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H.R. 5884: Mayor Libby Schaaf Act of 2018

About the bill

Should local officials, like mayors, be able to tip off residents of approaching immigration raids by federal law enforcement?

Context

In February, Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf warned that an Immigrations and Customs Enforcement (ICE) raid would take place within 24 hours.

ICE director Thomas Homan estimated that 800 “criminal aliens” were successfully able to avoid capture as a result of the Democratic mayor’s actions even though about 150 arrests were made anyway.

(There’s no evidence that 800 people actually got away, and an ICE spokesperson actually quit rather ...

Sponsor and status

Steve King

Sponsor. Representative for Iowa's 4th congressional district. Republican.

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Last Updated: May 18, 2018
Length: 3 pages
Introduced:

May 18, 2018

Status:

Introduced on May 18, 2018

This bill is in the first stage of the legislative process. It was introduced into Congress on May 18, 2018. It will typically be considered by committee next before it is possibly sent on to the House or Senate as a whole.

Prognosis:

17% chance of being enacted according to Skopos Labs (details)

History

May 18, 2018
 
Introduced

Bills and resolutions are referred to committees which debate the bill before possibly sending it on to the whole chamber.

Pending
 
Ordered Reported

Pending
 
Passed House (Senate next)

Pending
 
Passed Senate

Pending
 
Signed by the President

H.R. 5884 is a bill in the United States Congress.

A bill must be passed by both the House and Senate in identical form and then be signed by the President to become law.

How to cite this information.

We recommend the following MLA-formatted citation when using the information you see here in academic work:

“H.R. 5884 — 115th Congress: Mayor Libby Schaaf Act of 2018.” www.GovTrack.us. 2018. September 20, 2018 <https://www.govtrack.us/congress/bills/115/hr5884>

Where is this information from?

GovTrack automatically collects legislative information from a variety of governmental and non-governmental sources. This page is sourced primarily from Congress.gov, the official portal of the United States Congress. Congress.gov is generally updated one day after events occur, and so legislative activity shown here may be one day behind. Data via the congress project.