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S. 3022: Southwest Tourism Expansion Act


The text of the bill below is as of Dec 11, 2019 (Introduced).


II

116th CONGRESS

1st Session

S. 3022

IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES

December 11, 2019

(for herself and Ms. Sinema) introduced the following bill; which was read twice and referred to the Committee on the Judiciary

A BILL

To establish a pilot program waiving the Form I–94 document issuance requirement for certain Mexican nationals.

1.

Short title

This Act may be cited as the Southwest Tourism Expansion Act.

2.

Temporary waiver of Form I–94 border crossing cards and extension for certain Mexican nationals

(a)

In general

The Secretary of Homeland Security shall waive the requirement to issue a Arrival-Departure Record Card (commonly known as Form I–94) as evidence of admission to the United States for any national of Mexico who—

(1)

is eligible for admission to the United States as a nonimmigrant;

(2)

is exempt from—

(A)

the visa and passport requirement pursuant to section 212.1(c)(1)(i) of title 8, Code of Federal Regulations; or

(B)

the Form I–94 requirement under section 235.1(h) of such title; and

(3)

is admitted at a port of entry in the State of Arizona that is on the international border between the United States and Mexico for the purpose of visiting the State of Arizona for a period not to exceed 30 days.

(b)

Sunset

This section shall remain in effect during the 5-year period beginning on the date of the enactment of this Act.

3.

Report

Not later than 270 days before the end of the 5-year period referred to in section 2(b), the Secretary of Homeland Security shall submit a report to the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs of the Senate, the Committee on the Judiciary of the Senate, the Committee on Homeland Security of the House of Representatives, and the Committee on the Judiciary of the House of Representatives that identifies—

(1)

the difference between the number of Mexican nationals who entered the United States at a port of entry in the State of Arizona during the first 4 years of the 5-year period referred to in section 2(b) and the number of such entries during such 4-year period;

(2)

the estimated economic impact on Arizona generated by the additional Mexican nationals visiting the State;

(3)

the difference between the number of Mexican nationals who overstayed their visa after entering the United States through a port of entry in the State of Arizona during the first 4 years of the 5-year period referred to in section 2(b) and the number of such overstays during such 4-year period; and

(4)

the improvements to border security and the cost savings realized by U.S. Customs and Border Protection as a result of the waiver under section 2(a), which reduced the number of personnel needed to process Form I–94 documents and using a portion of such savings to enhance law enforcement functions.