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S. 140: A bill to amend the White Mountain Apache Tribe Water Rights Quantification Act of 2010 to clarify the use of amounts in the WMAT Settlement Fund.

The Rules Committee Print includes the text of S. 140, to amend the White Mountain Apache Tribe Water Rights Quantification Act of 2010 to clarify the use of amounts in the WMAT Settlement Fund, S. 249, a bill to provide that the pueblo of Santa Clara may lease for 99 years certain restricted land, and H.R. 986, the Tribal Sovereignty Act of 2017.

Section 1 amends the White Mountain Apache Tribe (WMAT) Water Rights Quantification Act of 2010 to clarify that funds in the WMAT Settlement Fund are authorized to plan, design, and construct a rural water system.

Section 2 provides that the pueblo of Santa Clara may lease their restricted fee lands, similar to the authority they have to lease their trust lands, for up to 99 years, subject to the approval of the Secretary of the Interior. In general, under current law, the tribes can lease tribal lands to schools, businesses, and public entities for up to 25 years.

Section 3 would add tribes to the list of entities that are excluded from the definition of “employer” for purposes of the National Labor Relations Act.

Last updated Apr 16, 2018. Source: Republican Policy Committee

The summary below was written by the Congressional Research Service, which is a nonpartisan division of the Library of Congress, and was published on Jan 10, 2018.


(Sec. 1) This bill amends the White Mountain Apache Tribe Water Rights Quantification Act of 2010 to specify that settlement funds may be used for the planning, design, and construction of the tribe's rural water system in Arizona.

(Sec. 2) The bill amends the Act of August 9, 1955, commonly known as the Long-Term Leasing Act, to allow the Ohkay Owingeh pueblo and the pueblo of Santa Clara in New Mexico to lease their restricted fee tribal land (land that is owned by a tribe and has restrictions against alienation and taxation) for up to 99 years. Under current law, they may lease the lands for up to 25 years.

(Sec. 3) The bill amends the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) to exclude Native American tribes and tribal enterprises and institutions on tribal land from requirements for employers under the NLRA. (Currently under the NLRA, employers may not engage in unfair labor practices and must allow employees to form unions, engage in collective bargaining, and take collective action.)