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H.R. 6136: Border Security and Immigration Reform Act of 2018

About the bill

Source: Republican Policy Committee

H.R. 6136 enhances enforcement of existing immigration law, closes immigration enforcement loopholes, ends the catch and release policy, provides $25 billion in funding to secure the border, provides a legislative solution for the current beneficiaries of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, and establishes a new merit-based visa program. Specific provisions of the bill include:

Division A – Border Enforcement

Title I: Border Security

Title I strengthens the requirements for barriers along the southern border by requiring the Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security to improve physical ...

Sponsor and status

Bob Goodlatte

Sponsor. Representative for Virginia's 6th congressional district. Republican.

Read Text »
Last Updated: Jun 19, 2018
Length: 299 pages
Introduced:

Jun 19, 2018
115th Congress, 2017–2019

Status:

Failed House on Jun 27, 2018

This bill failed in the House on June 27, 2018.

History

Jun 19, 2018
 
Introduced

Bills and resolutions are referred to committees which debate the bill before possibly sending it on to the whole chamber.

Jun 27, 2018
 
Failed House

A vote on the bill failed in the House. The bill is now dead.

H.R. 6136 is a bill in the United States Congress.

A bill must be passed by both the House and Senate in identical form and then be signed by the President to become law.

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“H.R. 6136 — 115th Congress: Border Security and Immigration Reform Act of 2018.” www.GovTrack.us. 2018. September 21, 2018 <https://www.govtrack.us/congress/bills/115/hr6136>

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