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H.R. 5483 (115th): Special Registration for Telemedicine Clarification Act of 2018

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About the bill

Source: Republican Policy Committee

H.R. 5483 directs the Department of Justice (DOJ) to issue regulations to improve the flexibility in the practice of telemedicine (for remote diagnosis and treatment of patients) within one year of the bill’s enactment. Specifically, the bill requires DOJ to allow for the prescription of medication-assisted treatment (MAT) and other controlled substances via telemedicine. It requires a special registration to connect patients with the treatment they need without risking important safeguards to prevent misuse.

In 2008, Congress strengthened prohibitions against distributing and dispensing controlled substances by passing the Ryan Haight Online Pharmacy Consumer Protection Act (P.L. 110-425). The Ryan Haight Act made it illegal for a practitioner to dispense controlled substances through the internet without at least one in-person patient evaluation. The legislation included the ability for ...

Sponsor and status

Earl “Buddy” Carter

Sponsor. Representative for Georgia's 1st congressional district. Republican.

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Last Updated: Jun 13, 2018
Length: 2 pages
Introduced
Apr 12, 2018
115th Congress (2017–2019)
Status
Died in a previous Congress

This bill was introduced in a previous session of Congress and was passed by the House on June 12, 2018 but was never passed by the Senate.

Although this bill was not enacted, its provisions could have become law by being included in another bill. It is common for legislative text to be introduced concurrently in multiple bills (called companion bills), re-introduced in subsequent sessions of Congress in new bills, or added to larger bills (sometimes called omnibus bills).

Cosponsors

11 Cosponsors (6 Republicans, 5 Democrats)

Source

Position statements

What legislators are saying

Greg Walden shepherds 25 bills through House of Representatives to combat nationwide opioid crisis
    — Rep. Greg Walden [R-OR2, 1999-2020] (Co-sponsor) on Jun 12, 2018

Donovan, House Pass 35 Bills to Combat the Opioid Crisis
    — Rep. Daniel Donovan [R-NY11, 2015-2018] on Jun 14, 2018

Bacon Joins House Colleagues to Pass 35 Bipartisan Opioid Crisis-Related Legislation
    — Rep. Don Bacon [R-NE2] on Jun 15, 2018

More statements at ProPublica Represent...

History

Apr 12, 2018
 
Introduced

Bills and resolutions are referred to committees which debate the bill before possibly sending it on to the whole chamber.

Apr 25, 2018
 
Considered by Health

A committee held a hearing or business meeting about the bill.

May 9, 2018
 
Ordered Reported

A committee has voted to issue a report to the full chamber recommending that the bill be considered further. Only about 1 in 4 bills are reported out of committee.

Jun 12, 2018
 
Passed House (Senate next)

The bill was passed in a vote in the House. It goes to the Senate next. The vote was by voice vote so no record of individual votes was made.

H.R. 5483 (115th) was a bill in the United States Congress.

A bill must be passed by both the House and Senate in identical form and then be signed by the President to become law.

Bills numbers restart every two years. That means there are other bills with the number H.R. 5483. This is the one from the 115th Congress.

This bill was introduced in the 115th Congress, which met from Jan 3, 2017 to Jan 3, 2019. Legislation not passed by the end of a Congress is cleared from the books.

How to cite this information.

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“H.R. 5483 — 115th Congress: Special Registration for Telemedicine Clarification Act of 2018.” www.GovTrack.us. 2018. September 17, 2021 <https://www.govtrack.us/congress/bills/115/hr5483>

Where is this information from?

GovTrack automatically collects legislative information from a variety of governmental and non-governmental sources. This page is sourced primarily from Congress.gov, the official portal of the United States Congress. Congress.gov is generally updated one day after events occur, and so legislative activity shown here may be one day behind. Data via the congress project.