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H.Res. 838 (116th): Commemorating the 10th anniversary of the Kleen Energy Systems natural gas explosion.


The text of the resolution below is as of Feb 7, 2020 (Introduced). The resolution was not adopted.


IV

116th CONGRESS

2d Session

H. RES. 838

IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

February 7, 2020

(for himself, Ms. DeLauro, Mr. Larson of Connecticut, Mr. Himes, and Mrs. Hayes) submitted the following resolution; which was referred to the Committee on Education and Labor

RESOLUTION

Commemorating the 10th anniversary of the Kleen Energy Systems natural gas explosion.

Whereas, on February 7, 2010, six workers died and dozens were injured in an explosion at the Kleen Energy Systems power station construction site in Middletown, Connecticut, when natural gas that had pooled on the ground caught fire;

Whereas Peter C. Chepulis, Ronald J. Crabb, Raymond E. Dobratz, Kenneth W. Haskell, Jr., Roy D. Rushton, and Vance C. Walters tragically lost their lives as a result of this preventable catastrophe;

Whereas the Occupational Safety and Health Administration found willful violations of safety protocol that led to the explosion;

Whereas fines assessed as a result of these violations were miniscule compared to the lives lost and the public resources required to rescue the injured, investigate the causes, and clean up the damage;

Whereas the statutory fines under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 are woefully out of date due to Congress’ failure to modernize the law since its passage;

Whereas each day an average of 14 workers are killed due to workplace injuries in the United States; and

Whereas tens of thousands of Americans with workplace injuries and illness have become permanently disabled: Now, therefore, be it

That the House of Representatives—

(1)

honors the memories of the workers killed in the Kleen Energy Systems natural gas explosion on February 7, 2010;

(2)

expresses its deepest sympathy to the families of the victims and those whose lives have been irreparably changed as a result of this disaster; and

(3)

recognizes—

(A)

the risks that workers face on the job; and

(B)

the need to strengthen and modernize the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 to better—

(i)

prevent deadly disasters;

(ii)

protect workers from occupational injury, illness, and retaliation; and

(iii)

hold employers accountable for violations of safety laws.