies with departmental acquisition policies and the Federal Acquisition Regulation, and have a plan for meeting program implementation objectives by managing contractor performance.

The bill also requires the DHS Under Secretary for Management to work with the Commissioner of the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to implement internal control standards and best practices for such programs as identified by the Comptroller General.

H.R. 505 further requires the Under Secretary for Management and the CBP Commissioner to develop and submit to Congress a plan for the testing and evaluation of border security technologies, as well as for the use of independent verification and validation resources.

The bill requires authorized activities to be carried out using existing funds.

Last updated Mar 18, 2017. Source: Republican Policy Committee

The summary below was written by the Congressional Research Service, which is a nonpartisan division of the Library of Congress, and was published on Jan 31, 2017.


Border Security Technology Accountability Act of 2017

(Sec. 2) This bill amends the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to require the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to: (1) ensure that each border security technology acquisition program that is determined to be a major acquisition program has an acquisition program baseline approved by the relevant acquisition decision authority; (2) document that each such program is meeting the cost, schedule, and performance thresholds specified in such baseline in compliance with relevant departmental acquisition policies and the Federal Acquisition Regulation; and (3) have a plan for each such program to meet program implementation objectives by managing contractor performance. "Major acquisition program" means a DHS acquisition program that is estimated by DHS to require an eventual total expenditure of at least $300 million over its life cycle cost.

DHS must ensure that border security technology acquisition program managers adhere to relevant internal control standards identified by the Government Accountability Office.

DHS shall submit a plan for testing and evaluation, as well as for the use of independent verification and validation resources, for border security technology so that new border security technologies are evaluated through a series of assessments, processes, and audits to ensure compliance with relevant departmental acquisition policies and the Federal Acquisition Regulation and the effectiveness of taxpayer dollars.