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S. 1260: United States Innovation and Competition Act of 2021


The text of the bill below is as of Jun 8, 2021 (Passed the Senate).


117th CONGRESS

1st Session

S. 1260

IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES

AN ACT

To establish a new Directorate for Technology and Innovation in the National Science Foundation, to establish a regional technology hub program, to require a strategy and report on economic security, science, research, innovation, manufacturing, and job creation, to establish a critical supply chain resiliency program, and for other purposes.

1.

Short title; table of contents

(a)

Short title

This Act may be cited as the United States Innovation and Competition Act of 2021.

(b)

Table of contents

The table of contents for this Act is as follows:

Sec. 1. Short title; table of contents.

DIVISION A—CHIPS and O-RAN 5G Emergency appropriations

Sec. 1001. Table of contents.

Sec. 1002. Creating Helpful Incentives to Produce Semiconductors (CHIPS) for America Fund.

Sec. 1003. Appropriations for wireless supply chain innovation.

DIVISION B—Endless Frontier Act

Sec. 2001. Short title; table of contents.

Sec. 2002. Definitions.

Sec. 2003. Sense of Congress.

Sec. 2004. Interagency working group.

Sec. 2005. Key technology focus areas.

TITLE I—NSF Technology and Innovation

Sec. 2101. Definitions.

Sec. 2102. Directorate establishment and purpose.

Sec. 2103. Personnel management.

Sec. 2104. Innovation centers.

Sec. 2105. Transition of NSF programs.

Sec. 2106. Providing scholarships, fellowships, and other student support.

Sec. 2107. Research and development.

Sec. 2108. Test beds.

Sec. 2109. Academic technology transfer.

Sec. 2110. Capacity-building program for developing universities.

Sec. 2111. Technical assistance.

Sec. 2112. Coordination of activities.

Sec. 2113. Reporting requirements.

Sec. 2114. Hands-on learning program.

Sec. 2115. Intellectual property protection.

Sec. 2116. Authorization of appropriations for the Foundation.

Sec. 2117. Authorization of appropriations for the Department of Energy.

Sec. 2118. Authorization of appropriations for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.

TITLE II—NSF research, STEM, and geographic diversity initiatives

Sec. 2201. Chief Diversity Officer of the NSF.

Sec. 2202. Programs to address the STEM workforce.

Sec. 2203. Emerging research institution pilot program.

Sec. 2204. Personnel management authorities for the Foundation.

Sec. 2205. Advanced Technological Manufacturing Act.

Sec. 2206. Intramural emerging institutions pilot program.

Sec. 2207. Public-private partnerships.

Sec. 2208. AI Scholarship-for-Service Act.

Sec. 2209. Geographic diversity.

Sec. 2210. Rural STEM Education Act.

Sec. 2211. Quantum Network Infrastructure and Workforce Development Act.

Sec. 2212. Supporting Early-Career Researchers Act.

Sec. 2213. Advancing Precision Agriculture Capabilities Act.

Sec. 2214. Critical minerals mining research.

Sec. 2215. Caregiver policies.

Sec. 2216. Presidential awards.

Sec. 2217. Bioeconomy Research and Development Act of 2021.

Sec. 2218. Microgravity utilization policy.

TITLE III—Research security

Sec. 2301. National Science Foundation research security.

Sec. 2302. Research security and integrity information sharing analysis organization.

Sec. 2303. Foreign government talent recruitment program prohibition.

Sec. 2304. Additional requirements for Directorate research security.

Sec. 2305. Protecting research from cyber theft.

Sec. 2306. International standards development.

Sec. 2307. Research funds accounting.

Sec. 2308. Plan with respect to sensitive or controlled information and background screening.

TITLE IV—Regional innovation capacity

Sec. 2401. Regional technology hubs.

Sec. 2402. Manufacturing USA Program.

Sec. 2403. Establishment of expansion awards program in Hollings Manufacturing Extension Partnership and authorization of appropriations for the Partnership.

Sec. 2404. National Manufacturing Advisory Council.

TITLE V—Miscellaneous

Sec. 2501. Strategy and report on economic security, science, research, and innovation to support the national security strategy.

Sec. 2502. Person or entity of concern prohibition.

Sec. 2503. Study on emerging science and technology challenges faced by the United States and recommendations to address them.

Sec. 2504. Report on global semiconductor shortage.

Sec. 2505. Supply chain resiliency program.

Sec. 2506. Semiconductor incentives.

Sec. 2507. Research Investment to Spark the Economy Act.

Sec. 2508. Office of Manufacturing and Industrial Innovation Policy.

Sec. 2509. Telecommunications Workforce Training Grant Program.

Sec. 2510. Country Of Origin Labeling Online Act.

Sec. 2511. Country of origin labeling for king crab and tanner crab.

Sec. 2512. Internet exchanges and submarine cables.

Sec. 2513. Study of sister city partnerships operating within the United States involving foreign communities in countries with significant public sector corruption.

Sec. 2514. Prohibition on transfer, assignment, or disposition of construction permits and station licenses to entities subject to undue influence by the Chinese Communist Party or the Government of the People's Republic of China.

Sec. 2515. Limitation on nuclear cooperation with the People’s Republic of China.

Sec. 2516. Certification.

Sec. 2517. Fairness and due process in standards-setting bodies.

Sec. 2518. Shark fin sales elimination.

Sec. 2519. Sense of Congress on forced labor.

Sec. 2520. Open network architecture.

Sec. 2521. Combatting sexual harassment in science.

Sec. 2522. National Science Corps.

Sec. 2523. Annual report on foreign research.

Sec. 2524. Accelerating unmanned maritime systems research.

Sec. 2525. Foundation funding to institutions hosting or supporting Confucius Institutes.

Sec. 2526. Supporting documents.

Sec. 2527. BASIC Research.

Sec. 2528. Foundation for Energy Security and Innovation.

TITLE VI—Space matters

Subtitle A—SPACE Act

Sec. 2601. Short title.

Sec. 2602. Sense of Congress.

Sec. 2603. Definitions.

Sec. 2604. Space situational awareness data, information, and services: provision to non-United States Government entities.

Sec. 2605. Centers of Excellence for Space Situational Awareness.

Subtitle B—National Aeronautics and Space Administration Authorization Act

Sec. 2611. Short title.

Sec. 2612. Definitions.

PART I—Authorization of appropriations

Sec. 2613. Authorization of appropriations.

PART II—Human spaceflight and exploration

Sec. 2614. Competitiveness within the human landing system program.

Sec. 2615. Space launch system configurations.

Sec. 2616. Advanced spacesuits.

Sec. 2617. Acquisition of domestic space transportation and logistics resupply services.

Sec. 2618. Rocket engine test infrastructure.

Sec. 2619. Pearl River maintenance.

Sec. 2620. Value of International Space Station and capabilities in low-Earth orbit.

Sec. 2621. Extension and modification relating to International Space Station.

Sec. 2622. Department of Defense activities on International Space Station.

Sec. 2623. Commercial development in low-Earth orbit.

Sec. 2624. Maintaining a national laboratory in space.

Sec. 2625. International Space Station national laboratory; property rights in inventions.

Sec. 2626. Data first produced during non-NASA scientific use of the ISS national laboratory.

Sec. 2627. Payments received for commercial space-enabled production on the ISS.

Sec. 2628. Stepping stone approach to exploration.

Sec. 2629. Technical amendments relating to Artemis missions.

PART III—Science

Sec. 2631. Science priorities.

Sec. 2632. Lunar discovery program.

Sec. 2633. Search for life.

Sec. 2634. James Webb Space Telescope.

Sec. 2635. Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope.

Sec. 2636. Study on satellite servicing for science missions.

Sec. 2637. Earth science missions and programs.

Sec. 2638. Life science and physical science research.

Sec. 2639. Science missions to Mars.

Sec. 2640. Planetary Defense Coordination Office.

Sec. 2641. Suborbital science flights.

Sec. 2642. Earth science data and observations.

Sec. 2643. Sense of Congress on small satellite science.

Sec. 2644. Sense of Congress on commercial space services.

Sec. 2645. Procedures for identifying and addressing alleged violations of scientific integrity policy.

PART IV—Aeronautics

Sec. 2646. Short title.

Sec. 2647. Definitions.

Sec. 2648. Experimental aircraft projects.

Sec. 2649. Unmanned aircraft systems.

Sec. 2650. 21st Century Aeronautics Capabilities Initiative.

Sec. 2651. Sense of Congress on on-demand air transportation.

Sec. 2652. Sense of Congress on hypersonic technology research.

PART V—Space technology

Sec. 2653. Space Technology Mission Directorate.

Sec. 2654. Flight opportunities program.

Sec. 2655. Small Spacecraft Technology Program.

Sec. 2656. Nuclear propulsion technology.

Sec. 2657. Mars-forward technologies.

Sec. 2658. Prioritization of low-enriched uranium technology.

Sec. 2659. Sense of Congress on next-generation communications technology.

Sec. 2660. Lunar surface technologies.

PART VI—STEM engagement

Sec. 2661. Sense of Congress.

Sec. 2662. STEM education engagement activities.

Sec. 2663. Skilled technical education outreach program.

Sec. 2664. National space grant college and fellowship program.

PART VII—Workforce and industrial base

Sec. 2665. Appointment and compensation pilot program.

Sec. 2666. Establishment of multi-institution consortia.

Sec. 2667. Expedited access to technical talent and expertise.

Sec. 2668. Report on industrial base for civil space missions and operations.

Sec. 2669. Separations and retirement incentives.

Sec. 2670. Confidentiality of medical quality assurance records.

PART VIII—Miscellaneous provisions

Sec. 2671. Contracting authority.

Sec. 2672. Authority for transaction prototype projects and follow-on production contracts.

Sec. 2673. Protection of data and information from public disclosure.

Sec. 2674. Physical security modernization.

Sec. 2675. Lease of non-excess property.

Sec. 2676. Cybersecurity.

Sec. 2677. Limitation on cooperation with the People's Republic of China.

Sec. 2678. Consideration of issues related to contracting with entities receiving assistance from or affiliated with the People’s Republic of China.

Sec. 2679. Small satellite launch services program.

Sec. 2680. 21st century space launch infrastructure.

Sec. 2681. Missions of national need.

Sec. 2682. Drinking water well replacement for Chincoteague, Virginia.

Sec. 2683. Passenger carrier use.

Sec. 2684. Use of commercial near-space balloons.

Sec. 2685. President’s Space Advisory Board.

Sec. 2686. Initiative on technologies for noise and emissions reductions.

Sec. 2687. Remediation of sites contaminated with trichloroethylene.

Sec. 2688. Review on preference for domestic suppliers.

Sec. 2689. Report on use of commercial spaceports licensed by the Federal Aviation Administration.

Sec. 2690. Active orbital debris mitigation.

Sec. 2691. Study on commercial communications services.

DIVISION C—Strategic Competition Act of 2021

Sec. 3001. Short title; table of contents.

Sec. 3002. Findings.

Sec. 3003. Definitions.

Sec. 3004. Statement of policy.

Sec. 3005. Sense of Congress.

Sec. 3006. Rules of construction.

TITLE I—Investing in a competitive future

Subtitle A—Science and technology

Sec. 3101. Authorization to assist United States companies with global supply chain diversification and management.

Subtitle B—Global infrastructure and energy development

Sec. 3111. Appropriate committees of Congress defined.

Sec. 3112. Sense of Congress on international quality infrastructure investment standards.

Sec. 3113. United States support for infrastructure.

Sec. 3114. Infrastructure Transaction and Assistance Network.

Sec. 3115. Strategy for advanced and reliable energy infrastructure.

Sec. 3116. Report on the People’s Republic of China’s investments in foreign energy development.

Subtitle C—Digital technology and connectivity

Sec. 3121. Sense of Congress on digital technology issues.

Sec. 3122. Digital connectivity and cybersecurity partnership.

Sec. 3123. Strategy for digital investment by United States International Development Finance Corporation.

Subtitle D—Countering Chinese Communist Party malign influence

Sec. 3131. Short title.

Sec. 3132. Authorization of appropriations for countering Chinese Influence Fund.

Sec. 3133. Findings on Chinese information warfare and malign influence operations.

Sec. 3134. Authorization of appropriations for the Fulbright-Hays Program.

Sec. 3135. Sense of Congress condemning anti-Asian racism and discrimination.

Sec. 3136. Supporting independent media and countering disinformation.

Sec. 3137. Global engagement center.

Sec. 3138. Review by Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States of certain foreign gifts to and contracts with institutions of higher education.

Sec. 3139. Post-employment restrictions on Senate-confirmed officials at the Department of State.

Sec. 3140. Sense of Congress on prioritizing nomination of qualified ambassadors to ensure proper diplomatic positioning to counter Chinese influence.

Sec. 3141. China Censorship Monitor and Action Group.

TITLE II—Investing in alliances and partnerships

Subtitle A—Strategic and diplomatic matters

Sec. 3201. Appropriate committees of Congress defined.

Sec. 3202. United States commitment and support for allies and partners in the Indo-Pacific.

Sec. 3203. Sense of Congress on cooperation with the Quad.

Sec. 3204. Establishment of Quad Intra-Parliamentary Working Group.

Sec. 3205. Statement of policy on cooperation with ASEAN.

Sec. 3206. Sense of Congress on enhancing United States–ASEAN cooperation on technology issues with respect to the People’s Republic of China.

Sec. 3207. Report on Chinese influence in international organizations.

Sec. 3208. Regulatory exchanges with allies and partners.

Sec. 3209. Technology partnership office at the Department of State.

Sec. 3210. United States representation in standards-setting bodies.

Sec. 3211. Sense of Congress on centrality of sanctions and other restrictions to strategic competition with China.

Sec. 3212. Sense of Congress on negotiations with G7 and G20 countries.

Sec. 3213. Enhancing the United States-Taiwan partnership.

Sec. 3214. Taiwan Fellowship Program.

Sec. 3215. Treatment of Taiwan government.

Sec. 3216. Taiwan symbols of sovereignty.

Sec. 3217. Report on origins of the COVID–19 pandemic.

Sec. 3218. Enhancement of diplomatic support and economic engagement with Pacific island countries.

Sec. 3219. Increasing Department of State personnel and resources devoted to the Indo-Pacific.

Sec. 3219A. Advancing United States leadership in the United Nations System.

Sec. 3219B. Asia Reassurance Initiative Act of 2018.

Sec. 3219C. Statement of policy on need for reciprocity in the relationship between the United States and the People’s Republic of China.

Sec. 3219D. Opposition to provision of assistance to People's Republic of China by Asian Development Bank.

Sec. 3219E. Opposition to provision of assistance to People's Republic of China by International Bank for Reconstruction and Development.

Sec. 3219F. United States policy on Chinese and Russian government efforts to undermine the United Nations Security Council action on human rights.

Sec. 3219G. Deterring PRC use of force against Taiwan.

Sec. 3219H. Strategy to respond to sharp power operations targeting Taiwan.

Sec. 3219I. Study and report on bilateral efforts to address Chinese fentanyl trafficking.

Sec. 3219J. Investment, trade, and development in Africa and Latin America and the Caribbean.

Sec. 3219K. Facilitation of increased equity investments under the Better Utilization of Investments Leading to Development Act of 2018.

Subtitle B—International security matters

Sec. 3221. Definitions.

Sec. 3222. Findings.

Sec. 3223. Sense of Congress regarding bolstering security partnerships in the Indo-Pacific.

Sec. 3224. Statement of policy.

Sec. 3225. Foreign military financing in the Indo-Pacific and authorization of appropriations for Southeast Asia maritime security programs and diplomatic outreach activities.

Sec. 3226. Foreign military financing compact pilot program in the Indo-Pacific.

Sec. 3227. Additional funding for international military education and training in the Indo-Pacific.

Sec. 3228. Prioritizing excess defense article transfers for the Indo-Pacific.

Sec. 3229. Prioritizing excess naval vessel transfers for the Indo-Pacific.

Sec. 3230. Statement of policy on maritime freedom of operations in international waterways and airspace of the Indo-Pacific and on artificial land features in the South China Sea.

Sec. 3231. Report on capability development of Indo-Pacific allies and partners.

Sec. 3232. Report on national technology and industrial base.

Sec. 3233. Report on diplomatic outreach with respect to Chinese military installations overseas.

Sec. 3234. Statement of policy regarding universal implementation of United Nations sanctions on North Korea.

Sec. 3235. Limitation on assistance to countries hosting Chinese military installations.

Subtitle C—Regional strategies to counter the People’s Republic of China

Sec. 3241. Statement of policy on cooperation with allies and partners around the world with respect to the People’s Republic of China.

PART I—Western Hemisphere

Sec. 3245. Sense of Congress regarding United States-Canada relations.

Sec. 3246. Sense of Congress regarding the Government of the People's Republic of China’s arbitrary imprisonment of Canadian citizens.

Sec. 3247. Strategy to enhance cooperation with Canada.

Sec. 3248. Strategy to strengthen economic competitiveness, governance, human rights, and the rule of law in Latin America and the Caribbean.

Sec. 3249. Engagement in international organizations and the defense sector in Latin America and the Caribbean.

Sec. 3250. Addressing China’s sovereign lending practices in Latin America and the Caribbean.

Sec. 3251. Defense cooperation in Latin America and the Caribbean.

Sec. 3252. Engagement with civil society in Latin America and the Caribbean regarding accountability, human rights, and the risks of pervasive surveillance technologies.

PART II—Transatlantic alliance

Sec. 3255. Sense of Congress on the Transatlantic alliance.

Sec. 3256. Strategy to enhance transatlantic cooperation with respect to the People’s Republic of China.

Sec. 3257. Enhancing Transatlantic cooperation on promoting private sector finance.

Sec. 3258. Report and briefing on cooperation between China and Iran and between China and Russia.

Sec. 3259. Promoting responsible development alternatives to the belt and road initiative.

PART III—South and Central Asia

Sec. 3261. Sense of Congress on South and Central Asia.

Sec. 3262. Strategy to enhance cooperation with South and Central Asia.

PART IV—Africa

Sec. 3271. Assessment of political, economic, and security activity of the People’s Republic of China in Africa.

Sec. 3272. Increasing the competitiveness of the United States in Africa.

Sec. 3273. Digital security cooperation with respect to Africa.

Sec. 3274. Increasing personnel in United States embassies in sub-Saharan Africa focused on the People’s Republic of China.

Sec. 3275. Support for Young African Leaders Initiative.

Sec. 3276. Africa broadcasting networks.

PART V—Middle East and North Africa

Sec. 3281. Strategy to counter Chinese influence in, and access to, the Middle East and North Africa.

Sec. 3282. Sense of Congress on Middle East and North Africa engagement.

PART VI—Arctic Region

Sec. 3285. Arctic diplomacy.

PART VII—Oceania

Sec. 3291. Statement of policy on United States engagement in Oceania.

Sec. 3292. Oceania strategic roadmap.

Sec. 3293. Review of USAID programming in Oceania.

Sec. 3294. Oceania Security Dialogue.

Sec. 3295. Report on countering illegal, unreported, and unregulated fishing in Oceania.

Sec. 3296. Oceania Peace Corps partnerships.

TITLE III—Investing in our values

Sec. 3301. Authorization of appropriations for promotion of democracy in Hong Kong.

Sec. 3302. Imposition of sanctions relating to forced labor in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region.

Sec. 3303. Imposition of sanctions with respect to systematic rape, coercive abortion, forced sterilization, or involuntary contraceptive implantation in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region.

Sec. 3304. Report on corrupt activities of senior officials of Government of the People’s Republic of China.

Sec. 3305. Removal of members of the United Nations Human Rights Council that commit human rights abuses.

Sec. 3306. Policy with respect to Tibet.

Sec. 3307. United States policy and international engagement on the succession or reincarnation of the Dalai Lama and religious freedom of Tibetan Buddhists.

Sec. 3308. Sense of Congress on treatment of Uyghurs and other ethnic minorities in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region.

Sec. 3309. Development and deployment of internet freedom and Great Firewall circumvention tools for the people of Hong Kong.

Sec. 3310. Enhancing transparency on international agreements and non-binding instruments.

Sec. 3311. Authorization of appropriations for protecting human rights in the People’s Republic of China.

Sec. 3312. Diplomatic boycott of the XXIV Olympic Winter Games and the XIII Paralympic Winter Games.

Sec. 3313. Repeal of sunset applicable to authority under Global Magnitsky Human Rights Accountability Act.

TITLE IV—Investing in our economic statecraft

Sec. 3401. Findings and sense of Congress regarding the PRC’s industrial policy.

Sec. 3402. Intellectual property violators list.

Sec. 3403. Government of the People’s Republic of China subsidies list.

Sec. 3404. Countering foreign corrupt practices.

Sec. 3405. Debt relief for countries eligible for assistance from the International Development Association.

Sec. 3406. Report on manner and extent to which the Government of the People's Republic of China exploits Hong Kong to circumvent United States laws and protections.

Sec. 3407. Annual review on the presence of Chinese companies in United States capital markets.

Sec. 3408. Economic defense response teams.

TITLE V—Ensuring strategic security

Sec. 3501. Findings on strategic security and arms control.

Sec. 3502. Cooperation on a strategic nuclear dialogue.

Sec. 3503. Report on United States efforts to engage the People’s Republic of China on nuclear issues and ballistic missile issues.

Sec. 3504. Countering the People's Republic of China’s proliferation of ballistic missiles and nuclear technology to the Middle East.

DIVISION D—Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee provisions

Sec. 4001. Short title; table of contents.

TITLE I—Ensuring domestic manufacturing capabilities

Subtitle A—Build America, Buy America

Sec. 4101. Short title.

PART I—Buy America sourcing requirements

Sec. 4111. Findings.

Sec. 4112. Definitions.

Sec. 4113. Identification of deficient programs.

Sec. 4114. Application of Buy America preference.

Sec. 4115. OMB guidance and standards.

Sec. 4116. Technical assistance partnership and consultation supporting Department of Transportation Buy America requirements.

Sec. 4117. Application.

PART II—Make it in America

Sec. 4121. Regulations relating to Buy American Act.

Sec. 4122. Amendments relating to Buy American Act.

Sec. 4123. Made in America Office.

Sec. 4124. Hollings Manufacturing Extension Partnership activities.

Sec. 4125. United States obligations under international agreements.

Sec. 4126. Definitions.

Sec. 4127. Prospective amendments to internal cross-references.

Subtitle B—BuyAmerican.gov

Sec. 4131. Short title.

Sec. 4132. Definitions.

Sec. 4133. Sense of Congress on buying American.

Sec. 4134. Assessment of impact of free trade agreements.

Sec. 4135. Judicious use of waivers.

Sec. 4136. Establishment of BuyAmerican.gov website.

Sec. 4137. Waiver Transparency and Streamlining for contracts.

Sec. 4138. Comptroller General report.

Sec. 4139. Rules of construction.

Sec. 4140. Consistency with international agreements.

Sec. 4141. Prospective amendments to internal cross-references.

Subtitle C—Make PPE in America

Sec. 4151. Short title.

Sec. 4152. Findings.

Sec. 4153. Requirement of long-term contracts for domestically manufactured personal protective equipment.

TITLE II—Cyber and artificial intelligence

Subtitle A—Advancing American AI

Sec. 4201. Short title.

Sec. 4202. Purpose.

Sec. 4203. Definitions.

Sec. 4204. Principles and policies for use of artificial intelligence in Government.

Sec. 4205. Agency inventories and artificial intelligence use cases.

Sec. 4206. Rapid pilot, deployment and scale of applied artificial intelligence capabilities to demonstrate modernization activities related to use cases.

Sec. 4207. Enabling entrepreneurs and agency missions.

Subtitle B—Cyber response and recovery

Sec. 4251. Short title.

Sec. 4252. Declaration of a significant incident.

TITLE III—Personnel

Subtitle A—Facilitating Federal employee reskilling

Sec. 4301. Short title.

Sec. 4302. Reskilling Federal employees.

Subtitle B—Federal Rotational Cyber Workforce Program

Sec. 4351. Short title.

Sec. 4352. Definitions.

Sec. 4353. Rotational cyber workforce positions.

Sec. 4354. Rotational cyber workforce program.

Sec. 4355. Reporting by GAO.

Sec. 4356. Sunset.

TITLE IV—Other matters

Subtitle A—Ensuring security of unmanned aircraft systems

Sec. 4401. Short title.

Sec. 4402. Definitions.

Sec. 4403. Prohibition on procurement of covered unmanned aircraft systems from covered foreign entities.

Sec. 4404. Prohibition on operation of covered unmanned aircraft systems from covered foreign entities.

Sec. 4405. Prohibition on use of Federal funds for purchases and operation of covered unmanned aircraft systems from covered foreign entities.

Sec. 4406. Prohibition on use of Government-issued Purchase Cards to purchase covered unmanned aircraft systems from covered foreign entities.

Sec. 4407. Management of existing inventories of covered unmanned aircraft systems from covered foreign entities.

Sec. 4408. Comptroller General report.

Sec. 4409. Government-wide policy for procurement of unmanned aircraft systems.

Sec. 4410. Study.

Sec. 4411. Sunset.

Subtitle B—No TikTok on Government devices

Sec. 4431. Short title.

Sec. 4432. Prohibition on the use of TikTok.

Subtitle C—National Risk Management

Sec. 4461. Short title.

Sec. 4462. National risk management cycle.

Subtitle D—Safeguarding American innovation

Sec. 4491. Short title.

Sec. 4492. Definitions.

Sec. 4493. Federal Research Security Council.

Sec. 4494. Federal grant application fraud.

Sec. 4495. Restricting the acquisition of emerging technologies by certain aliens.

Sec. 4496. Machine readable visa documents.

Sec. 4497. Certifications regarding access to export controlled technology in educational and cultural exchange programs.

Sec. 4498. Privacy and confidentiality.

DIVISION E—Meeting the China Challenge Act of 2021

Sec. 5001. Short title; table of contents.

TITLE I—Financial Services

Sec. 5101. Findings on transparency and disclosure; sense of Congress.

Sec. 5102. Establishment of interagency task force to address Chinese market manipulation in the United States.

Sec. 5103. Expansion of study and strategy on money laundering by the People's Republic of China to include risks of contributing to corruption.

Sec. 5104. Statement of policy to encourage the development of a corporate code of conduct for countering malign influence in the private sector.

TITLE II—Protecting United States National Security

Subtitle A—Sanctions with respect to People's Republic of China

Sec. 5201. Definitions.

Sec. 5202. Use of sanctions authorities with respect to the People's Republic of China.

Sec. 5203. Imposition of sanctions with respect to activities of the People's Republic of China undermining cybersecurity, including cyber attacks on United States Government or private sector networks.

Sec. 5204. Imposition of sanctions with respect to theft of trade secrets of United States persons.

Sec. 5205. Implementation; penalties.

Sec. 5206. Exceptions.

Subtitle B—Export Control Review And Other Matters

Sec. 5211. Review and controls on export of items with critical capabilities to enable human rights abuses.

Sec. 5212. Prohibition on reviews by Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States of certain foreign gifts to and contracts with institutions of higher education.

Sec. 5213. Conforming amendments to Treasury positions established by Foreign Investment Risk Review Modernization Act of 2018.

TITLE III—Reports

Sec. 5301. Review of the presence of Chinese entities in United States capital markets.

Sec. 5302. Report on malign activity involving Chinese state-owned enterprises.

Sec. 5303. Report on use and applicability of sanctions to Chinese officials complicit in human rights violations and violations of United States sanctions with respect to Hong Kong.

Sec. 5304. Report on domestic shortfalls of industrial resources, materials, and critical technology items essential to the national defense.

Sec. 5305. Report on implementation of process for exchange of information between Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States and allies and partners.

Sec. 5306. Report on economic and national security implications of changes to cross-border payment and financial messaging systems.

Sec. 5307. Report on development and utilization of dual-use technologies by the Government of the People's Republic of China.

Sec. 5308. Report on currency issues with respect to the People's Republic of China.

Sec. 5309. Report on exposure of the United States to the financial system of the People's Republic of China.

Sec. 5310. Report on investment reciprocity between the United States and the People's Republic of China.

DIVISION F—Other matters

Sec. 6001. Table of contents.

TITLE I—Competitiveness and security for education and medical research

Subtitle A—Department of Health and Human Services programs

Sec. 6101. Foreign talent programs.

Sec. 6102. Securing identifiable, sensitive information.

Sec. 6103. Duties of the Director.

Sec. 6104. Protecting America’s biomedical research enterprise.

Sec. 6105. GAO Study.

Sec. 6106. Report on progress to address undue foreign influence.

Sec. 6107. Prohibition on funding for gain-of-function research conducted in China.

Subtitle B—Elementary and secondary education

Sec. 6111. Postsecondary stem pathways grants.

Sec. 6112. Improving access to elementary and secondary computer science education.

Subtitle C—Higher education

Sec. 6121. Reauthorization of international education programs under title VI of the Higher Education Act of 1965.

Sec. 6122. Confucius Institutes.

Sec. 6123. Sustaining the Truman Foundation and the Madison Foundation.

Sec. 6124. Disclosures of foreign gifts and contracts at institutions of higher education.

TITLE II—Committee on the Judiciary provisions

Sec. 6201. Short title.

Sec. 6202. Premerger notification filing fees.

Sec. 6203. Authorization of appropriations.

Sec. 6204. Collection of demographic information for patent inventors.

TITLE III—Miscellaneous

Sec. 6301. Enhancing entrepreneurship for the 21st century.

Sec. 6302. Prohibition on Federal funding for Wuhan Institute of Virology.

Sec. 6303. Enforcement of intellectual property provisions of Economic and Trade Agreement Between the Government of the United States of America and the Government of China.

Sec. 6304. Findings and sense of the Senate regarding an investigation to determine the origins of COVID–19.

DIVISION G—Trade Act of 2021

Sec. 70001. Short title; table of contents.

Sec. 70002. Appropriate congressional committees defined.

TITLE I—Trading Consistent with American values

Subtitle A—Preventing Importation of Goods Produced by Forced Labor

Sec. 71001. Investigations of allegations of goods produced by forced labor.

Sec. 71002. Preventing importation of seafood and seafood products harvested or produced using forced labor.

Subtitle B—Addressing Censorship and Barriers to Digital Trade

Sec. 71011. Censorship as a trade barrier.

Sec. 71012. Designation of official responsible for monitoring unfair trade practices of suppliers of information and communications equipment.

Sec. 71013. Negotiation of digital trade agreements.

Subtitle C—Protecting Innovators and Consumers

Sec. 71021. Technical and legal support for addressing intellectual property rights infringement cases.

Sec. 71022. Improvement of anti-counterfeiting measures.

Sec. 71023. Reports on chicken, beef, and other meat imports.

Sec. 71024. Joint enforcement with allies with respect to importation of goods made with stolen intellectual property.

Sec. 71025. Sense of Congress and report on ensuring reliable supply of rare earth minerals.

Subtitle D—Ensuring a Level Playing Field

Sec. 71031. Report on manner and extent to which the Government of the People’s Republic of China exploits Hong Kong to circumvent United States laws and protections.

Sec. 71032. Assessment of overcapacity of industries in the People's Republic of China.

Sec. 71033. Duties of Interagency Center on Trade Implementation, Monitoring, and Enforcement.

Sec. 71034. Briefing on report related to process for excluding articles imported from the People’s Republic of China from certain duties imposed under section 301 of the Trade Act of 1974.

TITLE II—Ensuring Resiliency in Critical Supply Chains

Sec. 72001. Facilitating trade in essential supplies.

Sec. 72002. Supply chain database and toolkit.

TITLE III—Improving Transparency and Administration of Trade Programs and Oversight and Accountability of Trade Agencies

Sec. 73001. Process for exclusion of articles from duties under section 301 of the Trade Act of 1974.

Sec. 73002. Enhanced congressional oversight of the United States Trade Representative and the Department of Commerce.

Sec. 73003. Establishment of Inspector General of the Office of the United States Trade Representative.

Sec. 73004. Authority of U.S. Customs and Border Protection to consolidate, modify, or reorganize customs revenue functions.

Sec. 73005. Protection from public disclosure of personally identifiable information contained in manifests.

Sec. 73006. Sense of Congress on leadership at World Trade Organization.

TITLE IV—Promoting American Competitiveness

Subtitle A—Reauthorization and Reform of Generalized System of Preferences

Sec. 74001. Modification of eligibility criteria for beneficiary developing countries.

Sec. 74002. Supplemental reviews and reporting.

Sec. 74003. Extension of Generalized System of Preferences.

Subtitle B—Temporary Duty Suspensions and Reductions

Sec. 74011. Reference.

PART I—New Duty Suspensions and Reductions

Sec. 74021. Shelled pine nuts.

Sec. 74022. Licorice extract.

Sec. 74023. Refined Carrageenan.

Sec. 74024. Irish dairy chocolate crumb.

Sec. 74025. Pepperoncini, preserved in vinegar.

Sec. 74026. Coconut water in PET bottles.

Sec. 74027. 9,11-Octadecadienoic acid.

Sec. 74028. Liquid galacto-oligosaccharides.

Sec. 74029. Beverage containing coconut water.

Sec. 74030. Animal feed additive containing guanidinoacetic acid.

Sec. 74031. Tungsten concentrate.

Sec. 74032. Piperylene.

Sec. 74033. Normal paraffin M (alkanes C10–C14).

Sec. 74034. Neodymium (Nd) metal.

Sec. 74035. Praseodymium (Pr) metal.

Sec. 74036. Heavy rare earth metals, dysprosium (Dy) metal and terbium (Tb) metal.

Sec. 74037. Scandium crystal.

Sec. 74038. Hexafluorotitanic acid.

Sec. 74039. Silica gel cat litter with tray.

Sec. 74040. Dioxosilane spherical particles (mean particle size 0.046–0.054 mm).

Sec. 74041. Silica gel cat litter.

Sec. 74042. Sulfuryl dichloride.

Sec. 74043. FS-10D acicular electroconductive tin oxide.

Sec. 74044. Certain potassium fluoride.

Sec. 74045. Other potassium fluoride.

Sec. 74046. LiPF6.

Sec. 74047. LiPO2F2.

Sec. 74048. Ammonium fluoroborate.

Sec. 74049. Sodium tetrafluoroborate.

Sec. 74050. Ferric chloride.

Sec. 74051. Ferrous chloride.

Sec. 74052. Cupric chloride dihydrate.

Sec. 74053. Copper chloride anhydrous.

Sec. 74054. Manganese chloride anhydrous.

Sec. 74055. Manganese chloride tetrahydrate.

Sec. 74056. Reducing agent.

Sec. 74057. Manganese carbonate.

Sec. 74058. Potassium tetraborate.

Sec. 74059. Potassium pentaborate.

Sec. 74060. Ammonium thiocyanate.

Sec. 74061. Modified amine complex of boron trifluoride.

Sec. 74062. Trichlorosilane.

Sec. 74063. 1,3-Dichloropropene.

Sec. 74064. Hexafluoroisobutylene (HFIB).

Sec. 74065. 1,1,1,2,2,3,3,4,4,5,5,6,6-Tridecafluoro-8-iodooctane.

Sec. 74066. Ethyl benzyl chloride.

Sec. 74067. Perfluoroalkyl sulfonate.

Sec. 74068. D-Mannitol.

Sec. 74069. 3,3,4,4,5,5,6,6,7,7,8,8,8-Tridecafluorooctan-1-ol.

Sec. 74070. Phenyl isopropanol.

Sec. 74071. Hydroxytyrosol.

Sec. 74072. 1,6-Dihydroxynaphthalene.

Sec. 74073. Antioxidant for plastics and rubber.

Sec. 74074. Toluhydroquinone (THQ).

Sec. 74075. 1,1,1-Tris(4-hydroxyphenyl)ethane.

Sec. 74076. mPEG6-mesylate.

Sec. 74077. Monoethylene glycol dimethyl ether.

Sec. 74078. Diethylene glycol dimethyl ether.

Sec. 74079. Diethylene glycol dibutyl ether.

Sec. 74080. Tetraethylene glycol dimethyl ether.

Sec. 74081. Glycol diether.

Sec. 74082. Diglycidyl resorcinol ether.

Sec. 74083. Allyl glycidyl ether.

Sec. 74084. Vinylcyclohexane monoxide.

Sec. 74085. Technical grade of butyl glycidyl ether.

Sec. 74086. Aliphatic glycidyl ether.

Sec. 74087. Diglycidyl ether of 1,4-butanediol.

Sec. 74088. Technical grade of the glycidyl ether of cyclohexane dimethanol.

Sec. 74089. Glycidyl ester of neodecanoic acid.

Sec. 74090. Cumaldehyde.

Sec. 74091. Cyprinal.

Sec. 74092. Sodium o-formylbenzenesulfonate.

Sec. 74093. Acetylacetone.

Sec. 74094. Acetyl propionyl.

Sec. 74095. Alpha ionone.

Sec. 74096. 2,3,4,5 Tetramethylcyclopent-2-enone.

Sec. 74097. Menthone.

Sec. 74098. L-Carvone.

Sec. 74099. Benzoin.

Sec. 74100. Methyl cyclopentenolone.

Sec. 74101. 2,4-Dihydroxy-1,5-dibenzoylbenzene.

Sec. 74102. Difluorobenzophenone (DFBP).

Sec. 74103. PTMI.

Sec. 74104. Metrafenone.

Sec. 74105. Hexachloroacetone.

Sec. 74106. Fire suppression agent.

Sec. 74107. D(+)-10-Camphor sulfonic acid.

Sec. 74108. Benzyl acetate.

Sec. 74109. Propylene glycol diacetate.

Sec. 74110. Isopropenyl acetate.

Sec. 74111. Diacetin.

Sec. 74112. Cocoamine.

Sec. 74113. Caprylic acid 98%.

Sec. 74114. Fine zinc myristate powder.

Sec. 74115. Fine magnesium myristate powder.

Sec. 74116. Dipentaerythrityl hexahydroxystearate/hexastearate/hexarosinate.

Sec. 74117. Polyglyceryl-2 triisostearate.

Sec. 74118. Neopentyl glycol diethylhexanoate.

Sec. 74119. Isononyl isononate.

Sec. 74120. Acetyl chloride.

Sec. 74121. Potassium sorbate.

Sec. 74122. Vinyl chloroformate.

Sec. 74123. Permethrin.

Sec. 74124. Sodium benzoate.

Sec. 74125. Benzoic acid, flake.

Sec. 74126. Diethylene glycol dibenzoate.

Sec. 74127. Methyl benzoate.

Sec. 74128. M-Nitrobenzoic acid sodium salt.

Sec. 74129. p-Nitrobenzoic acid.

Sec. 74130. 4-tert Butylbenzoic acid.

Sec. 74131. Sodium adipate.

Sec. 74132. Dimethyl sebacate (DMS).

Sec. 74133. Dodecanedioic acid.

Sec. 74134. Polyhydroxystearic acid of low acid value.

Sec. 74135. Undecanedioic acid.

Sec. 74136. Hexadecanedioic acid.

Sec. 74137. Tetradecanedioic acid.

Sec. 74138. Pentadecanedioic acid.

Sec. 74139. Tridecanedioic acid.

Sec. 74140. Methyl 1-(methoxycarbonyl)cyclopropanecarboxylate (CPDM).

Sec. 74141. Calcium HHPA.

Sec. 74142. Diethyl phthalate.

Sec. 74143. Ammonium lactate.

Sec. 74144. Triethyl 2-hydroxypropane-1,2,3-tricarboxylate.

Sec. 74145. Diisostearyl malate.

Sec. 74146. Salicylic acid.

Sec. 74147. Hexyl salicylate.

Sec. 74148. Alpha-ketogluteric acid.

Sec. 74149. MCPB herbicide.

Sec. 74150. 2,4-D Butoxyethylester.

Sec. 74151. 2-(2,4-Dichlorophenoxy)acetic acid.

Sec. 74152. Diglycolic acid 98%.

Sec. 74153. Tri-iso-butyl phosphate (TiBP).

Sec. 74154. Trimethylphosphite.

Sec. 74155. Organic phosphite.

Sec. 74156. Diethyl sulfate.

Sec. 74157. Diethyl carbonate.

Sec. 74158. Ethyl methyl carbonate.

Sec. 74159. Tetradecoxycarbonyloxy tetradecyl carbonate.

Sec. 74160. Dicetyl peroxydicarbonate.

Sec. 74161. Tetraethyl silicate.

Sec. 74162. tert-Octylamine.

Sec. 74163. Octadecylamine.

Sec. 74164. N′-(3-Aminopropyl)-N′-dodecylpropane-1,3-diamine.

Sec. 74165. 1,10-Diaminodecane.

Sec. 74166. 1,5-Pentanediamine.

Sec. 74167. Dicyclohexylamine.

Sec. 74168. Amantadine hydrochloride 99%.

Sec. 74169. N,N-Dimethylaniline.

Sec. 74170. Paranitroaniline (PNA).

Sec. 74171. Dicloran.

Sec. 74172. N,N-Dimethyl-p-toluidine.

Sec. 74173. Pendimethalin technical.

Sec. 74174. Benzyldimethylamine.

Sec. 74175. Diphenyl diphenylene diamine.

Sec. 74176. Curative for epoxy resin systems.

Sec. 74177. TFMB.

Sec. 74178. S-N-Alkyl-anilin.

Sec. 74179. p-Cresidine.

Sec. 74180. Iminodiacetic acid.

Sec. 74181. 11 Aminoundecanoic acid.

Sec. 74182. L-Orinithine L-aspartate.

Sec. 74183. Iron sodium DTPA.

Sec. 74184. Iron glycinate complex.

Sec. 74185. Copper glycinate complex.

Sec. 74186. Zinc glycinate complex.

Sec. 74187. Manganese glycinate complex.

Sec. 74188. Iron sodium EDDHA.

Sec. 74189. DMF-DMA.

Sec. 74190. Mixtures of DMSO and tetrabutyl ammonium fluoride.

Sec. 74191. Betaine.

Sec. 74192. Prolonium chloride in aqueous solution.

Sec. 74193. N,N-Dimethylacetamide.

Sec. 74194. N,N-Dimethylformamide.

Sec. 74195. DAAM.

Sec. 74196. L-Alanyl L-glutamine.

Sec. 74197. Granular acrylamido-tert-butyl sulfonic acid (ATBS).

Sec. 74198. Glycyl-L-glutamine hydrate.

Sec. 74199. Noviflumuron.

Sec. 74200. Propanil technical.

Sec. 74201. Hexaflumuron.

Sec. 74202. Stabilizer for plastics and rubber.

Sec. 74203. 2-Amino-5-chloro-N,3-dimethylbenzamide.

Sec. 74204. Glycyl-L-tyrosine dihydrate.

Sec. 74205. L-Alanyl-L-tyrosine.

Sec. 74206. Enzalutamide ITS-2.

Sec. 74207. 4-Bromo-2-fluoro-N-methylbenzamide.

Sec. 74208. N-Boc-1-aminocyclobutanecarboxylic acid.

Sec. 74209. N′-(1,3-dimethylbutylidene)-3-hydroxy-2-naphthohydrazide (BMH) (oil treated).

Sec. 74210. Guanidine sulfamate.

Sec. 74211. Liquid, blocked cycloaliphatic diamine used as crosslinker for polyisocyanate resins.

Sec. 74212. 3,4-Difluorobenzonitrile.

Sec. 74213. 2-Amino-5-cyano-N,3-dimethylbenzamide.

Sec. 74214. TFMPA.

Sec. 74215. Dimethyl 2,2′-Azobisisobutyrate.

Sec. 74216. Antioxidant/metal deactivator.

Sec. 74217. Benzyl carbazate.

Sec. 74218. Benzene-1,3-dicarbohydrazide.

Sec. 74219. Input for resins, coatings, and other products.

Sec. 74220. Aldicarb.

Sec. 74221. Flubendiamide.

Sec. 74222. Benzobicyclon.

Sec. 74223. Diphenylsulfone (DPS).

Sec. 74224. Phenolic antioxidant.

Sec. 74225. Phenolic antioxidant and heat stabilizer.

Sec. 74226. Phenylchlorothioformate (PTCFM).

Sec. 74227. Methylene bis thiocyanate.

Sec. 74228. Oxamyl.

Sec. 74229. L-Cystine.

Sec. 74230. L-Cysteine.

Sec. 74231. N,N′-Bis-L-alanyl-L-cystine.

Sec. 74232. Lubricant additive.

Sec. 74233. Sodium benzenesulfinate.

Sec. 74234. Thio-ether based co-stabilizer for plastics.

Sec. 74235. L-Cysteine hydrate hydrochloride.

Sec. 74236. Dimercaprol.

Sec. 74237. Monoammonium salt of glyphosate.

Sec. 74238. THPC.

Sec. 74239. Flame retardant for textiles.

Sec. 74240. Glyphosate.

Sec. 74241. Ethephon.

Sec. 74242. Benzene phosphinic acid.

Sec. 74243. HEDP.

Sec. 74244. Trimethylchlorosilane.

Sec. 74245. Chloro-(chloromethyl)-dimethylsilane.

Sec. 74246. Silicone for electronics cleaners.

Sec. 74247. Silicon carrier fluid for active lotions, creams.

Sec. 74248. Vinyltrimethoxysilane.

Sec. 74249. n-Octyltriethoxysilane.

Sec. 74250. Dimethylbis(s-butylamino)silane.

Sec. 74251. Aqueous solution of potassium methyl siliconate.

Sec. 74252. Octyltrimethoxysilane.

Sec. 74253. Octlytriethoxysilane.

Sec. 74254. Amino-propyl-triethoxysilane.

Sec. 74255. Methyltris(sec-butylamino)silane.

Sec. 74256. Methyltris(methylethylketoximino)silane (MOS).

Sec. 74257. Heptamethyltrisiloxane.

Sec. 74258. Tetramethyldisiloxane.

Sec. 74259. Dimethylchlorosilane.

Sec. 74260. Dichloromethylsilane.

Sec. 74261. Tris(TFP)-methylcyclo-trisiloxane DR.

Sec. 74262. Tetravinyltetramethylcyclotetrasiloxane.

Sec. 74263. Divinyltetramethyldisiloxane.

Sec. 74264. Input for plant protection agent.

Sec. 74265. Strawberry furanone.

Sec. 74266. Emamectin benzoate.

Sec. 74267. Gibberellic acid.

Sec. 74268. Rose oxide.

Sec. 74269. Vinylene carbonate.

Sec. 74270. Kasugamycin technical.

Sec. 74271. 2H-Cyclododeca[b]pyran.

Sec. 74272. Bixafen.

Sec. 74273. Fluxapyroxad.

Sec. 74274. 3,5 Dimethylpyrazole.

Sec. 74275. Pyraclonil.

Sec. 74276. Imidazolidinyl urea.

Sec. 74277. Allantoin.

Sec. 74278. Emulsifiable concentrate of Imazalil fungicide.

Sec. 74279. Technical cyazofamid fungicide.

Sec. 74280. Imazalil sulfate.

Sec. 74281. 1,2-Dimethylimidazole.

Sec. 74282. 2-Methylimidazole flakes.

Sec. 74283. Diazolidinyl urea.

Sec. 74284. 1-(2-Aminoethyl)imidazolidin-2-one (AEEU).

Sec. 74285. Zinc pyrithione.

Sec. 74286. Technical Pyriofenone fungicide.

Sec. 74287. Picoxystrobin.

Sec. 74288. Triclopyr BEE.

Sec. 74289. Imazapyr.

Sec. 74290. Tetraniliprole.

Sec. 74291. Cyantraniliprole.

Sec. 74292. Chlorantraniliprole.

Sec. 74293. Chlorpyrifos.

Sec. 74294. Technical Cyclaniliprole insecticide.

Sec. 74295. Regorafenib.

Sec. 74296. N-Butyl-TAD.

Sec. 74297. Hindered amine light stabilizer and phenolic antioxidant.

Sec. 74298. 4-Hydroxy-TEMPO.

Sec. 74299. 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-4-ol (TMP).

Sec. 74300. 5-Bromo-2-(3-chloropyridin-2-yl)pyrazole-3-carboxylic acid.

Sec. 74301. 2-Chloro-5-(trifluoromethyl)pyridine.

Sec. 74302. Picarbutrox.

Sec. 74303. 5-amino-3-(trifluromethyl) picolinonitrile (T3630).

Sec. 74304. Dextromethorphan hydrobromide.

Sec. 74305. Ipflufenoquin.

Sec. 74306. THQ.

Sec. 74307. Pyrithiobac sodium.

Sec. 74308. Larotrectinib sulfate.

Sec. 74309. Ibrutinib.

Sec. 74310. Orthosulfamuron.

Sec. 74311. 5-Bromopyrimidine.

Sec. 74312. Butylthion.

Sec. 74313. P-1062.

Sec. 74314. Carfentrazone Technical.

Sec. 74315. UV absorber 928.

Sec. 74316. UV absorber for industrial coatings.

Sec. 74317. Uniconazole-P.

Sec. 74318. VcMMAE.

Sec. 74319. UVA 360.

Sec. 74320. Trofinetide.

Sec. 74321. Flurazole.

Sec. 74322. Oxathiapiprolin.

Sec. 74323. Certain antimicrobial.

Sec. 74324. Rubber accelerator.

Sec. 74325. 2-Amino benzothiazole.

Sec. 74326. Technical Isofetamid fungicide.

Sec. 74327. Clomazone Technical.

Sec. 74328. NEM salt.

Sec. 74329. AMTC wet cake.

Sec. 74330. Photoinitiator 369.

Sec. 74331. Isatoic anhydride.

Sec. 74332. Oclacitinib maleate.

Sec. 74333. Thiencarbazone-methyl.

Sec. 74334. Penoxsulam technical herbicide.

Sec. 74335. Ethyl 2-sulfamoylbenzoate.

Sec. 74336. Sulfosulfuron.

Sec. 74337. Pyrimisulfan.

Sec. 74338. Purified steviol glycoside, rebaudioside A.

Sec. 74339. Glucosylated steviol glycosides.

Sec. 74340. Hydroxypropyl gamma cyclodextrin.

Sec. 74341. Hydroxypropylated beta cyclodextrin.

Sec. 74342. Methyl beta cyclodextrin.

Sec. 74343. 2′-Fucosyllactose.

Sec. 74344. Ascorbyl glucoside.

Sec. 74345. Dimethylamine borane (DMAB).

Sec. 74346. Elderberry extract concentrate.

Sec. 74347. Disperse Yellow 241.

Sec. 74348. Disperse Orange.

Sec. 74349. Mixtures of Disperse Yellow FD11843 and acetic acid.

Sec. 74350. Disperse Blue 54.

Sec. 74351. Mixtures of several disperse dyes.

Sec. 74352. Mixtures of 4 disperse blue dyes.

Sec. 74353. Mixtures of 4 dyes.

Sec. 74354. Disperse Red 86.

Sec. 74355. Disperse Violet 1.

Sec. 74356. Disperse Blue 60.

Sec. 74357. Mixtures of Disperse Orange 29, Disperse Red 167:1, and Disperse Blue 56.

Sec. 74358. Disperse Yellow 54.

Sec. 74359. Acid Violet 48.

Sec. 74360. Acid Blue 280.

Sec. 74361. Acid Brown 282.

Sec. 74362. Acid Red 131.

Sec. 74363. Acid Red 249.

Sec. 74364. Acid Yellow 236.

Sec. 74365. Acid Red 407.

Sec. 74366. Acid Yellow 220.

Sec. 74367. Acid Yellow 232.

Sec. 74368. Acid Yellow 235.

Sec. 74369. Acid Yellow 151.

Sec. 74370. Acid Violet 43.

Sec. 74371. Acid Red 33.

Sec. 74372. Acid Black 52.

Sec. 74373. Acid Black 2.

Sec. 74374. Acid Green 25.

Sec. 74375. Basic Brown 23.

Sec. 74376. Basic Violet 11:1 rhodamine dye.

Sec. 74377. Basic Yellow 37.

Sec. 74378. Basic Violet 3.

Sec. 74379. Direct Orange 118.

Sec. 74380. Direct Blue 86.

Sec. 74381. Direct Blue 199.

Sec. 74382. Direct Black 168.

Sec. 74383. Direct Red 227.

Sec. 74384. Direct Yellow 107.

Sec. 74385. Direct Green 26.

Sec. 74386. Direct Yellow 11.

Sec. 74387. Direct Orange 15.

Sec. 74388. Direct Brown 44.

Sec. 74389. Direct Red 81.

Sec. 74390. Direct Yellow 142.

Sec. 74391. Direct Red 80.

Sec. 74392. Direct Red 16.

Sec. 74393. Direct Red 254.

Sec. 74394. Colorant.

Sec. 74395. Direct Yellow 34.

Sec. 74396. Vat Orange 2 dye powder.

Sec. 74397. Vat Violet 13 dye.

Sec. 74398. Vat Brown 3 dye.

Sec. 74399. Vat Red 10 dye powder.

Sec. 74400. Vat Brown 57 dye.

Sec. 74401. Vat Red 31 dye powder.

Sec. 74402. Dye mixtures of Vat Brown 3 and Vat Black 27.

Sec. 74403. Vat Red 13.

Sec. 74404. Vat Yellow 2 dye powder.

Sec. 74405. Vat Yellow 33 dye.

Sec. 74406. Vat Green 1 dye.

Sec. 74407. Vat Green 3.

Sec. 74408. Vat Blue 6 dye.

Sec. 74409. Vat Blue 20 dye.

Sec. 74410. Vat Violet 1.

Sec. 74411. Vat Brown 1 dye.

Sec. 74412. Vat Black 16 dye.

Sec. 74413. Vat Black 25.

Sec. 74414. Vat Black 27.

Sec. 74415. Reactive Yellow 145.

Sec. 74416. Reactive Red 195.

Sec. 74417. Reactive Blue 49.

Sec. 74418. Reactive Blue 72.

Sec. 74419. Reactive Yellow 95 powder.

Sec. 74420. Reactive Red 245.

Sec. 74421. Reactive Brown 11.

Sec. 74422. Mixtures of Reactive Black 5 (Na) (FKP), Reactive Scarlet F01–0439, and Reactive Orange 131.

Sec. 74423. Reactive Yellow F98–0159.

Sec. 74424. Dye mixtures of Reactive Orange 131 and Reactive Scarlet F07–0522.

Sec. 74425. Reactive Black 31.

Sec. 74426. Reactive Red 120.

Sec. 74427. Reactive Blue 5.

Sec. 74428. Reactive Orange 13.

Sec. 74429. Reactive Orange 12.

Sec. 74430. Pigment Red 177.

Sec. 74431. Pigment Yellow 110.

Sec. 74432. Pigment Yellow 147.

Sec. 74433. Pigment Orange 64.

Sec. 74434. Pigment Blue 29.

Sec. 74435. Pigment Violet 15.

Sec. 74436. Pigment Blue 14.

Sec. 74437. Solvent Blue 97.

Sec. 74438. Solvent Green 5.

Sec. 74439. Solvent Yellow 98.

Sec. 74440. Solvent Green 7.

Sec. 74441. Solvent Red 195.

Sec. 74442. Solvent Orange 115.

Sec. 74443. Specialty dyes.

Sec. 74444. Solvent Green 3.

Sec. 74445. Solvent Blue 36.

Sec. 74446. Mixtures of Solvent Green 3.

Sec. 74447. Solvent Red 52.

Sec. 74448. Solvent Red 149.

Sec. 74449. Solvent Red 207.

Sec. 74450. Solvent Violet 14.

Sec. 74451. Solvent Yellow 179.

Sec. 74452. Solvent Yellow 131.

Sec. 74453. Hogen Blue XB-20.

Sec. 74454. Solvent Yellow 104.

Sec. 74455. Combination of Fluorescent Brighteners 367 and 371.

Sec. 74456. Fluorescent Brightener CBS-X.

Sec. 74457. Optical Brightener SWN.

Sec. 74458. C.I. Fluorescent Brightener 199:1.

Sec. 74459. Fluorescent Brightener 368.

Sec. 74460. 1,4-Bis(2-cyanostyryl)benzene.

Sec. 74461. Certain manufacturing inputs.

Sec. 74462. Cerium sulfide pigments.

Sec. 74463. Matte pearlescent pigments.

Sec. 74464. Angle-dependent interference pigments.

Sec. 74465. Inorganic Lumilux.

Sec. 74466. Ribbon/Matrix Resin.

Sec. 74467. Bonding agent 2005.

Sec. 74468. Fluoropolymer resin.

Sec. 74469. Zirconium 12 paint drier.

Sec. 74470. Zirconium 24 paint drier.

Sec. 74471. Drier accelerators.

Sec. 74472. Lemon oil.

Sec. 74473. Sulfonic acids, C14–17-sec-alkane, sodium salt.

Sec. 74474. Potassium ethyl octylphosphonate.

Sec. 74475. Intermediate in the production of industrial lubricants.

Sec. 74476. Polyether dispersant.

Sec. 74477. D-Glucopyranose.

Sec. 74478. 2-Dodecoxy-6-(hydroxymethyl)oxane-3,4,5-triol.

Sec. 74479. Mixtures of certain C12–14-alkyl ethers.

Sec. 74480. Manufacturing chemical.

Sec. 74481. Nonionic surfactant.

Sec. 74482. Chemical used in textile manufacturing.

Sec. 74483. Ethoxylated tristyrylphenol phosphate potassium salt.

Sec. 74484. Sodium polycarboxylate, aqueous solution.

Sec. 74485. Aqueous emulsion of a mixture of amine soaps and miscellaneous other additives.

Sec. 74486. Aqueous dispersion of a mixture of fatty amine and amide soaps and miscellaneous other additives.

Sec. 74487. Aqueous dispersion of a mixture of fatty amine and amide soaps and miscellaneous other additives.

Sec. 74488. Photographic gelatin.

Sec. 74489. Ice fountains (class 1.4G).

Sec. 74490. Magic candles containing magnesium powder.

Sec. 74491. Party snappers (Class 1.4G).

Sec. 74492. Fenpyroximate 5SC.

Sec. 74493. Pyrifluquinazon 20SC.

Sec. 74494. Imidacloprid and Muscalure formulations.

Sec. 74495. Formulations of acephate and bifenthrin.

Sec. 74496. Fipronil.

Sec. 74497. Aluminum phosphide.

Sec. 74498. Magnaphos formulations.

Sec. 74499. Formulated oxamyl.

Sec. 74500. Formulated fungicides.

Sec. 74501. Certain fungicides.

Sec. 74502. Prothioconazole, Fluopyram, and Trifloxystrobin fungicides.

Sec. 74503. Prothioconazole, Metalaxyl, and Tebuconazole fungicides.

Sec. 74504. Mancozeb and Chlorothalonil formulations.

Sec. 74505. Mixtures of Picarbutrox and application adjuvants.

Sec. 74506. Mixtures of Tetraconazole and application adjuvants.

Sec. 74507. Mancozeb and Azoxystrobin formulations.

Sec. 74508. Mixtures of Cymoxanil and fumed dioxosilane.

Sec. 74509. Microthiol formulations.

Sec. 74510. Formulations of thiencarbazone-methyl, Iodosulfuron-methyl-sodium, and dicamba.

Sec. 74511. Thiencarbazone-methyl, Isoxadifenethyl, and Tembotrione herbicides.

Sec. 74512. Herbicides used on grasses.

Sec. 74513. Thiencarbazone-methyl, Isoxaflutole, and Cyprosulfamide herbicides.

Sec. 74514. Thiencarbazone-methyl and Iodosulfuron-methylsodium herbicides.

Sec. 74515. Thiencarbazone-methyl and Mefenpyr-diethyl herbicides.

Sec. 74516. Thifensulfuron-methyl and Tribenuron-methyl formulations.

Sec. 74517. Tribenuron-methyl formulations.

Sec. 74518. Chlorsulfuron and metsulfuron-methyl formulations.

Sec. 74519. Thifensulfuron-methyl and Fluroxypyr formulations.

Sec. 74520. Aciflurofen formulations.

Sec. 74521. S-Metolachlor and Mestrione herbicides.

Sec. 74522. Metribuzin formulations.

Sec. 74523. Pendimethaline and Metribuzine formulations.

Sec. 74524. Formulations of S-Metolachlor and Metribuzin.

Sec. 74525. Thifensulfuron-methyl and Tribenuron-methyl formulations.

Sec. 74526. Metsulfuron-methyl formulations.

Sec. 74527. Chlorimuron-ethyl formulations.

Sec. 74528. Mixtures of Bromoxynil octanoate and Bromoxynil heptanoate.

Sec. 74529. Sulfometuron-methyl and Metsulfuron-methyl formulations.

Sec. 74530. Chlorimuron-ethyl and Tribenuron-methyl formulations.

Sec. 74531. Formulations containing Tiafenacil.

Sec. 74532. Diuron 80.

Sec. 74533. Flazasulfuron herbicides.

Sec. 74534. Thifensulfuron-methyl formulations.

Sec. 74535. Herbicide for farm and ranch use.

Sec. 74536. Propanil formulations.

Sec. 74537. Thifensulfuron formulations.

Sec. 74538. Tolpyralate and Nicosulfuron herbicides.

Sec. 74539. Mixtures of magnesium salts and application adjuvants.

Sec. 74540. Nisin formulations.

Sec. 74541. Certain fixatives.

Sec. 74542. Fuel oil additives: cold flow improvers containing poly(ethylene-co-ethenyl acetate).

Sec. 74543. Fuel oil additives: cold flow improvers containing fumarate vinyl acetate co-polymer.

Sec. 74544. Crude oil additives: cold flow improvers containing fumarate vinyl acetate copolymer.

Sec. 74545. Pour point depressants.

Sec. 74546. Fuel oil additives: cold flow improvers containing poly (ethylene-co-ethenyl acetate and vinyl 2-ethyl hexanoate).

Sec. 74547. Poly(isobutylene) hydroformylation products.

Sec. 74548. Input for rubber products.

Sec. 74549. Mixtures of oligomers as general antioxidants for rubber tires.

Sec. 74550. Benzene, 2,4-diisocyanato-1,3,5-tris(1-methylethyl)-, homopolymer.

Sec. 74551. Aromatic amine antioxidants.

Sec. 74552. Antioxidant blends.

Sec. 74553. Antioxidant blends to protect polymers.

Sec. 74554. Synthetic hydrotalcite coated with fatty acid and magnesium stearate.

Sec. 74555. Silica scorch retarders and polymerization inhibitors.

Sec. 74556. Synthetic hydrotalcite.

Sec. 74557. Light stabilizers for construction products.

Sec. 74558. Light stabilizer for plastics.

Sec. 74559. Preparations of bis(2,4-dichlorobenzoyl) peroxide 50 percent paste.

Sec. 74560. Distilled tall oils.

Sec. 74561. Pyridine, alkyl derivatives.

Sec. 74562. Polyisocyanate crosslinking agents.

Sec. 74563. Bonding agent mixtures.

Sec. 74564. Liquid, chemically modified amine complex of boron trifluoride.

Sec. 74565. Phthalocyanine derivative.

Sec. 74566. Mixtures of Cocamidopropyl betaine, glycol distearate, Laureth-4, and water.

Sec. 74567. Mixtures of tall oil mono-, di-, and triglycerides.

Sec. 74568. Tallow-bis(2-hydroxyethyl) amines.

Sec. 74569. Additive mixtures for metalworking fluids.

Sec. 74570. Naphthenic acids.

Sec. 74571. Hydroxytyrosol powders.

Sec. 74572. Secondary alcohol ethoxylates.

Sec. 74573. Ethylene glycol dimerate.

Sec. 74574. Two-part liquid silicone kits.

Sec. 74575. Hydrophobic precipitated silica.

Sec. 74576. Silane, trimethoxyoctyl-, hydrolysis products.

Sec. 74577. 1,1,1-Trimethyl-N-(trimethylsilyl)silanamine hydrolysis products.

Sec. 74578. Waterborne epoxy curing agents.

Sec. 74579. Preparations based on 1-phenylicosane-1,3-dione.

Sec. 74580. Mixtures of 2-Mercaptopropionic acid, methyl ester, O-ethyl dithiocarbonate.

Sec. 74581. Epoxy curing agents.

Sec. 74582. Aliphatic amine curing agents.

Sec. 74583. Non-halogenated flame retardants.

Sec. 74584. Ligaphob N 90.

Sec. 74585. Organomodified siloxane.

Sec. 74586. Methyl palmitate-stearate, hydrogenated.

Sec. 74587. Olfine E1010.

Sec. 74588. Certain non-halogenated flame retardants.

Sec. 74589. Flame retardants.

Sec. 74590. Preparations based on acetyl hexapeptide-8 and pentapeptide-18.

Sec. 74591. Lithium silicon oxide.

Sec. 74592. Branched olefin from propylene polymerization.

Sec. 74593. Polypropylene pellets.

Sec. 74594. Propylene-ethylene copolymer.

Sec. 74595. Ethylene-propylene copolymers.

Sec. 74596. Benzene alkylated with polypropylene.

Sec. 74597. Chlorinated polyolefin.

Sec. 74598. Adsorbent resin.

Sec. 74599. Vinyl chloride-hydroxypropyl acrylate copolymer.

Sec. 74600. Vinyl chloride ethylene copolymer with hydrophic properties.

Sec. 74601. Fluids with boiling points above 170 °C.

Sec. 74602. Formulations of functionalized perfluoropolyether.

Sec. 74603. Perfluoropolyether-urethane acrylate.

Sec. 74604. PVDF homopolymer/PVDF/CTFE copolymer mixtures.

Sec. 74605. Chemically modified PVDF.

Sec. 74606. Fluoropolymer, fluoroethylene-alkyl vinylether alternative copolymers.

Sec. 74607. Copolymer of vinyl acetate and higher vinyl esters.

Sec. 74608. Food-grade vinyl acetate copolymer.

Sec. 74609. Vinyl chloride ethylene with enhanced properties.

Sec. 74610. Vinyl acetate ethylene copolymer with enhanced properties.

Sec. 74611. Food-grade polyvinyl acetate homopolymers.

Sec. 74612. Acrylic acid/vinylsulphonate random copolymers.

Sec. 74613. Poly(methyl methacrylate) microspheres.

Sec. 74614. Methyl methacrylate crosspolymer microspheres.

Sec. 74615. Styrene acrylate copolymer with enhanced properties.

Sec. 74616. Copolymer for dental use.

Sec. 74617. Vinyl phosphonic acid, acrylic acid copolymer, 20 percent solution in water.

Sec. 74618. Polyacrylate 33.

Sec. 74619. AA/AMPS copolymer.

Sec. 74620. Flocculant dry polyacrylamides.

Sec. 74621. Sorbitol, propylene oxide, ethylene oxide polymer.

Sec. 74622. Trimethoxysilylpropylcarbamate-terminated polyether.

Sec. 74623. Dimethoxy(methyl)silylmethylcarbamate-terminated polyether.

Sec. 74624. Curing agent is used in two- or three-parts epoxy systems.

Sec. 74625. Polyethylene glycol 450.

Sec. 74626. Medicinal intermediate for investigational use.

Sec. 74627. Pegcetacoplan.

Sec. 74628. Aqueous solutions of carboxylic acid-copolymer-salt in water.

Sec. 74629. Aqueous solutions of a modified polymer bearing hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups.

Sec. 74630. Dimethylamine/epichlorohydrin/ethylenediamine copolymer.

Sec. 74631. Linear hydroxyl-terminated aliphatic polycarb diol.

Sec. 74632. Short hollow PET fibers.

Sec. 74633. Polytetrahydrofuran.

Sec. 74634. Crystalline polyesters.

Sec. 74635. Liquid crystal polymers.

Sec. 74636. Branched polyesters.

Sec. 74637. High molecular weight co-polyester.

Sec. 74638. High molecular weight co-polyester.

Sec. 74639. Polyester-polyamide dispersants.

Sec. 74640. Nylon-12 micro-spheres.

Sec. 74641. Short nylon-66 fibers.

Sec. 74642. Short nylon 6 fibers, colored.

Sec. 74643. Short triangular nylon 6 fibers.

Sec. 74644. Short star-shaped nylon 6 fibers.

Sec. 74645. Short heart-shaped nylon 6 fibers.

Sec. 74646. PA510 polymer compounds.

Sec. 74647. MXD6 polymer compounds.

Sec. 74648. PA10T polymer compounds.

Sec. 74649. PA10T/10I polymer compounds.

Sec. 74650. Polyurethane aqueous resins.

Sec. 74651. Aqueous resin.

Sec. 74652. Aliphatic polyisocyanate.

Sec. 74653. IPDI and HDI based aliphatic polyisocyanate.

Sec. 74654. HDI/Trimethylol hexyllactone crosspolymer micro-spheres.

Sec. 74655. HDI/PPG/Polycaprolactone crosspolymer micro-spheres.

Sec. 74656. Aromatic isocyanate prepolymer.

Sec. 74657. Blocked polyisocyanate containing solvent.

Sec. 74658. Polyisocyanate adduct for powder coatings.

Sec. 74659. Blocked polyisocyanate for use in can and coil applications.

Sec. 74660. Polydimethylsiloxane.

Sec. 74661. Silicone resins.

Sec. 74662. Methoxyfunctional methyl-phenyl polysiloxane.

Sec. 74663. Hydrogenpolysiloxane.

Sec. 74664. Methyl silicone resins.

Sec. 74665. Trimethylsiloxysilicate.

Sec. 74666. Epoxy functional polydimethylsiloxane.

Sec. 74667. Polymethylhydrogensiloxane.

Sec. 74668. Vinyl terminated siloxanes.

Sec. 74669. Silicone hybrid resin (solvent free).

Sec. 74670. Hydrogenated polycyclopentadiene resin.

Sec. 74671. Water dispersable HDI based polyisocyanate.

Sec. 74672. Cyanate ester resins for high-end electronic, aerospace, and industrial applications.

Sec. 74673. Polyethyleneimine, component used in manufacturing medical devices.

Sec. 74674. Polyhexanide.

Sec. 74675. Ethylene-norbornene copolymer.

Sec. 74676. Cellulose powder.

Sec. 74677. Polymaltotriose.

Sec. 74678. Chitosan.

Sec. 74679. Plastic drinking straws.

Sec. 74680. Garden hoses.

Sec. 74681. Plastic fittings of perfluoroalkoxy.

Sec. 74682. Low density polyethylene (LDPE) sheeting.

Sec. 74683. Biaxially oriented dielectric polypropylene film.

Sec. 74684. Biaxially oriented polypropylene (BOPP) capacitor-grade film.

Sec. 74685. Polyester capacitor-grade film.

Sec. 74686. Acid form membranes.

Sec. 74687. Melamine resin foam.

Sec. 74688. Infant bathtubs and basins, of plastics.

Sec. 74689. Boxes, cases, crates, and similar articles of plastics.

Sec. 74690. Nozzles, black, of polypropylene.

Sec. 74691. Tip/cap combinations of polyethylene.

Sec. 74692. Bottles made of LDPE.

Sec. 74693. Plastic nasal irrigator caps for neti pots.

Sec. 74694. Toy character bottle toppers.

Sec. 74695. Melamine platters, other than those presented in sets.

Sec. 74696. Melamine plates, other than those presented in sets.

Sec. 74697. Melamine bowls not presented in sets.

Sec. 74698. Melamine trays not presented in sets.

Sec. 74699. Plastic measuring cups and spoons in sets.

Sec. 74700. Liquid measuring cups.

Sec. 74701. Self-anchoring beverage containers.

Sec. 74702. PVC infant bathtub mats.

Sec. 74703. Reversible playmats.

Sec. 74704. Craft mats.

Sec. 74705. Hangers.

Sec. 74706. Infant bath rinsing cups.

Sec. 74707. Bathtub spout covers.

Sec. 74708. Infant teethers.

Sec. 74709. Lighted dog fetch toys.

Sec. 74710. Certain thermoplastic nylon 3-gang switch wallplates.

Sec. 74711. Manual plastic disposable cutlery dispensers.

Sec. 74712. Ear bulb syringes of clear silicone.

Sec. 74713. PVC inflatable pillows.

Sec. 74714. Self-inflatable queen air mattresses.

Sec. 74715. Plastic clip fasteners.

Sec. 74716. Self-venting spouts for diesel exhaust fluid.

Sec. 74717. Plastic pet carriers.

Sec. 74718. Plastic mixing tips.

Sec. 74719. Cable ties of plastics.

Sec. 74720. Flexible camera mountings.

Sec. 74721. Three-piece camera mount sets.

Sec. 74722. Magnetic swivel clips for cameras.

Sec. 74723. Helmet camera mounts.

Sec. 74724. Short extension poles for use with cameras.

Sec. 74725. Long extension poles for cameras.

Sec. 74726. Swivel mounts for cameras.

Sec. 74727. Tripod camera mounts.

Sec. 74728. Bulk hydraulic hoses.

Sec. 74729. Brake hydraulic hoses.

Sec. 74730. Bulk fabric/metal-reinforced rubber hoses.

Sec. 74731. Disposable gloves.

Sec. 74732. Reusable gloves.

Sec. 74733. Dog and cat apparel.

Sec. 74734. Polycarbonate vanity cases.

Sec. 74735. Aluminum vanity cases.

Sec. 74736. Suitcases with outer surface of aluminum with built-in zipper locks.

Sec. 74737. Drawstring backpacks with zippered pocket.

Sec. 74738. Laminated recycled reusable shopping tote bags.

Sec. 74739. Tote bags of paper yarn.

Sec. 74740. Reusable shopping style tote bags.

Sec. 74741. Waterproof tote bags.

Sec. 74742. Waterproof duffle bags.

Sec. 74743. Waterproof zippered bags, without handles, of plastic sheeting.

Sec. 74744. Waterproof backpacks.

Sec. 74745. Waterproof waist packs.

Sec. 74746. Guitar cases.

Sec. 74747. Jewelry boxes.

Sec. 74748. Silicone rubber camera cases with straps.

Sec. 74749. Leather gloves with flip mitts for hunting.

Sec. 74750. Men's leather gloves valued at $18 or more per pair.

Sec. 74751. Belts of calf skin.

Sec. 74752. Bamboo engineered flooring: 12.5–12.9 mm thick.

Sec. 74753. Bamboo engineered flooring: 14.1–14.5 mm thick.

Sec. 74754. Bamboo engineered flooring: 15.7–16.1 mm thick.

Sec. 74755. Strand bamboo flooring: 12.5–12.9 mm thick.

Sec. 74756. Strand bamboo flooring: 14.1–14.5 mm thick.

Sec. 74757. Strand bamboo flooring: 10.9–11.3 mm thick.

Sec. 74758. Chopsticks made of bamboo.

Sec. 74759. Drying racks of wood.

Sec. 74760. Bamboo skewers.

Sec. 74761. Wood blinds with louvered slats.

Sec. 74762. 100 percent cotton woven crimped unbleached fabric.

Sec. 74763. Woven fabrics of cotton, containing 85 percent or more by weight of cotton, not more than 200 grams per square meter.

Sec. 74764. 100 percent cotton woven bleached fabric pieces, open weave.

Sec. 74765. Incontinence underpad fabrics of cotton.

Sec. 74766. Woven fabrics of cotton with an average yarn number between 55 and 60.

Sec. 74767. Woven fabric of cotton of yarn number 69 or higher.

Sec. 74768. Woven fabrics of cotton with an average yarn number exceeding 68.

Sec. 74769. Incontinence underpad fabrics, cotton, plain weave, of yarn number 42 or lower.

Sec. 74770. Incontinence underpad fabrics, cotton, plain weave, of yarn number between 43 and 68.

Sec. 74771. Incontinence underpad fabrics, bleached.

Sec. 74772. Incontinence underpad fabrics, printed.

Sec. 74773. Untwisted filament polyvinyl alcohol yarn, measuring 1,100 to 1,330 decitex.

Sec. 74774. Untwisted filament polyvinyl alcohol yarn.

Sec. 74775. Polypropylene (PP) monofilament.

Sec. 74776. Acrylic fiber tow with an average decitex of 0.9.

Sec. 74777. Black polyester bi-component fibers.

Sec. 74778. Acrylic staple fibers with an average decitex of 2.2, fiber length of 100 mm.

Sec. 74779. Modacrylic staple fibers not processed for spinning.

Sec. 74780. Short polypropylene fibers.

Sec. 74781. Polyoxadiazole fibers.

Sec. 74782. Artificial staple fibers of viscose rayon, 38–42 mm in length.

Sec. 74783. Artificial fibers of viscose rayon for the manufacture of feminine hygiene products.

Sec. 74784. Flame retardant rayon fibers, measuring 4.78 decitex.

Sec. 74785. Flame retardant rayon fibers, measuring 4.55 decitex.

Sec. 74786. Flame retardant rayon fibers, measuring 4.4 decitex.

Sec. 74787. Other flame retardant rayon fibers.

Sec. 74788. Cellulosic man-made viscose rayon staple fibers, measuring 1.3–1.5 decitex.

Sec. 74789. Viscose rayon staple fibers, measuring 1.5–1.67 decitex, with a fiber length of 38–42 mm.

Sec. 74790. Cellulosic man-made viscose rayon staple fibers, measuring 1.67–2 decitex.

Sec. 74791. Viscose rayon staple fibers, measuring 1–2 decitex, with a fiber length of 4–8 mm.

Sec. 74792. Viscose staple fibers used in textile, medical, or hygiene applications.

Sec. 74793. Viscose rayon staple fibers, measuring 1.51–2 decitex, with a fiber length of 8–16 mm.

Sec. 74794. Viscose rayon staple fibers, measuring 1–1.5 decitex, with a fiber length of 8–16 mm.

Sec. 74795. Flame retardant viscose rayon staple fibers, with a decitex of 4.7 mm and a fiber length of 51–60 mm.

Sec. 74796. Viscose rayon staple fibers for nonwoven production.

Sec. 74797. Black viscose rayon staple fibers.

Sec. 74798. Acrylic or modacrylic staple fibers with a decitex of 3–5.6.

Sec. 74799. Made up hand-cast string-drawn fishing nets.

Sec. 74800. Knitted carpets containing 75 percent or more of cotton, with a rubber backing.

Sec. 74801. Knitted carpets containing 75 percent or more by weight of polyester, with a rubber backing.

Sec. 74802. Faux leather fabrics.

Sec. 74803. Grass catcher bags.

Sec. 74804. Oxygenation membrane capillary material.

Sec. 74805. Textile knitted fabrics composed of micromodal and elastane.

Sec. 74806. Textile technical knitted fabrics combining technical cotton and elastane.

Sec. 74807. Textile knit fabrics of modal, cashmere, and spandex.

Sec. 74808. Women’s and girls' dresses, knitted or crocheted, of synthetic fibers infused with minerals.

Sec. 74809. Women’s and girls' skirts and divided skirts of synthetic fibers infused with minerals.

Sec. 74810. Women's and girls' knit cardigans or pullovers containing 70 percent or more of silk.

Sec. 74811. Men's and boys' knit cardigans or pullovers of linen.

Sec. 74812. Babies' knit sweaters, pullovers, sweatshirts, waistcoats (vests), and cardigans, of artificial fibers.

Sec. 74813. Women’s and girls' tops, knitted or crocheted, of man-made fibers infused with minerals.

Sec. 74814. Men’s and boy’s tops, knitted or crocheted, of man-made fibers infused with minerals.

Sec. 74815. Men's 3 mm wetsuits.

Sec. 74816. Men's 5.5 and 6.5 mm wetsuits.

Sec. 74817. Men's 3.5 mm wetsuits.

Sec. 74818. Men's 4.5 mm wetsuits.

Sec. 74819. Women's 3 mm wetsuits.

Sec. 74820. Women's 3.5 mm wetsuits.

Sec. 74821. Women's 4.5 mm wetsuits.

Sec. 74822. Women's 5.5 and 6.5 mm wetsuits.

Sec. 74823. Insulated handmuffs of knit polyester.

Sec. 74824. Men's stockingfoot wader bottom subassemblies, of compressed neoprene.

Sec. 74825. Men's stockingfoot wader bottom subassemblies, of non-compressed neoprene.

Sec. 74826. Fishing wader pocket pouch assemblies.

Sec. 74827. Women's coats of man-made woven fibers.

Sec. 74828. Men's or boys' linen woven trousers.

Sec. 74829. Men's or boys' linen woven shorts.

Sec. 74830. Martial arts uniforms.

Sec. 74831. Women's dresses of woven viscose.

Sec. 74832. Girls' woven cotton corduroy trousers.

Sec. 74833. Women's woven waffle shirts.

Sec. 74834. Babies' woven artificial fiber shirts and blouses.

Sec. 74835. Babies' artificial fiber woven jumpsuits, coveralls, dresses, skirts, skirtalls, or clothing accessories.

Sec. 74836. Women's or girls' linen woven blouses, shirts and shirt-blouses, and sleeveless tank styles.

Sec. 74837. Women's or girls' linen woven washsuits, sunsuits, or one-piece playsuits.

Sec. 74838. Women's or girls' linen woven coveralls or jumpsuits.

Sec. 74839. Women's shawls and similar goods, 100 percent silk.

Sec. 74840. Winter cycling gloves.

Sec. 74841. Mattress protectors with toppers.

Sec. 74842. Printed mattress protectors.

Sec. 74843. Lock pocket tents.

Sec. 74844. Dark room tents.

Sec. 74845. Air tube chambered tents.

Sec. 74846. Bi-component microfiber tube mop refills.

Sec. 74847. Microfiber duster refills.

Sec. 74848. RFID mop pads.

Sec. 74849. Microfiber cleaning cloths.

Sec. 74850. Microfiber mop pads.

Sec. 74851. Golf bag bodies with rain hoods and straps.

Sec. 74852. Pillow shells, constructed with gussets.

Sec. 74853. Golf bag body flats.

Sec. 74854. Bathtub elbow rests.

Sec. 74855. Door swings.

Sec. 74856. Under bed restraints.

Sec. 74857. Flat golf bag body components, without bottoms.

Sec. 74858. Bath kneeler.

Sec. 74859. Pillow shells, with oval jacquard weave.

Sec. 74860. Two-piece camera mount kits.

Sec. 74861. Sleeve covers.

Sec. 74862. Sports footwear for men, valued over $20 per pair.

Sec. 74863. Sports footwear for women, valued over $20 per pair.

Sec. 74864. Men’s cycling shoes valued over $18 per pair.

Sec. 74865. Women’s cycling shoes valued over $16 per pair.

Sec. 74866. Men's golf shoes with outers and uppers of rubber or plastics, valued over $20 per pair.

Sec. 74867. Golf shoes other than for men, with outers and uppers of rubber or plastics, valued over $20 per pair.

Sec. 74868. Winter cycling boots for men.

Sec. 74869. Winter cycling boots for women.

Sec. 74870. Men's protective active footwear with waterproof soles, valued over $26 per pair, covering the ankle.

Sec. 74871. Women's protective active footwear with waterproof soles, valued over $27 per pair, 15.35–25.4 cm in height.

Sec. 74872. Children's protective active footwear with waterproof soles, valued over $18 per pair.

Sec. 74873. Men's protective active footwear with waterproof soles, valued over $27 per pair, 15.35–25.4 cm in height.

Sec. 74874. Children's footwear valued over $15 per pair.

Sec. 74875. Women's protective active footwear, valued over $25 per pair, 15.35–25.4 cm in height.

Sec. 74876. Women's rubber or plastic footwear covering the ankle with fox-like banding.

Sec. 74877. Cheer shoes covering the ankle.

Sec. 74878. Footwear for women, with 90 percent of the external surface of rubber or plastic, valued $15–$22 per pair.

Sec. 74879. Sideline cheer shoes.

Sec. 74880. Men's athletic footwear, valued under $9 per pair.

Sec. 74881. Athletic footwear for women, valued not over $9 per pair.

Sec. 74882. Athletic footwear for children, valued not over $8 per pair.

Sec. 74883. Men's golf shoes, with outer soles and uppers of rubber or plastics, not covering the ankle, valued $15 per pair or over.

Sec. 74884. Golf shoes other than for men, with outer soles and uppers of rubber or plastics, not covering the ankle, valued $15 per pair or over.

Sec. 74885. Men's rubber/plastic footwear, valued not over $5 per pair.

Sec. 74886. Women's rubber/plastic footwear, valued not over $6 per pair.

Sec. 74887. Children's athletic shoes with glitter uppers.

Sec. 74888. Cheer shoes with sole less than 12 mm.

Sec. 74889. Men's golf shoes with outers and uppers of rubber or plastics, valued over $19 per pair.

Sec. 74890. Golf shoes other than for men, outer soles and uppers of rubber or plastics, valued over $19 per pair.

Sec. 74891. Men's golf shoes, outer soles of rubber, plastics, leather or composition leather and uppers of leather (except pigskin uppers).

Sec. 74892. Men's oxford work footwear with metal safety toe and internal metatarsal protection.

Sec. 74893. Oxford-style leather footwear with metal safety toe and static dissipating protection.

Sec. 74894. Women’s leather footwear, lined with pigskin with zipper, valued $47–$60 per pair.

Sec. 74895. Women's leather footwear, lined with pigskin, valued $31–$40 per pair.

Sec. 74896. Women's slip-on cow/calf hair footwear, valued $50–$60 per pair.

Sec. 74897. Women’s leather footwear lined with sheepskin.

Sec. 74898. Women’s leather slip-on footwear lined with sheep leather.

Sec. 74899. Women's leather slip-on footwear lined with pigskin.

Sec. 74900. Women's leather footwear, lined with pigskin, valued $21–$27 per pair.

Sec. 74901. Men's mid-cut work footwear with composite safety toe and waterproof leather uppers.

Sec. 74902. Men's leather upper footwear, San Crispino construction, valued over $32 per pair.

Sec. 74903. Men's leather upper athletic footwear.

Sec. 74904. Women's footwear with leather uppers, lined with pigskin, valued $37–$43 per pair.

Sec. 74905. Women's footwear with leather uppers, lined with pigskin, valued $88–$102 per pair.

Sec. 74906. Women's footwear with leather uppers, lined with pigskin, valued $24–$32 per pair.

Sec. 74907. Women's footwear with leather uppers, lined with pigskin, valued $57–$62 per pair.

Sec. 74908. Women's footwear with leather uppers, strap with closed toe and open heel.

Sec. 74909. Open toe women's footwear, valued over $23 but not over $27 per pair.

Sec. 74910. Slip-on footwear for women, valued over $24 but not over $27 per pair.

Sec. 74911. Women's footwear with leather uppers, lined with pigskin, closed toe or heel with functional zippers on sides.

Sec. 74912. Women's footwear with leather uppers, lined with pigskin, closed toe or heel with zipper closure, height of 43–48 cm.

Sec. 74913. Women's footwear with leather uppers, lined with pigskin covering the knee.

Sec. 74914. Women's footwear with leather uppers, lined with pigskin, closed toe or heel with zipper closure, height of 48–52 cm.

Sec. 74915. Women's footwear with leather uppers, open toe with strap and buckle, valued $14–$25 per pair.

Sec. 74916. Women's slip-on footwear with bovine leather uppers.

Sec. 74917. Women's footwear with leather uppers, lined with pigskin with adjustable laces.

Sec. 74918. Men's waterproof leather footwear, valued $27 per pair or higher.

Sec. 74919. Men's or boys' golf shoes, valued $30 per pair or higher.

Sec. 74920. Competitive cheer shoes with leather uppers.

Sec. 74921. Children's waterproof leather footwear, not covering the ankle, valued $14 per pair or higher.

Sec. 74922. Women's footwear with leather uppers, open toe with strap and buckle, valued $12.50–$28 per pair.

Sec. 74923. Women's footwear with leather uppers, closed toe with strap and buckle.

Sec. 74924. Women's footwear with leather uppers, with strap and buckle, valued $27–$40 per pair.

Sec. 74925. Women's footwear with leather uppers, with strap and buckle, valued $12.70–$18.70 per pair.

Sec. 74926. Children's leather upper athletic footwear, valued not over $9 per pair.

Sec. 74927. Men's athletic type footwear with uppers of textile materials of vegetable fibers and outer soles of rubber or plastic with textile flocking.

Sec. 74928. Athletic footwear for men, with a bellows tongue, valued over $6.50 but not over $12 per pair.

Sec. 74929. Athletic footwear for women, with a bellows tongue, valued over $6.50 but not over $12 per pair.

Sec. 74930. Athletic footwear for children, bellows tongue, valued over $6.50 but not over $12 per pair.

Sec. 74931. Athletic footwear for men, valued over $6.50 but not over $9 per pair.

Sec. 74932. Athletic footwear for children, valued over $6.50 but not over $9 per pair.

Sec. 74933. Men's waterproof footwear, valued over $15 per pair, covering the ankle.

Sec. 74934. Men's waterproof footwear, valued over $13 per pair, not covering the ankle.

Sec. 74935. Women's waterproof footwear, valued over $15 per pair, covering the ankle.

Sec. 74936. Women's waterproof footwear, valued over $13 per pair, not covering the ankle.

Sec. 74937. Cheer shoes with uppers of textile materials.

Sec. 74938. Men's golf shoes, uppers of textile materials.

Sec. 74939. Golf shoes other than for men, uppers of textile materials.

Sec. 74940. Women's footwear with textile uppers and 50 percent or more of the surface area of which is leather.

Sec. 74941. Shoe and boot covers.

Sec. 74942. Women's footwear with textile uppers, open toes or heels, valued $15–$30 per pair.

Sec. 74943. Men's textile upper footwear, with open toes or open heels, valued not over $12 per pair.

Sec. 74944. Women's textile upper footwear, with open toes or open heels, valued not over $12 per pair.

Sec. 74945. Children's textile upper footwear, with open toes or open heels, valued not over $12 per pair.

Sec. 74946. Oxford footwear with textile upper and composite toe, valued at $12–$20 per pair.

Sec. 74947. Oxford-style footwear for men or women with textile uppers, with an alloy safety toecap and static dissipating protection.

Sec. 74948. Oxford-style work footwear with steel safety toe and static dissipating protection.

Sec. 74949. Women's footwear, covering the ankle but not the knee, valued over $24 per pair.

Sec. 74950. Men's textile upper footwear, not covering the ankle, valued over $24 per pair.

Sec. 74951. Oxford footwear with textile uppers and composite toe, valued over $20 per pair.

Sec. 74952. Men's mid-cut footwear with a textile upper and a protective toe cap.

Sec. 74953. Women's footwear with leather soles and textile uppers, open toes or heels, valued $12–$24 per pair.

Sec. 74954. Footwear for women valued over $20 but not over $24 per pair.

Sec. 74955. Women's footwear with leather soles and textile uppers, valued $15–$20 per pair.

Sec. 74956. Women's footwear with leather soles and textile uppers, valued $20–$25 per pair.

Sec. 74957. Women's footwear with cork soles and textile uppers.

Sec. 74958. Men's footwear with felt soles, not covering the ankle, valued $20 per pair or higher.

Sec. 74959. Women's and girls' footwear with cork uppers, valued less than $25 per pair.

Sec. 74960. Women's footwear with cow/calf hair uppers, valued $35–$40 per pair, covering the ankle.

Sec. 74961. Women's footwear with cow/calf hair uppers, valued $35–$40 per pair, not covering the ankle.

Sec. 74962. Women's footwear with cow/calf hair uppers, valued $19–$25 per pair.

Sec. 74963. Women's footwear with cow/calf hair uppers, valued $50–$55 per pair.

Sec. 74964. Women's footwear, leather soles and rubber/plastic uppers, valued $16–$18 per pair.

Sec. 74965. Women's footwear with cow/calf hair uppers, valued $19–$34 per pair.

Sec. 74966. Footwear for women, valued over $50 but not over $60 per pair.

Sec. 74967. Calf hair upper footwear.

Sec. 74968. Gaiters of man-made fibers.

Sec. 74969. Hats of vegetable fibers.

Sec. 74970. Hairnets.

Sec. 74971. Cotton knit hats, valued $8 or less.

Sec. 74972. Babies' woven cotton hats.

Sec. 74973. Hats of man-made fiber, valued $5–$25.

Sec. 74974. Waterproof and insulated hats with ear flaps, valued over $15.

Sec. 74975. Fishing wading staffs.

Sec. 74976. Plastic plants for aquariums, not glued or bound.

Sec. 74977. Natural stone ledger tile of sandstone.

Sec. 74978. Marble mosaic and pebble tiles.

Sec. 74979. Natural stone limestone tiles.

Sec. 74980. Natural stone marble tiles.

Sec. 74981. Waterjet natural stone mosaic tile.

Sec. 74982. Marble entertaining and serveware.

Sec. 74983. Articles of marble for kitchen and dining room.

Sec. 74984. Natural stone ledger tiles of travertine.

Sec. 74985. Travertine decorative tile.

Sec. 74986. Limestone decorative tiles.

Sec. 74987. Blank, embossed, and printed stoneware coaster disks and trivets.

Sec. 74988. Rolled green glass sheets.

Sec. 74989. Framed rear-view mirrors.

Sec. 74990. Wall mirrors, unframed.

Sec. 74991. Wall mirrors, framed.

Sec. 74992. Stemware (crystalline) drinking glasses valued over $0.30 but not over $3 each, other than those presented in sets.

Sec. 74993. Double-walled insulated glass tumblers.

Sec. 74994. Diamond-shaped stemmed wine glasses.

Sec. 74995. Twisted-center stemless wine glass.

Sec. 74996. Crystalline drinking glasses, without stems, not in sets.

Sec. 74997. Double-walled insulated glass bowls.

Sec. 74998. Leaf-shaped glass decanters.

Sec. 74999. Set of four appetizer plates made of glass with steel caddy holder, valued at $2 each.

Sec. 75000. Spice rack with glass jars and wooden lids valued not over $3 each.

Sec. 75001. Glass lens blanks for infrared applications.

Sec. 75002. Hair accessories of glass beads, imitation pearls, and imitation stones, valued less than $7.

Sec. 75003. Filter bags with acid-resistant coating, of woven fiberglass laminated to ePTFE, weighing at least 325 g/m2 but not over 350 g/m2.

Sec. 75004. Fiberglass replacement wicks for outdoor garden torch.

Sec. 75005. Filter bags of woven fiberglass fabric laminated to an ePTFE, with a polytetrafluoroethylene coated backing, not acid resistant, weighing at least 721 g/m2 but not over 771 g/m2.

Sec. 75006. Silver catalyst.

Sec. 75007. Silver round blanks.

Sec. 75008. Ferroboron alloy.

Sec. 75009. Cast iron nonmalleable threaded main body combo castings for residential fuel oil tanks.

Sec. 75010. Cast iron nonmalleable threaded vent caps for residential fuel oil tanks.

Sec. 75011. Cast iron nonmalleable threaded bushings for residential fuel oil tanks.

Sec. 75012. Cast iron nonmalleable threaded tank adapters for residential fuel oil tanks.

Sec. 75013. Cast iron nonmalleable threaded fill alarm main body for residential fuel oil tanks.

Sec. 75014. Cast iron nonmalleable threaded fill box caps for residential fuel oil tanks.

Sec. 75015. Cast iron nonmalleable threaded leg flanges for residential fuel oil tanks.

Sec. 75016. Portable gas cooking stoves.

Sec. 75017. Portable outdoor cookers.

Sec. 75018. Self-anchored beverage containers.

Sec. 75019. Stainless steel handmade kitchen sinks.

Sec. 75020. Loose frame baskets.

Sec. 75021. Two-story fire escape ladders.

Sec. 75022. Three-story fire escape ladders.

Sec. 75023. Work support stands of steel.

Sec. 75024. Locking fixtures of iron or steel.

Sec. 75025. Stainless steel phone handle-and-stand accessories.

Sec. 75026. Circular and S-shaped stainless steel carabiners.

Sec. 75027. Pieces of refined unwrought copper cathode 99.9999 percent pure.

Sec. 75028. Ultra-thin and wide-width aluminum foil.

Sec. 75029. Etched capacitor aluminum foil of a thickness 0.018–0.126 mm.

Sec. 75030. Stove top coffee makers.

Sec. 75031. Aluminum shower caddies.

Sec. 75032. Step stools of aluminum.

Sec. 75033. Aluminum ladders.

Sec. 75034. Circular and S-shaped aluminum carabiners.

Sec. 75035. Stationary sprinklers of zinc.

Sec. 75036. Tungsten waste and scrap.

Sec. 75037. Cobalt alloys.

Sec. 75038. Certain gallium (Ga).

Sec. 75039. Niobium (columbium) rings no thicker than 20 mm.

Sec. 75040. Tungsten secondary raw material.

Sec. 75041. Gear-driven bolt cutters and pipe cutters.

Sec. 75042. Rotary cutters.

Sec. 75043. Food graters.

Sec. 75044. Hand tools for applying plastic clip fasteners to garments.

Sec. 75045. Steel workstations with vises adjustable by foot pedal.

Sec. 75046. Fixed carbide cutter and roller cone drill bits.

Sec. 75047. Rotary food graters.

Sec. 75048. Coffee presses.

Sec. 75049. Vacuum insulated coffee servers with a brew-through lid.

Sec. 75050. Vacuum insulated coffee servers with no lid.

Sec. 75051. Vacuum insulated coffee servers with fitted hinged lid.

Sec. 75052. Commercial vacuum insulated coffee servers with sight gauge.

Sec. 75053. Commercial vacuum insulated coffee servers with plastic base.

Sec. 75054. Commercial vacuum insulated coffee servers with plastic base and stand.

Sec. 75055. Craft knives with fixed pen-like or retractable blades.

Sec. 75056. Craft knives.

Sec. 75057. Blades for craft knives with non-fixed blades.

Sec. 75058. Ergonomic pinking shears.

Sec. 75059. Spring-action scissors.

Sec. 75060. Electronic locks for lockers.

Sec. 75061. Luggage locks of base metal, packaged for retail sale.

Sec. 75062. Key-operated door handles, push-pull-rotate.

Sec. 75063. Vent mounted magnetic mobile phone holder for automobiles.

Sec. 75064. Dash mounted magnetic mobile phone holder for automobiles.

Sec. 75065. Windshield mounted magnetic mobile phone holder for automobiles.

Sec. 75066. Steel latches with plastic plungers.

Sec. 75067. Non-key-operated door handles.

Sec. 75068. Curtain rings.

Sec. 75069. Brackets.

Sec. 75070. Curtain rods.

Sec. 75071. Curtain rod hardware.

Sec. 75072. Curtain tiebacks.

Sec. 75073. Curtain rod finials.

Sec. 75074. Curved shower rods.

Sec. 75075. Shower hooks and rings.

Sec. 75076. Straight shower rods.

Sec. 75077. Steel window rods.

Sec. 75078. Antitheft steel cases with digital locks.

Sec. 75079. Stainless steel hose kits.

Sec. 75080. Stainless steel hoses.

Sec. 75081. Wrist watch strap buckles not over 18 mm.

Sec. 75082. Wrist watch strap buckles over 18 mm.

Sec. 75083. Used cylinder heads.

Sec. 75084. Cylinder heads used solely or principally with certain engines.

Sec. 75085. Engine blocks.

Sec. 75086. Swirler assemblies for turbines.

Sec. 75087. Barrels for fuel mixing.

Sec. 75088. Injector assemblies for certain turbines.

Sec. 75089. Stem assemblies for certain turbines.

Sec. 75090. Tip assemblies for non-gas turbines.

Sec. 75091. High pressure fuel pumps.

Sec. 75092. Dry scroll vacuum pumps 364x333x485 mm.

Sec. 75093. Dry scroll vacuum pumps 297x260x420 mm.

Sec. 75094. Dry scroll vacuum pumps 254x260x420 mm.

Sec. 75095. Dry scroll vacuum pumps 181x140x358 mm.

Sec. 75096. Turbomolecular vacuum pumps.

Sec. 75097. Rotary vane vacuum pumps valued over $500 each.

Sec. 75098. Vacuum diffusion pumps valued over $900 each.

Sec. 75099. Hand- or foot-operated air pumps.

Sec. 75100. Roof vent fans.

Sec. 75101. 12-Amp corded electric leaf blowers.

Sec. 75102. Cordless battery powered leaf blowers not exceeding 20 volts.

Sec. 75103. Cordless battery powered leaf blowers between 20 and 60 V.

Sec. 75104. Fan assemblies for cab climate systems.

Sec. 75105. Aquarium air pumps.

Sec. 75106. Heat pumps for residential use.

Sec. 75107. Heat pumps (outdoor units) for split air conditioner systems.

Sec. 75108. High-wall indoor units.

Sec. 75109. Single-zone outdoor units.

Sec. 75110. Mini heat pumps for split air conditioner systems.

Sec. 75111. Multi-zone outdoor unit ductless systems.

Sec. 75112. Indoor units of split air conditioner systems.

Sec. 75113. Ductless 18000 BTU heat pumps, single zone inverter.

Sec. 75114. Single-phase heat pump.

Sec. 75115. Steel vacuum pitchers with plastic hinged lid.

Sec. 75116. Oil filters.

Sec. 75117. Battery powered nasal irrigators.

Sec. 75118. Struts to absorb vibration.

Sec. 75119. Table saws (25.4 cm.), operable corded and cordless.

Sec. 75120. Sliding miter saws (25.4 cm) with laser, corded and cordless.

Sec. 75121. Electromechanical rotary hammers, corded and cordless.

Sec. 75122. Electromechanical hammer impact drivers, corded and cordless.

Sec. 75123. Rotary hammer drill tools with self-contained electric motor.

Sec. 75124. Drill driver tools with self-contained electric motor.

Sec. 75125. Extruders.

Sec. 75126. Three-dimensional drawing pens.

Sec. 75127. Professional grade three-dimensional drawing pens.

Sec. 75128. Electric multi-functional blower vacuums.

Sec. 75129. Autosamplers (multisamplers) for liquid chromatographs.

Sec. 75130. Autosamplers (vialsamplers) for liquid chromatographs.

Sec. 75131. Hydraulic hammer assembly.

Sec. 75132. Segmented bladder-operated molds, with more than 25-inch rim diameter.

Sec. 75133. Used valves for directional control.

Sec. 75134. Keg spears with pressure release valves.

Sec. 75135. Multiport distribution controllers.

Sec. 75136. Subsea modular trees.

Sec. 75137. Flow selector unit-multi-port 6-branch engine crankshafts.

Sec. 75138. Engine crankshafts.

Sec. 75139. Turbocharger journal bearings.

Sec. 75140. Mid-range bearing housings.

Sec. 75141. Heavy duty bearing housings.

Sec. 75142. Fixed ration gear boxes.

Sec. 75143. Track drive gear boxes.

Sec. 75144. Swing bearing assembly.

Sec. 75145. Gears for use in machinery or within engines.

Sec. 75146. 14Y stepper motors.

Sec. 75147. Air door actuators.

Sec. 75148. Servo motors.

Sec. 75149. DC brushed rhombic winding NdFeb magnet motors, with output under 18.65 W.

Sec. 75150. DC brushed rhombic winding NdFeB magnet motors.

Sec. 75151. DC brushed rhombic winding AlNiCo magnet motors, with output under 18.65 W.

Sec. 75152. DC brushless rhombic winding NdFeB magnet motors, with output under 18.65 W.

Sec. 75153. DC brushed rhombic winding NdFeB magnet motors, with output over 18.65 but not over 37.5 W.

Sec. 75154. DC brushed rhombic winding AlNiCo magnet motors, with output over 18.65 W but not over 37.5 W.

Sec. 75155. DC brushless slotless rhombic winding NdFeB magnet motors output over 18.65 W but not over 37.5 W.

Sec. 75156. DC brushed rhombic winding NdFeB magnet motors output over 37.5 W but not over 74.6 W.

Sec. 75157. DC brushless slotless rhombic winding NdFeB magnet motors output over 37.5 W but not over 74.6 W.

Sec. 75158. Motors.

Sec. 75159. DC motors of an output exceeding 74.6 W but not exceeding 735 W.

Sec. 75160. DC motors, of an output exceeding 74.6 W but not exceeding 735 W.

Sec. 75161. DC brushed rhombic winding NdFeB magnet motors output over 74.6 W but not over 735 W.

Sec. 75162. DC brushless slotless rhombic winding NdFeB magnet motors output over 74.6 W but not over 735 W.

Sec. 75163. DC motors of an output exceeding 750 W but not exceeding 14.92 kW.

Sec. 75164. DC electric motor for non-aircraft gas turbines.

Sec. 75165. AC alternators.

Sec. 75166. AC alternators with copper windings.

Sec. 75167. Wound stators and rotor assemblies.

Sec. 75168. Rotors.

Sec. 75169. Stators for washing machines, with a 27-tooth design.

Sec. 75170. Stators for washing machines, with an 18-tooth design.

Sec. 75171. Rotors for washing machines, with a height of 60.8 mm.

Sec. 75172. Rotors for washing machines, with a height of 49 mm.

Sec. 75173. 6 V lead-acid storage batteries.

Sec. 75174. 12 V lead-acid storage batteries, used for the auxiliary source of power.

Sec. 75175. Lead-acid storage batteries, used for wheelchairs.

Sec. 75176. 12 V lead-acid storage batteries, rated at less than 15 ampere-hours.

Sec. 75177. 12 V lead-acid storage batteries, rated at 15 ampere-hours or more.

Sec. 75178. Cell box assemblies, weighing 15 kg or more but not over 18 kg.

Sec. 75179. Cell box assemblies, weighing 30 kg or more but not over 36 kg.

Sec. 75180. Cell box assemblies, weighing 36 kg or more but not over 49 kg.

Sec. 75181. Cell box assemblies NX.

Sec. 75182. Food processors with a capacity greater than 2.9 liters but not exceeding 3.1 liters.

Sec. 75183. Food processors with a capacity greater than 1.6 liters but not exceeding 2.2 liters.

Sec. 75184. Cordless hand blenders.

Sec. 75185. Cordless hand mixers.

Sec. 75186. Corded hand blenders.

Sec. 75187. Burr coffee grinders.

Sec. 75188. Electric food processors with bowl scraper.

Sec. 75189. Electric food processors with snap-locking lid.

Sec. 75190. Electric juice extractors.

Sec. 75191. Electric drink mixers.

Sec. 75192. Spiralizing food processors with a capacity equal to or greater than 2.36 liters but not exceeding 2.64 liters.

Sec. 75193. Spiralizing food processors with a capacity equal to or greater than 2.83 liters but not exceeding 3.07 liters.

Sec. 75194. Dicing food processors.

Sec. 75195. Compact food processor with smoothie function.

Sec. 75196. Juice extractors.

Sec. 75197. Integrated baby food making systems.

Sec. 75198. Electric juice mixers and grinders.

Sec. 75199. Ultrasonic humidifiers.

Sec. 75200. Automatic litterboxes, valued no more than $100.

Sec. 75201. Electric toothbrushes.

Sec. 75202. Ultrasonic cool/warm mist humidifiers with aromatherapy.

Sec. 75203. 2-in-1 can opener.

Sec. 75204. Food spiralizing devices.

Sec. 75205. Ceramic bowls.

Sec. 75206. Food grinders for certain electromechanical stand food mixers.

Sec. 75207. Pasta press extruders for certain stand food mixers.

Sec. 75208. Stainless steel bowls for certain electromechanical stand food mixers, with capacity greater than 4.2 liters but not exceeding 4.8 liters.

Sec. 75209. Stainless steel bowls for certain electromechanical stand food mixers, with capacity greater than 2.8 liters but not exceeding 3.4 liters.

Sec. 75210. Stainless steel bowls for certain electromechanical stand food mixers, with capacity greater than 5.6 liters but not exceeding 8.6 liters.

Sec. 75211. Pasta rollers and cutters for stand food mixers.

Sec. 75212. Glass bowls for certain electromechanical stand food mixers.

Sec. 75213. Body trimmers for detailed hair trimming.

Sec. 75214. Hair clipper sets.

Sec. 75215. Rechargeable trimmers for trimming human hair.

Sec. 75216. PCB assemblies for clippers and trimmers.

Sec. 75217. LED bicycle wheel spoke lights.

Sec. 75218. Bicycle rear lights.

Sec. 75219. Portable electric lamps.

Sec. 75220. Space heaters.

Sec. 75221. Microwave ovens with capacity not exceeding 22.5 liters.

Sec. 75222. Microwave ovens with capacity exceeding 22.5 liters but not exceeding 31 liters.

Sec. 75223. Low-profile microwave ovens with electronic opening mechanism and integral range hood.

Sec. 75224. Low-profile microwave ovens with push button opening mechanism and integral range hood.

Sec. 75225. Low-profile microwave ovens with electronic opening mechanism and without a range hood.

Sec. 75226. Searing grills.

Sec. 75227. Automatic drip coffee makers.

Sec. 75228. Espresso machines.

Sec. 75229. Coffee makers with dishwasher safe removable parts.

Sec. 75230. Single-service coffee makers with milk frothers.

Sec. 75231. Electric coffee makers with dual dispensers.

Sec. 75232. Electric coffee makers for brewing capsules.

Sec. 75233. Automatic or manual pour over coffee makers.

Sec. 75234. Removable reservoir coffeemakers.

Sec. 75235. Single serve coffee makers.

Sec. 75236. 2-way coffee makers with a 12-cup carafe and a pod brewer.

Sec. 75237. Rapid cold brew and hot coffee makers.

Sec. 75238. Electric kettles.

Sec. 75239. Electric toasters with even-toast feature.

Sec. 75240. Electric toasters with 6.5 inch slots.

Sec. 75241. Electric toasters with 37 mm wide slots, with an under-base cord wrap.

Sec. 75242. 2- and 4- slot toasters, not having a button to keep toaster contents warm after toasting.

Sec. 75243. 2-slot toasters, with a button to keep toaster content warm after toasting.

Sec. 75244. Electric toasters with double-slice slots.

Sec. 75245. Electric toasters with 37 mm wide slots, with a retractable cord.

Sec. 75246. Electric pressure cookers rated more than 800 W but not more than 1,000 W, with a capacity of not less than 5 liters.

Sec. 75247. Electric pressure cookers rated more than 1,200 W but not more than 1,400 W, with a capacity of less than 5 liters.

Sec. 75248. Electric pressure cookers rated more than 1,000 W but not more than 1,200 W, with a capacity of less than 5 liters.

Sec. 75249. Contoured heating pads.

Sec. 75250. Slow cookers with non-stick ceramic coated stoneware.

Sec. 75251. Heating pads.

Sec. 75252. Programmable slow cookers with digital display.

Sec. 75253. 8-Quart electric slow cookers.

Sec. 75254. Programmable slow cookers.

Sec. 75255. Electric slow cookers with locking lid.

Sec. 75256. Double flip waffle makers with removable grids.

Sec. 75257. Ice cream waffle cone and bowl makers.

Sec. 75258. Electric breakfast sandwich makers.

Sec. 75259. Pressure cookers.

Sec. 75260. 10-quart programmable slow cookers.

Sec. 75261. Polished stainless steel 1.5-quart tea kettles.

Sec. 75262. Egg bite makers.

Sec. 75263. Vacuum steel insulated coffee carafes, of a kind used with deep ultraviolet lithography machines.

Sec. 75264. Vacuum steel insulated carafes for household coffee machines, of a kind used with deep ultraviolet lithography machines.

Sec. 75265. Vacuum steel bodies with inner and outer steel layers.

Sec. 75266. Lamp-holder housings of plastic.

Sec. 75267. 660 W, 125 V, lamp-holder with two 15 amp outlets.

Sec. 75268. Combination duplex receptacle/outlet and USB charger, 15–20 amp, 125 V.

Sec. 75269. Range and dryer receptacles.

Sec. 75270. Residential grade receptacles.

Sec. 75271. Residential and commercial USB receptacles.

Sec. 75272. Power strips.

Sec. 75273. Surge protectors.

Sec. 75274. Programmable controllers for architectural lighting.

Sec. 75275. Electronic modular control panels for generators.

Sec. 75276. Power distribution modules and programmable controllers.

Sec. 75277. Glass capacitive touchscreen assemblies with LCD.

Sec. 75278. Lamps containing deuterium gas without radio-frequency identification (RFID).

Sec. 75279. Lamps containing deuterium gas with radio-frequency identification (RFID).

Sec. 75280. Fiber channel coaxial cables of silver-plated copper conductors and expanded ePTFE dielectrics.

Sec. 75281. Insulated coaxial cables, of a kind used with deep ultraviolet lithography machines.

Sec. 75282. Coaxial cables insulated with ePTFE, vapor sealed, of a kind used with deep ultraviolet lithography machines.

Sec. 75283. Coaxial cables insulated with ePTFE, non-vapor sealed, of a kind used with deep ultraviolet lithography machines.

Sec. 75284. Low speed automotive ethernet USB harnesses.

Sec. 75285. High speed autolink cable USB harnesses.

Sec. 75286. Insulated electric conductors, of a kind used with extreme ultraviolet lithography machines.

Sec. 75287. Insulated electric conductors, of a kind used with deep ultraviolet lithography machines.

Sec. 75288. Insulated electric conductors, of a kind used with optical instruments.

Sec. 75289. Rings, blocks, and other insulating fittings of quartz.

Sec. 75290. Front tire splash guards for vehicles.

Sec. 75291. Rear tire splash guards for vehicles.

Sec. 75292. Automatic gear boxes.

Sec. 75293. Suspension systems (struts) for off-highway trucks.

Sec. 75294. Suspension system stabilizer bars.

Sec. 75295. Tie rod assemblies.

Sec. 75296. Used axle housings.

Sec. 75297. Used parts for power trains.

Sec. 75298. Front windshield covers.

Sec. 75299. Expansion chambers.

Sec. 75300. Bicycle racks for car roofs.

Sec. 75301. High pressure fuel injector rails.

Sec. 75302. Stand-up bicycles, having both wheels exceeding 63.5 cm in diameter.

Sec. 75303. Elliptical cycles, with wheels not exceeding 63.5 cm in diameter.

Sec. 75304. Bicycle frames, other than of steel, valued $600 or less.

Sec. 75305. Internal gear bicycle hubs, other than two or three speeds.

Sec. 75306. Bicycle pedals other than clipless pedals.

Sec. 75307. Clipless bicycle pedals and parts thereof.

Sec. 75308. Carbon fiber bicycle seatposts.

Sec. 75309. Bicycle handlebar tape, other than silicon or leather tape.

Sec. 75310. Trailer cycles.

Sec. 75311. Dropper seatposts.

Sec. 75312. Bicycle fenders.

Sec. 75313. Bicycle handlebars.

Sec. 75314. Multi-functional steel carts.

Sec. 75315. Non-mechanically propelled industrial hand truck.

Sec. 75316. Moving dollies.

Sec. 75317. Paragliders, paraglider wings and paraglider harnesses.

Sec. 75318. Sailing catamarans and power catamarans.

Sec. 75319. Projection lenses.

Sec. 75320. Mounted optical lenses.

Sec. 75321. Objective lenses for broadcast cameras.

Sec. 75322. Objective lenses for cinema cameras.

Sec. 75323. Magnifying spectacles.

Sec. 75324. LCD television panel assemblies, with a video display measuring over 175.26 cm.

Sec. 75325. LCD television panel assemblies, with a video display measuring over 149.86 cm but not over 175.26 cm.

Sec. 75326. LCD television panel assemblies, with a video display measuring over 139.7 cm but not over 149.86 cm.

Sec. 75327. LCD television panel assemblies, with a video display measuring over 137.16 cm but not over 139.7 cm.

Sec. 75328. Housings designed for infrared lenses.

Sec. 75329. Electronic temperature indicators, weighing 14.2 g.

Sec. 75330. Electronic temperature indicators, weighing 64.4 g.

Sec. 75331. Electronic temperature indicators, weighing 430 g.

Sec. 75332. Global cargo trackers, weighing 660 g.

Sec. 75333. Temperature data monitors, weighing 115 g.

Sec. 75334. Temperature data monitors, weighing 138.9 g.

Sec. 75335. Temperature data monitors, weighing 133.2 g.

Sec. 75336. Parts and accessories of bicycle speedometers.

Sec. 75337. Wired remote controllers.

Sec. 75338. Analog/digital wrist watches.

Sec. 75339. Mechanical wrist watches.

Sec. 75340. Mechanical wrist watches with leather or other band.

Sec. 75341. Analog pocket watches.

Sec. 75342. Projection alarm clocks, non-atomic.

Sec. 75343. Projection atomic alarm clocks.

Sec. 75344. Analog wall clocks without thermometer, hygrometer, or barometer gauges.

Sec. 75345. Analog clocks with thermometer and hygrometer.

Sec. 75346. Atomic analog wall clocks.

Sec. 75347. Atomic digital clocks.

Sec. 75348. Analog kitchen timers.

Sec. 75349. Wrist watch movements having over one jewel and less than 7 jewels.

Sec. 75350. Watch movements having over 7 jewels and under 17 jewels.

Sec. 75351. Watch cases or bodies over 41 mm in diameter.

Sec. 75352. Watch cases or bodies not over 41 mm in diameter.

Sec. 75353. Watch case bezels, backs, and centers.

Sec. 75354. Watch case parts.

Sec. 75355. Stainless steel watch bracelets.

Sec. 75356. Watch dials.

Sec. 75357. Watch crowns.

Sec. 75358. Watch hands.

Sec. 75359. Acoustic guitars.

Sec. 75360. Console digital pianos.

Sec. 75361. Grand digital pianos.

Sec. 75362. Electronic 61-key keyboards.

Sec. 75363. Electric guitars and acoustic/electric guitars.

Sec. 75364. Memory foam travel pillows.

Sec. 75365. Lighting for wall installation.

Sec. 75366. Decorative bathroom fan assemblies (lighting fixtures) assemblies.

Sec. 75367. Metal household floor lamps.

Sec. 75368. Solar powered pathway lights, each measuring between 36.8 cm and 42 cm in height.

Sec. 75369. Solar powered pathway lights, each measuring between 45 cm and 48 cm in height.

Sec. 75370. Exterior exit viewing lights, dual beam.

Sec. 75371. LED flameless candles.

Sec. 75372. Aquarium LED light strands.

Sec. 75373. LED light modules for bathroom fans/lights.

Sec. 75374. Aquarium LED light sticks.

Sec. 75375. Aquarium LED light strips.

Sec. 75376. Decorative votive candle holders.

Sec. 75377. Candle jar shades.

Sec. 75378. Non-electrical lighting.

Sec. 75379. Outdoor garden or patio torches of bamboo construction.

Sec. 75380. Outdoor garden or patio torches of non-bamboo construction.

Sec. 75381. Indoor oil lamps with base of glass or metal.

Sec. 75382. Outdoor garden torches for tabletop use.

Sec. 75383. Glass lens arrays for spotlights.

Sec. 75384. Lamp shades.

Sec. 75385. Galvanized steel LED downlight housing frames.

Sec. 75386. Aluminum cylinders for LED lighting fixtures.

Sec. 75387. Galvanized steel brackets and plates for LED lighting fixtures.

Sec. 75388. Aluminum LED downlight reflectors.

Sec. 75389. Outdoor garden torch replacement canisters.

Sec. 75390. Iris subassemblies for moving lights.

Sec. 75391. Zoom modules for automated moving lights.

Sec. 75392. Golf club heads for fairway woods.

Sec. 75393. Golf club shafts for putters.

Sec. 75394. Steel golf club shafts, other than for putters.

Sec. 75395. Golf club shaft assemblies.

Sec. 75396. Graphite driver golf club shafts, extra stiff flex.

Sec. 75397. Graphite hybrid golf club shafts, extra stiff flex.

Sec. 75398. Graphite irons golf club shafts, extra stiff flex.

Sec. 75399. Graphite driver golf club shafts, regular, senior, adult, or ladies flex.

Sec. 75400. Graphite golf club driver shafts, stiff flex.

Sec. 75401. Graphite hybrid golf club shafts, regular, senior, adult, or ladies flex.

Sec. 75402. Graphite hybrid golf club shafts, stiff flex.

Sec. 75403. Graphite irons golf club shafts, regular, senior, adult, or ladies flex.

Sec. 75404. Graphite irons golf club shafts, stiff flex.

Sec. 75405. Pickleball paddles.

Sec. 75406. Pickleballs.

Sec. 75407. Exercise cycles.

Sec. 75408. Stationary trainers.

Sec. 75409. Multimodality fitness equipment, without integrated contact grip heart rate monitor.

Sec. 75410. Multimodality fitness equipment with integrated power sensor to measure the user's upper body power input.

Sec. 75411. Parts and accessories for treadmills.

Sec. 75412. Parts and accessories for ellipticals.

Sec. 75413. Parts and accessories for stationary exercise cycles.

Sec. 75414. Parts and accessories for weight training equipment.

Sec. 75415. Parts and accessories for certain exercise equipment machines.

Sec. 75416. Lateral elliptical machines.

Sec. 75417. Adjustable-weight kettlebells.

Sec. 75418. Adjustable-weight barbell.

Sec. 75419. Exercise cycles with dual-position handgrips.

Sec. 75420. Exercise cycles with single handgrips.

Sec. 75421. Upright exercise cycles.

Sec. 75422. Recumbent exercise cycles with touchscreen consoles.

Sec. 75423. Leaning exercise cycles.

Sec. 75424. Rod gyms, with vertical bench.

Sec. 75425. Rod and resistance gyms, with flat benches.

Sec. 75426. Foldable treadmills, with LCD consoles with control keypads.

Sec. 75427. Foldable treadmills, with touchscreen consoles measuring 44.5 cm or less.

Sec. 75428. Indoor cycling machines with wireless data touchscreen displays.

Sec. 75429. Indoor cycling machines with LCD consoles and two water bottle holders.

Sec. 75430. Indoor cycling machines with LCD consoles and single water bottle holder.

Sec. 75431. Recumbent elliptical machines.

Sec. 75432. Fitness equipment combining the functions of an elliptical and a stair stepper, weight over 90 kgs.

Sec. 75433. Foldable treadmills with touchscreen console greater than 44.4 cm.

Sec. 75434. Interactive indoor cycling exercise cycles.

Sec. 75435. Multimodality fitness equipment, with integrated contact grip heart rate monitors.

Sec. 75436. Fishing reels valued not over $2.70 each, pre-spooled, with rod and fishing line.

Sec. 75437. Fishing reels valued not over $2.70 each.

Sec. 75438. Hard artificial crankbaits.

Sec. 75439. Collapsible big game decoys.

Sec. 75440. Vacuum steel hinged lid pitchers, not exceeding 1 liter.

Sec. 75441. Vacuum insulated drinkware having a capacity exceeding 1 liter but not exceeding 2 liters.

Sec. 75442. Vacuum insulated drinkware having a capacity exceeding 2 liters but not exceeding 4 liters.

Sec. 75443. Vacuum glass lined steel coffee servers over 2 liters.

Sec. 75444. Vacuum glass lined steel coffee servers over 2 liters with lever dispensing.

PART II—Existing duty suspensions and reductions

Sec. 75451. Extension of certain existing duty suspensions and reductions and other modifications.

PART III—Effective date

Sec. 75461. Effective date.

Subtitle C—Reauthorization of American Manufacturing Competitiveness Act of 2016

Sec. 75471. Reauthorization of American Manufacturing Competitiveness Act of 2016.

TITLE V—Authorization of Appropriations

Sec. 76001. Authorization of additional appropriations.

TITLE VI—Customs user fees

Sec. 77001. Extension of customs user fees.

A

CHIPS and O-RAN 5G Emergency appropriations

1001.

Table of contents

The table of contents for this division is as follows:

DIVISION A—CHIPS and O-RAN 5G Emergency appropriations

Sec. 1001. Table of contents.

Sec. 1002. Creating Helpful Incentives to Produce Semiconductors (CHIPS) for America Fund.

Sec. 1003. Appropriations for wireless supply chain innovation.

1002.

Creating Helpful Incentives to Produce Semiconductors (CHIPS) for America Fund

(a)

CHIPS for America Fund

(1)

Establishment

There is established in the Treasury of the United States a fund to be known as the Creating Helpful Incentives to Produce Semiconductors (CHIPS) for America Fund (referred to in this subsection as the Fund) for the Secretary of Commerce to carry out sections 9902 and 9906 of the William M. (Mac) Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021 (Public Law 116–283). Amounts in the Fund to carry out section 9906 of Public Law 116–283 shall be transferred to and merged with ac counts within the Department of Commerce to be used for such purposes.

(2)

Appropriation

(A)

In addition to amounts otherwise available for such purposes, there is appropriated to the Fund established in subsection (a)(1), out of amounts in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated—

(i)

for fiscal year 2022, $24,000,000,000, to remain available until expended, of which $19,000,000,000 shall be for section 9902 of Public Law 116–283, $2,000,000,000 shall be for subsection (c) of section 9906 of Public Law 116–283, $2,500,000,000 shall be for subsection (d) of section 9906 of Public Law 116–283, and $500,000,000 shall be for subsections (e) and (f) of section 9906 of Public Law 116–283;

(ii)

for fiscal year 2023, $7,000,000,000 to remain available until expended, of which $5,000,000,000 shall be for section 9902 of Public Law 116–283 and $2,000,000,000 shall be for subsections (c), (d), (e), and (f) of section 9906 of Public Law 116–283;

(iii)

for fiscal year 2024, $6,300,000,000, to remain available until expended, of which $5,000,000,000 shall be for section 9902 of Public Law 116–283 and $1,300,000,000 shall be for subsections (c), (d), (e), and (f) of section 9906 of Public Law 116–283;

(iv)

for fiscal year 2025, $6,100,000,000, to remain available until expended, of which $5,000,000,000 shall be for section 9902 of Public Law 116–283 and $1,100,000,000 shall be for subsections (c), (d), (e), and (f) of section 9906 of Public Law 116–283; and

(v)

for fiscal year 2026, $6,800,000,000, to remain available until expended, of which $5,000,000,000 shall be for section 9902 of Public Law 116– 283 and $1,800,000,000 shall be for subsections (c), (d), (e), and (f) of section 9906 of Public Law 116–283.

(B)

In carrying out this subsection, the Secretary of Commerce may use up to 2 percent of the amounts made available in each fiscal year for salaries and expenses, administration, and oversight purposes, of which $5,000,000 in each of fiscal years 2022 through 2026 shall be transferred to the Office of Inspector General of the Department of Commerce to oversee expenditures from the Fund.

(3)

Assistance for mature technology nodes

(A)

Of the amount available in fiscal year 2022 to implement section 9902 of Public Law 116–283, $2,000,000,000 shall be to provide Federal financial assistance to covered entities to incentivize investment in facilities and equipment in the United States for the fabrication, assembly, testing, or advanced packaging of semiconductors at mature technology nodes.

(B)

In addition to the procedures, eligibility, and considerations for review specified in subsection 9902(a)(2) of Public Law 116–283, in order to for an entity to qualify to receive Federal financial assistance under this paragraph, the covered entity shall—

(i)
(I)

provide equipment or materials for the fabrication, assembly, testing, or advanced packaging of semiconductors at mature technology nodes in the United States; or

(II)

fabricate, assemble using advanced packaging, or test semiconductors at mature technology nodes in the United States; and

(ii)

commit to using any Federal financial assistance received under this section to increase the production of semiconductors at mature technology nodes.

(C)

ln addition to the considerations described in subsection 9902(a)(2)(C) of Public Law 116–283, in granting Federal financial assistance under this paragraph, the Secretary may consider whether a covered entity produces or supplies equipment or materials used in the fabrication, assembly, testing, or advanced packaging of semiconductors at mature technology nodes that are necessary to support a critical manufacturing industry.

(D)

ln awarding Federal financial assistance to covered entities under this paragraph, the Secretary shall give priority to covered entities that support the resiliency of semiconductor supply chains for critical manufacturing industries in the United States.

(E)

In this paragraph, the term critical manufacturing industry

(i)

means an industry that is assigned a North American Industry Classification System code beginning with 31, 32, or 33, and for which the industry components that are assigned a North American Industry Classification System code beginning with the same 4 digits as the industry—

(I)

manufacture primary products and parts, the sum of which account for not less than 5 percent of the manufacturing value added by industry gross domestic product of the United States; and

(II)

employ individuals for primary products and parts manufacturing activities that, combined, account for not less than 5 percent of manufacturing employment in the United States; and

(ii)

may include any other manufacturing industry designated by the Secretary based on the relevance of the manufacturing industry to the national and economic security of the United States, including the impacts of job losses.

(F)

In this paragraph, the term mature technology node has the meaning given the term by the Secretary of Commerce.

(4)

Allocation authority

(A)

Submission of cost estimates

The President shall submit to Congress detailed account, program, and project allocations of the full amount made available under subsection (a)(2)—

(i)

for fiscal year 2022, not later than 90 days after the date of enactment of this Act; and

(ii)

for each fiscal year through 2026, as part of the annual budget submission of the President under section 1105(a) of title 31, United States Code.

(B)

Alternate allocation

(i)

In general

The Committees on Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the Senate may provide for alternate allocation of amounts made available under subsection (a)(2), including by account, program, and project.

(ii)

Allocation by President

(I)

No alternate allocations

If Congress has not enacted legislation establishing alternate allocations, including by account, program, and project, by the date on which the Act making full-year appropriations for the Department of Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies for the applicable fiscal year is enacted into law, only then shall amounts made available under subsection (a)(2) be allocated by the President or apportioned or allotted by account, program, and project pursuant to title 31, United States Code.

(II)

Insufficient alternate allocation

If Congress enacts legislation establishing alternate allocations, including by account, program, and project, for amounts made available under subsection (a)(2) that are less than the full amount appropriated under that subsection, the difference between the amount appropriated and the alternate allocation shall be allocated by the President and apportioned and allotted by account, program, and project pursuant to title 31, United States Code.

(b)

Chips for america defense fund

(1)

Establishment

There is established in the Treasury of the United States a fund to be known as the Creating Helpful Incentives to Produce Semiconductors (CHIPS) for America Defense Fund (referred to in this subsection as the Fund) to provide for research, development, test and evaluation, workforce development, and other requirements that are unique to the Department of Defense and the intelligence community, including those requirements that are necessary to carry out section 9903(b) of the William M. (Mac) Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021 (Public Law 116–283). Amounts in the Fund shall be transferred to and merged with accounts within the Department of Defense to be used for such purposes. Amounts in the Fund or transferred to and merged with accounts within the Department of Defense may not be used for construction of facilities.

(2)

Appropriation

In addition to amounts otherwise available for such purposes, there is appropriated to the Fund established in subsection (b)(1), out of amounts in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated—

(A)

for fiscal year 2022, $400,000,000, to remain available until September 30, 2022;

(B)

for fiscal year 2023, $400,000,000, to remain available until September 30, 2023;

(C)

for fiscal year 2024, $400,000,000, to remain available until September 30, 2024;

(D)

for fiscal year 2025, $400,000,000, to remain available until September 30, 2025; and

(E)

for fiscal year 2026, $400,000,000, to remain available until September 30, 2026.

(3)

Allocation authority

(A)

Submission of cost estimates

The President shall submit to Congress detailed account, program element, and project allocations of the full amount made available under subsection (b)(2)—

(i)

for fiscal year 2022, not later than 90 days after the date of enactment of this Act; and

(ii)

for each fiscal year through 2026, as part of the annual budget submission of the President under section 1105(a) of title 31, United States Code.

(B)

Alternate allocation

(i)

In general

The Committees on Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the Senate may provide for alternate allocation of amounts made available under subsection (b)(2), including by account, program element, and project.

(ii)

Allocation by President

(I)

No alternate allocations

If Congress has not enacted legislation establishing alternate allocations, including by account, program element, and project, by the date on which the Act making full-year appropriations for the Department of Defense for the applicable fiscal year is enacted into law, only then shall amounts made available under subsection (b)(2) be allocated by the President or apportioned or allotted by account, program element, and project pursuant to title 31, United States Code.

(II)

Insufficient alternate allocation

If Congress enacts legislation establishing alternate allocations, including by account, program element, and project, for amounts made available under subsection (b)(2) that are less than the full amount appropriated under that subsection, the difference between the amount appropriated and the alternate allocation shall be allocated by the President and apportioned and allotted by account, program element, and project pursuant to title 31, United States Code.

(c)

Chips for america international technology security and innovation fund

(1)

Establishment

There is established in the Treasury of the United States a fund to be known as the Creating Helpful Incentives to Produce Semiconductors (CHIPS) for America International Technology Security and Innovation Fund (referred to in this subsection as the Fund) to provide for international information and communications technology security and semiconductor supply chain activities, including to support the development and adoption of secure and trusted telecommunications technologies, secure semiconductors, secure semiconductors supply chains, and other emerging technologies and to carry out sections 9905 and 9202(a)(2) of the William M. (Mac) Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021 (Public Law 116–283), as appropriate. Amounts in the Fund shall be transferred by the Secretary of State to accounts within the Department of State, the United States Agency for International Development, the Export-Import Bank, and the United States International Development Finance Corporation, as appropriate, to be used for such purposes and under the terms and conditions of the account to which transferred.

(2)

Appropriation

(A)

In addition to amounts otherwise available for such purposes, there is appropriated to the Fund established in subsection (c)(1), out of amounts in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated—

(i)

for fiscal year 2022, $100,000,000, to remain available until September 30, 2026;

(ii)

for fiscal year 2023, $100,000,000, to remain available until September 30, 2027;

(iii)

for fiscal year 2024, $100,000,000, to remain available until September 30, 2028;

(iv)

for fiscal year 2025, $100,000,000, to remain available until September 30, 2029; and

(v)

for fiscal year 2026, $100,000,000, to remain available until September 30, 2030.

(B)

In carrying out this subsection, the Secretary of State may use up to $5,000,000 of the amounts made available in each fiscal year for the Fund for salaries and expenses, administration, and oversight purposes, of which $500,000 in each of fiscal years 2022 through 2026 shall be transferred to the Office of Inspector General of the Department of State to oversee expenditures under the Fund.

(3)

Allocation authority

(A)

Submission of cost estimates

The President shall submit to Congress detailed account, program, project, and activity allocations of the full amount made available under subsection (c)(2)—

(i)

for fiscal year 2022, not later than 90 days after the date of enactment of this Act; and

(ii)

for each fiscal year through 2026, as part of the annual budget submission of the President under section 1105(a) of title 31, United States Code.

(B)

Alternate allocation

(i)

In general

The Committees on Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the Senate may provide for alternate allocation of amounts made available under subsection (c)(2), including by account, program, project, and activity.

(ii)

Allocation by President

(I)

No alternate allocations

If Congress has not enacted legislation establishing alternate allocations, including by account, program, project, and activity, by the date on which the Act making full-year appropriations for the Department of State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs for the applicable fiscal year is enacted into law, only then shall amounts made available under subsection (c)(2) be allocated by the President or apportioned or allotted by account, program, project, and activity pursuant to title 31, United States Code.

(II)

Insufficient alternate allocation

If Congress enacts legislation establishing alternate allocations, including by account, program, project, and activity, for amounts made available under subsection (c)(2) that are less than the full amount appropriated under that subsection, the difference between the amount appropriated and the alternate allocation shall be allocated by the President and apportioned and allotted by account, program, project, and activity pursuant to title 31, United States Code.

(d)

Sequestration

Section 255(g)(1)(A) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 (2 U.S.C. 905(g)(1)(A)) is amended by inserting after Continuing Fund, Southwestern Power Administration (89–5649–0–2–271). the following:

Creating Helpful Incentives to Produce Semiconductors (CHIPS) for America Fund.

Creating Helpful Incentives to Produce Semiconductors (CHIPS) for America Defense Fund.

Creating Helpful Incentives to Produce Semiconductors (CHIPS) for America International Technology Security and Innovation Fund.

.

(e)

Emergency designation

(1)

In general

The amounts provided under this section are designated as an emergency requirement pursuant to section 4(g) of the Statutory Pay-As-You-Go Act of 2010 (2 U.S.C. 933(g)).

(2)

Designation in Senate

In the Senate, this section is designated as an emergency requirement pursuant to section 4112(a) of H. Con. Res. 71 (115th Congress), the concurrent resolution on the budget for fiscal year 2018.

1003.

Appropriations for wireless supply chain innovation

(a)

Direct appropriations

In addition to amounts otherwise available for such purposes, there is appropriated to the Public Wireless Supply Chain Innovation Fund established under section 9202(a)(1) of the William M. (Mac) Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021 (Public Law 116–283), out of amounts in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, $1,500,000,000 for fiscal year 2022, to remain available through September 30, 2031.

(b)

Use of funds, administration, and oversight

Of the amounts made available under subsection (a)—

(1)

not more than 5 percent of the amounts allocated pursuant to subsection (c) in a given fiscal year may be used by the Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Communications and Information to administer the programs funded from the Public Wireless Supply Chain Innovation Fund; and

(2)

not less than $2,000,000 per fiscal year shall be transferred to the Office of Inspector General of the Department of Commerce for oversight related to activities conducted using amounts provided under this section.

(c)

Allocation authority

(1)

Submission of cost estimates

The President shall submit to Congress detailed account, program, and project allocations of the amount recommended for allocation in a fiscal year from amounts made available under subsection (a)—

(A)

for fiscal year 2022, not later than 90 days after the date of enactment of this Act; and

(B)

for each subsequent fiscal year through 2031, as part of the annual budget submission of the President under section 1105(a) of title 31, United States Code.

(2)

Alternate allocation

(A)

In general

The Committees on Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the Senate may provide for alternate allocation of amounts recommended for allocation in a given fiscal year from amounts made available under subsection (a), including by account, program, and project.

(B)

Allocation by President

(i)

No alternate allocations

If Congress has not enacted legislation establishing alternate allocations, including by account, program, and project, by the date on which the Act making full-year appropriations for the Departments of Commerce and Justice, Science, and Related Agencies for the applicable fiscal year is enacted into law, only then shall amounts recommended for allocation for that fiscal year from amounts made available under subsection (a) be allocated by the President or apportioned or allotted by account, program, and project pursuant to title 31, United States Code.

(ii)

Insufficient alternate allocation

If Congress enacts legislation establishing alternate allocations, including by account, program, and project, for amounts recommended for allocation in a given fiscal year from amounts made available under subsection (a) that are less than the full amount recommended for allocation for that fiscal year, the difference between the amount recommended for allocation and the alternate allocation shall be allocated by the President and apportioned and allotted by account, program, and project pursuant to title 31, United States Code.

(d)

Sequestration

Section 255(g)(1)(A) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 (2 U.S.C. 905(g)(1)(A)) is amended by inserting after Postal Service Fund (18–4020–0–3–372). the following:

Public Wireless Supply Chain Innovation Fund.

.

(e)

Emergency designation

(1)

In general

The amounts provided under this section are designated as an emergency requirement pursuant to section 4(g) of the Statutory Pay-As-You-Go Act of 2010 (2 U.S.C. 933(g)).

(2)

Designation in Senate

In the Senate, this section is designated as an emergency requirement pursuant to section 4112(a) of H. Con. Res. 71 (115th Congress), the concurrent resolution on the budget for fiscal year 2018.

B

Endless Frontier Act

2001.

Short title; table of contents

(a)

Short title

This division may be cited as the Endless Frontier Act.

(b)

Table of contents

The table of contents of this division is as follows:

DIVISION B—Endless Frontier Act

Sec. 2001. Short title; table of contents.

Sec. 2002. Definitions.

Sec. 2003. Sense of Congress.

Sec. 2004. Interagency working group.

Sec. 2005. Key technology focus areas.

TITLE I—NSF Technology and Innovation

Sec. 2101. Definitions.

Sec. 2102. Directorate establishment and purpose.

Sec. 2103. Personnel management.

Sec. 2104. Innovation centers.

Sec. 2105. Transition of NSF programs.

Sec. 2106. Providing scholarships, fellowships, and other student support.

Sec. 2107. Research and development.

Sec. 2108. Test beds.

Sec. 2109. Academic technology transfer.

Sec. 2110. Capacity-building program for developing universities.

Sec. 2111. Technical assistance.

Sec. 2112. Coordination of activities.

Sec. 2113. Reporting requirements.

Sec. 2114. Hands-on learning program.

Sec. 2115. Intellectual property protection.

Sec. 2116. Authorization of appropriations for the Foundation.

Sec. 2117. Authorization of appropriations for the Department of Energy.

Sec. 2118. Authorization of appropriations for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.

TITLE II—NSF research, STEM, and geographic diversity initiatives

Sec. 2201. Chief Diversity Officer of the NSF.

Sec. 2202. Programs to address the STEM workforce.

Sec. 2203. Emerging research institution pilot program.

Sec. 2204. Personnel management authorities for the Foundation.

Sec. 2205. Advanced Technological Manufacturing Act.

Sec. 2206. Intramural emerging institutions pilot program.

Sec. 2207. Public-private partnerships.

Sec. 2208. AI Scholarship-for-Service Act.

Sec. 2209. Geographic diversity.

Sec. 2210. Rural STEM Education Act.

Sec. 2211. Quantum Network Infrastructure and Workforce Development Act.

Sec. 2212. Supporting Early-Career Researchers Act.

Sec. 2213. Advancing Precision Agriculture Capabilities Act.

Sec. 2214. Critical minerals mining research.

Sec. 2215. Caregiver policies.

Sec. 2216. Presidential awards.

Sec. 2217. Bioeconomy Research and Development Act of 2021.

Sec. 2218. Microgravity utilization policy.

TITLE III—Research security

Sec. 2301. National Science Foundation research security.

Sec. 2302. Research security and integrity information sharing analysis organization.

Sec. 2303. Foreign government talent recruitment program prohibition.

Sec. 2304. Additional requirements for Directorate research security.

Sec. 2305. Protecting research from cyber theft.

Sec. 2306. International standards development.

Sec. 2307. Research funds accounting.

Sec. 2308. Plan with respect to sensitive or controlled information and background screening.

TITLE IV—Regional innovation capacity

Sec. 2401. Regional technology hubs.

Sec. 2402. Manufacturing USA Program.

Sec. 2403. Establishment of expansion awards program in Hollings Manufacturing Extension Partnership and authorization of appropriations for the Partnership.

Sec. 2404. National Manufacturing Advisory Council.

TITLE V—Miscellaneous

Sec. 2501. Strategy and report on economic security, science, research, and innovation to support the national security strategy.

Sec. 2502. Person or entity of concern prohibition.

Sec. 2503. Study on emerging science and technology challenges faced by the United States and recommendations to address them.

Sec. 2504. Report on global semiconductor shortage.

Sec. 2505. Supply chain resiliency program.

Sec. 2506. Semiconductor incentives.

Sec. 2507. Research Investment to Spark the Economy Act.

Sec. 2508. Office of Manufacturing and Industrial Innovation Policy.

Sec. 2509. Telecommunications Workforce Training Grant Program.

Sec. 2510. Country Of Origin Labeling Online Act.

Sec. 2511. Country of origin labeling for king crab and tanner crab.

Sec. 2512. Internet exchanges and submarine cables.

Sec. 2513. Study of sister city partnerships operating within the United States involving foreign communities in countries with significant public sector corruption.

Sec. 2514. Prohibition on transfer, assignment, or disposition of construction permits and station licenses to entities subject to undue influence by the Chinese Communist Party or the Government of the People's Republic of China.

Sec. 2515. Limitation on nuclear cooperation with the People’s Republic of China.

Sec. 2516. Certification.

Sec. 2517. Fairness and due process in standards-setting bodies.

Sec. 2518. Shark fin sales elimination.

Sec. 2519. Sense of Congress on forced labor.

Sec. 2520. Open network architecture.

Sec. 2521. Combatting sexual harassment in science.

Sec. 2522. National Science Corps.

Sec. 2523. Annual report on foreign research.

Sec. 2524. Accelerating Unmanned Maritime Systems Research.

Sec. 2525. Foundation funding to institutions hosting or supporting confucius institutes.

Sec. 2526. Supporting documents.

Sec. 2527. BASIC Research.

Sec. 2528. Foundation for Energy Security and Innovation.

TITLE VI—Space matters

Subtitle A—SPACE Act

Sec. 2601. Short title.

Sec. 2602. Sense of Congress.

Sec. 2603. Definitions.

Sec. 2604. Space situational awareness data, information, and services: provision to non-United States Government entities.

Sec. 2605. Centers of Excellence for Space Situational Awareness.

Subtitle B—National Aeronautics and Space Administration Authorization Act

Sec. 2611. Short title.

Sec. 2612. Definitions.

PART I—Authorization of appropriations

Sec. 2613. Authorization of appropriations.

PART II—Human spaceflight and exploration

Sec. 2614. Competitiveness within the human landing system program.

Sec. 2615. Space launch system configurations.

Sec. 2616. Advanced spacesuits.

Sec. 2617. Acquisition of domestic space transportation and logistics resupply services.

Sec. 2618. Rocket engine test infrastructure.

Sec. 2619. Pearl River maintenance.

Sec. 2620. Value of International Space Station and capabilities in low-Earth orbit.

Sec. 2621. Extension and modification relating to International Space Station.

Sec. 2622. Department of Defense activities on International Space Station.

Sec. 2623. Commercial development in low-Earth orbit.

Sec. 2624. Maintaining a national laboratory in space.

Sec. 2625. International Space Station national laboratory; property rights in inventions.

Sec. 2626. Data first produced during non-NASA scientific use of the ISS national laboratory.

Sec. 2627. Payments received for commercial space-enabled production on the ISS.

Sec. 2628. Stepping stone approach to exploration.

Sec. 2629. Technical amendments relating to Artemis missions.

PART III—Science

Sec. 2631. Science priorities.

Sec. 2632. Lunar discovery program.

Sec. 2633. Search for life.

Sec. 2634. James Webb Space Telescope.

Sec. 2635. Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope.

Sec. 2636. Study on satellite servicing for science missions.

Sec. 2637. Earth science missions and programs.

Sec. 2638. Life science and physical science research.

Sec. 2639. Science missions to Mars.

Sec. 2640. Planetary Defense Coordination Office.

Sec. 2641. Suborbital science flights.

Sec. 2642. Earth science data and observations.

Sec. 2643. Sense of Congress on small satellite science.

Sec. 2644. Sense of Congress on commercial space services.

Sec. 2645. Procedures for identifying and addressing alleged violations of scientific integrity policy.

PART IV—Aeronautics

Sec. 2646. Short title.

Sec. 2647. Definitions.

Sec. 2648. Experimental aircraft projects.

Sec. 2649. Unmanned aircraft systems.

Sec. 2650. 21st Century Aeronautics Capabilities Initiative.

Sec. 2651. Sense of Congress on on-demand air transportation.

Sec. 2652. Sense of Congress on hypersonic technology research.

PART V—Space technology

Sec. 2653. Space Technology Mission Directorate.

Sec. 2654. Flight opportunities program.

Sec. 2655. Small Spacecraft Technology Program.

Sec. 2656. Nuclear propulsion technology.

Sec. 2657. Mars-forward technologies.

Sec. 2658. Prioritization of low-enriched uranium technology.

Sec. 2659. Sense of Congress on next-generation communications technology.

Sec. 2660. Lunar surface technologies.

PART VI—STEM engagement

Sec. 2661. Sense of Congress.

Sec. 2662. STEM education engagement activities.

Sec. 2663. Skilled technical education outreach program.

Sec. 2664. National space grant college and fellowship program.

PART VII—Workforce and industrial base

Sec. 2665. Appointment and compensation pilot program.

Sec. 2666. Establishment of multi-institution consortia.

Sec. 2667. Expedited access to technical talent and expertise.

Sec. 2668. Report on industrial base for civil space missions and operations.

Sec. 2669. Separations and retirement incentives.

Sec. 2670. Confidentiality of medical quality assurance records.

PART VIII—Miscellaneous provisions

Sec. 2671. Contracting authority.

Sec. 2672. Authority for transaction prototype projects and follow-on production contracts.

Sec. 2673. Protection of data and information from public disclosure.

Sec. 2674. Physical security modernization.

Sec. 2675. Lease of non-excess property.

Sec. 2676. Cybersecurity.

Sec. 2677. Limitation on cooperation with the People's Republic of China.

Sec. 2678. Consideration of issues related to contracting with entities receiving assistance from or affiliated with the People’s Republic of China.

Sec. 2679. Small satellite launch services program.

Sec. 2680. 21st century space launch infrastructure.

Sec. 2681. Missions of national need.

Sec. 2682. Drinking water well replacement for Chincoteague, Virginia.

Sec. 2683. Passenger carrier use.

Sec. 2684. Use of commercial near-space balloons.

Sec. 2685. President’s Space Advisory Board.

Sec. 2686. Initiative on technologies for noise and emissions reductions.

Sec. 2687. Remediation of sites contaminated with trichloroethylene.

Sec. 2688. Review on preference for domestic suppliers.

Sec. 2689. Report on use of commercial spaceports licensed by the Federal Aviation Administration.

Sec. 2690. Active orbital debris mitigation.

Sec. 2691. Study on commercial communications services.

2002.

Definitions

Unless otherwise specified, in this division:

(1)

Apprenticeship

The term apprenticeship means an apprenticeship registered under the Act of August 16, 1937 (commonly known as the National Apprenticeship Act; 50 Stat. 664, chapter 663; 29 U.S.C. 50 et seq.) that meets the standards of subpart A of part 29 and part 30 of title 29, Code of Federal Regulations.

(2)

Director

The term Director means the Director of the National Science Foundation.

(3)

Directorate

The term Directorate means the Directorate for Technology and Innovation established under section 2102.

(4)

Emerging research institution

The term emerging research institution means an institution of higher education with an established undergraduate or graduate program that has, on average for the 3 years prior to an application for an award under this division, received less than $50,000,000 in Federal research funding.

(5)

EPSCoR

The term EPSCoR means the Established Program to Stimulate Competitive Research under section 113 of the National Science Foundation Authorization Act of 1988 (42 U.S.C. 1862g).

(6)

Foundation

The term Foundation means the National Science Foundation.

(7)

Historically Black college or university

The term historically Black college or university has the meaning given the term part B institution in section 322 of the Higher Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1061).

(8)

Institution of higher education

The term institution of higher education has the meaning given the term in section 101 of the Higher Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1001).

(9)

Key technology focus areas

The term key technology focus areas means the areas included on the most recent list under section 2005.

(10)

Minority-serving institution

The term minority-serving institution means an institution described in section 371(a) of the Higher Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1067q(a)).

(11)

National laboratory

The term National Laboratory, without respect to capitalization, has the meaning given the term in section 2 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (42 U.S.C. 15801).

(12)

STEM

The term STEM means the academic and professional disciplines of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, including computer science.

2003.

Sense of Congress

It is the sense of Congress that—

(1)

the National Science Foundation, the Department of Energy and its National Laboratories, and other key Federal agencies have carried out vital work supporting basic and applied research to create knowledge that is a key driver of the economy of the United States and a critical component of national security;

(2)

openness to diverse perspectives and a focus on freedom from censorship and political bias will continue to make educational and research institutions in the United States beacons to thousands of students from across the world;

(3)

increasing research and technology transfer investments, building regional capacity and reducing geographic disparity, strengthening supply chains, and increasing capabilities in key technology focus areas will enhance the competitive advantage and leadership of the United States in the global economy;

(4)

the Federal Government must utilize the full talent and potential of the entire Nation by avoiding undue geographic concentration of research and education funding, encouraging broader participation of populations underrepresented in STEM, and collaborating with non-government partners to ensure the leadership of the United States in technological innovation; and

(5)

authorization and funding for investments in research, education, technology transfer, intellectual property, manufacturing, and other core strengths of the United States innovation ecosystem, including at the National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy, should be done on a bipartisan basis.

2004.

Interagency working group

(a)

Establishment

The Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy, acting through the National Science and Technology Council, shall establish or designate an interagency working group to coordinate the activities specified in subsection (c).

(b)

Composition

The interagency working group shall be composed of the following members (or their designees), who may be organized into subcommittees, as appropriate:

(1)

The Secretary of Commerce.

(2)

The Director of the National Science Foundation.

(3)

The Secretary of Energy.

(4)

The Secretary of Defense.

(5)

The Director of the National Economic Council.

(6)

The Director of the Office of Management and Budget.

(7)

The Secretary of Health and Human Services.

(8)

The Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

(9)

The Secretary of Agriculture.

(10)

The Director of National Intelligence.

(11)

The Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

(12)

Such other Federal officials as the Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy considers appropriate, including members of the National Science and Technology Council Committee on Technology.

(c)

Coordination

The interagency working group shall seek to ensure that the activities of different Federal agencies enhance and complement, but, as appropriate, do not duplicate, efforts being carried out by another Federal agency, with a focus on—

(1)

the activities of the National Science Foundation Technology and Innovation Directorate in the key technology focus areas, such as within the innovation centers under section 2104 and test beds under section 2108 under this division;

(2)

the activities of the Department of Commerce under this division, including regional technology hubs under section 28 of the Stevenson-Wydler Act of 1980 (15 U.S.C. 13701 et seq.), as added by section 2401 of this division, the Manufacturing USA Program established under section 34(b)(1) of the National Institute of Standards and Technology Act (15 U.S.C. 278s(b)(1)), and the Hollings Manufacturing Extension Partnership;

(3)

the activities of the Department of Energy in the key technology focus areas, including at the national laboratories, and at Federal laboratories, as defined in section 4 of the Stevenson-Wydler Technology Innovation Act of 1980 (15 U.S.C. 3703), and facilities and user facilities operated in partnership with such national laboratories or the Department of Energy; and

(4)

any other program that the Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy determines involves research and development with respect to the key technology focus areas.

(d)

Report

The interagency working group shall—

(1)

by not later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this division—

(A)

conduct an initial review of Federal programs and resources with respect to the key technology focus areas identified pursuant to section 2005(a), in order to—

(i)

assess current level of efforts and characterize existing research infrastructure, as of the date of the review;

(ii)

identify potential areas of overlap or duplication with respect to the key technology focus areas; and

(iii)

identify potential cross-agency collaborations and joint funding opportunities; and

(B)

submit a report regarding the review described in subparagraph (A) to Congress; and

(C)

seek stakeholder input and recommendations in the course of such review; and

(2)

shall carry out the annual reviews and updates required under section 2005.

(e)

Conflicts

If any conflicts between Federal agencies arise while carrying out the activities under this section, the President shall make the final decision regarding resolution of the conflict.

2005.

Key technology focus areas

(a)

In General

(1)

Initial list

The initial key technology focus areas are:

(A)

Artificial intelligence, machine learning, autonomy, and related advances.

(B)

High performance computing, semiconductors, and advanced computer hardware and software.

(C)

Quantum information science and technology.

(D)

Robotics, automation, and advanced manufacturing.

(E)

Natural and anthropogenic disaster prevention or mitigation.

(F)

Advanced communications technology and immersive technology.

(G)

Biotechnology, medical technology, genomics, and synthetic biology.

(H)

Data storage, data management, distributed ledger technologies, and cybersecurity, including biometrics.

(I)

Advanced energy and industrial efficiency technologies, such as batteries and advanced nuclear technologies, including but not limited to for the purposes of electric generation (consistent with section 15 of the National Science Foundation Act of 1950 (42 U.S.C. 1874).

(J)

Advanced materials science, including composites and 2D materials.

(2)

Review and updates

The Director and the Secretary of Energy, in coordination with the interagency working group established under section 2004 and in consultation with the Director of National Intelligence and the Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, shall annually review, and update as required, the list of key technology focus areas for purposes of this division.

(b)

Annual review

As part of the annual review and update process required by section 2005(a)(2), the Director of the National Science Foundation and the Secretary of Energy, in coordination with the interagency working group established under section 2004—

(1)

shall consider input from relevant industries;

(2)

may consider the challenges and recommendations identified in the report required by section 2503 and in other relevant reports, such as technology and global trend reports from the defense and intelligence communities;

(3)

shall consider the potential impact of the key technology focus areas on addressing national challenges, including competitive and security threats to the United States and to United States industries, including agriculture; and

(4)

subject to the limitation under subsection (c), may add or delete key technology focus areas in light of shifting national needs or competitive threats to the United States (including for reasons of the United States or other countries having advanced or fallen behind in a technological area).

(c)

Limit on key technology focus areas

Not more than 10 key technology focus areas shall be included on the list of key technology focus areas at any time. Engineering and exploration relevant to the other key technology focus areas described in this section shall be considered part of the relevant key technology focus area.

(d)

Reporting

At the conclusion of the annual review and update process required by section 2005(a)(2), the Director and the Secretary of Energy shall deliver a report to Congress detailing—

(1)

the key technology focus areas and rationale for their selection;

(2)

the role of the Foundation, the Department of Energy, and other Federal entities, as relevant, in advancing the key technology focus areas; and

(3)

the impact, including to the academic research community, of any changes to the key technology focus areas.

(e)

Detailed description

The National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy shall, in coordination with the Office of Management and Budget, submit as part of their annual budget requests to Congress, a detailed description of the activities to be funded under this division, including an explanation of how the requested funding is complementary and not redundant of programs, efforts, and infrastructure undertaken or supported by other relevant Federal agencies.

(f)

National academies

Not later than 5 years after the date of enactment of this division, the Director shall contract with the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine to conduct a review of the key technology focus areas, including whether Federal investment in the key technology focus areas have resulted in new domestic manufacturing capacity and job creation.

I

NSF Technology and Innovation

2101.

Definitions

In this title:

(1)

Designated country

(A)

In general

The term designated country

(i)

except as provided in clause (ii), means—

(I)

Australia;

(II)

Canada;

(III)

New Zealand;

(IV)

the United Kingdom;

(V)

the State of Israel;

(VI)

Taiwan; and

(VII)

any other country that has been approved and designated in writing by the President for purposes of this division, after providing—

(aa)

not less than 30 days of advance notification and explanation to the relevant congressional committees before the designation; and

(bb)

in-person briefings to such committees, if requested during the 30-day advance notification period described in item (aa); and

(ii)

excludes any country that takes actions to boycott, divest from, or sanction Israel.

(B)

Actions to boycott, divest from, or sanction Israel

For purposes of subparagraph (A)(ii), the term actions to boycott, divest from, or sanction Israel has the meaning given such term in section 102(b)(20)(B) of the Bipartisan Congressional Trade Priorities and Accountability Act of 2015 (19 U.S.C. 4201(b)(20)(B)).

(2)

Labor organization

The term labor organization has the meaning given the term in section 2(5) of the National Labor Relations Act (29 U.S.C. 152(5)), except that such term shall also include—

(A)

any organization composed of labor organizations, such as a labor union federation or a State or municipal labor body; and

(B)

any organization which would be included in the definition for such term under such section 2(5) but for the fact that the organization represents—

(i)

individuals employed by the United States, any wholly owned Government corporation, any Federal Reserve Bank, or any State or political subdivision thereof;

(ii)

individuals employed by persons subject to the Railway Labor Act (45 U.S.C. 151 et seq.); or

(iii)

individuals employed as agricultural laborers.

(3)

National laboratory

The term National Laboratory has the meaning given the term in section 2 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (42 U.S.C. 15801).

(4)

Tribal College or university

The term Tribal College or University has the meaning given the term in section 316(b)(3) of the Higher Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1059c(b)(3)).

2102.

Directorate establishment and purpose

(a)

Establishment of directorate for technology and innovation

Subject to the availability of appropriations and not later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this division, the Director shall establish a Directorate for Technology and Innovation in the Foundation.

(b)

Purposes

The Directorate shall further the following purposes:

(1)

Strengthening the leadership of the United States in critical technologies, including as relevant to the critical national needs described in section 7018 of the America COMPETES Act (42 U.S.C. 1862o–5).

(2)

Addressing and mitigating technology challenges integral to the geostrategic position of the United States through the activities authorized by this title.

(3)

Enhancing the competitiveness of the United States by improving education in the key technology focus areas and attracting more students to such areas at all levels of education.

(4)

Accelerating the translation and development of scientific advances in the key technology focus areas into processes and products in the United States.

(5)

Utilizing the full potential of the United States workforce by avoiding undue geographic concentration of research and development and education funding across the United States, and encouraging broader participation in the key technology focus areas by populations underrepresented in STEM.

(6)

Ensuring the programmatic work of the Directorate and Foundation incorporates a workforce perspective from labor organizations and workforce training organizations.

(c)

Activities

The Directorate—

(1)

shall support basic and applied research, and technology development of such research, including through awards to individual researchers, entities, or consortia and through diverse funding mechanisms and models;

(2)

shall identify and develop opportunities to coordinate and collaborate on research, development, and commercialization—

(A)

with other directorates and offices of the Foundation;

(B)

with stakeholders in academia, the private sector, and nonprofit entities; and

(C)

with other Federal research agencies, as well as State and local governments;

(3)

shall provide awards for research and development projects designed to achieve specific technology metrics or objectives;

(4)

may support research and technology development infrastructure, including testbeds, to advance the development, operation, integration, and deployment of innovation;

(5)

shall identify and develop opportunities to reduce barriers for technology transfer, including intellectual property frameworks between academia and industry, nonprofit entities, and the venture capital communities;

(6)

shall build capacity for research at institutions of higher education across the United States;

(7)

shall partner with other directorates and offices of the Foundation for projects or research, including—

(A)

to pursue basic questions about natural, human, and physical phenomena that could enable advances in the key technology focus areas;

(B)

to study questions that could affect the design (including human interfaces), safety, security, operation, deployment, or the social and ethical consequences of technologies in the key technology focus areas, including the development of technologies that complement or enhance the abilities of workers and impact of specific innovations on domestic jobs and equitable opportunity; and

(C)

to further the creation of a domestic workforce capable of advancing, using, and adapting to key technology focus areas and understanding and improving the impact of key technology focus areas on STEM teaching and learning by advancing the key technology focus areas, including engaging relevant partners in research and innovation programs;

(8)

may make awards under the SBIR and STTR programs (as defined in section 9(e) of the Small Business Act (15 U.S.C. 638(e)); and

(9)

may enter into and perform such contracts, make such financial assistance awards, carry out such other transactions, or make such other arrangements, or modifications thereof, as may be necessary in the conduct of the work of the Directorate and on such terms as the Director considers appropriate, in furtherance of the purposes of this title.

(d)

Assistant director

(1)

Appointment

The Director shall appoint an Assistant Director for the Directorate, in the same manner as other Assistant Directors of the Foundation are appointed.

(2)

Qualifications

Each Assistant Director for the Directorate shall be an individual, who by reason of professional background and experience, is specially qualified to advise the Foundation on all matters pertaining to research, development, and commercialization at the Foundation, including partnerships with the private sector and other users of Foundation funded research.

(e)

Considerations

After completion of the studies regarding emerging technologies conducted by the Secretary of Commerce under title XV of division FF of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 (Public Law 116–260), the Director shall consider the results of such studies in carrying out the activities of the Directorate.

2103.

Personnel management

(a)

Personnel

The Director shall establish and maintain within the Directorate a staff with sufficient qualifications and expertise to enable the Directorate to carry out its responsibilities under this title.

(b)

Program directors

(1)

Designation

The Director may designate employees to serve as program directors for the programs established within the Directorate pursuant to the responsibilities established under paragraph (2). The Director shall ensure that program directors—

(A)

have expertise in the key technology focus areas; and

(B)

come from a variety of backgrounds, including industry, and from a variety of institutions of higher education.

(2)

Responsibilities

A program director of a program of the Directorate shall be responsible for—

(A)

establishing research and development goals for the program, including through the convening of workshops and conferring with outside experts and by publicizing the goals of the program to the public and private sectors;

(B)

soliciting proposals from entities to conduct research in areas of particular promise within key technology focus areas, especially areas that the private sector or the Federal Government are not likely to undertake alone;

(C)

identifying areas for research and development;

(D)

building research collaborations for carrying out the program;

(E)

reviewing applications for projects to be supported under the program, and considering—

(i)

the novelty and scientific and technical merit of the proposed projects;

(ii)

broader impacts criteria under section 526 of the National Science Foundation Authorization Act of 2010 (42 U.S.C. 1862p–14);

(iii)

the demonstrated capabilities of the applicants to successfully carry out the proposed project;

(iv)

the consideration by the applicant of future commercial applications of the project, including the feasibility of partnering with 1 or more commercial entities; and

(v)

such other criteria as are established by the Director; and

(F)

monitoring the progress of projects supported under the program and recommending program restructure or termination, as needed.

(3)

Terms

Program directors of the Directorate may be appointed by the Director for a limited term, renewable at the discretion of the Director.

(c)

Selection criteria and report

(1)

Peer review

The Directorate may use a peer review process to inform the selection of award recipients.

(2)

Report

Not later than 18 months after the establishment of the Directorate, the Director shall prepare and submit a report to Congress regarding the use of alternative methods for the selection of award recipients and the distribution of funding to recipients, as compared to the traditional peer review process.

(d)

Rule of construction

Nothing in this section shall be construed to modify the authority of the Director or the National Science Board with respect to the selection of recipients for funding from the Foundation.

2104.

Innovation centers

(a)

University technology center program

(1)

In general

From amounts made available to the Directorate, the Director shall establish a program in the Directorate to make awards, through a competitive selection process, to eligible entities to establish university technology centers.

(2)

Purpose

The purpose of the university technology centers shall be to—

(A)

conduct multi-disciplinary, collaborative basic and applied research, relevant to at least one of the key technology focus areas;

(B)

leverage the expertise of multi-disciplinary and multi-sector partners, including partners from private industry;

(C)

further the development, deployment, and commercialization of innovations, including inventions, in the key technology focus areas, including those derived from the activities of the university technology center; and

(D)

support the development of scientific, innovation, entrepreneurial, and educational capacity within the region of the university technology center.

(3)

Use of funds

University technology centers established under this subsection may use support provided—

(A)

to carry out research to advance innovation in the key technology focus areas;

(B)

for technology development activities such as proof-of-concept development, prototyping, design modification, experimental development, and other actions to reduce the cost, time, and risk of commercializing new technologies;

(C)

for the costs of equipment and cyberinfrastructure;

(D)

for the costs associated with technology transfer and commercialization, including patenting and licensing; or

(E)

for operations and staff.

(4)

Selection process

In selecting recipients under this subsection, the Director shall consider, in addition to the scientific and technical merit of the proposal—

(A)

maximizing regional and geographic diversity of the university technology centers, including by considering rural-serving institutions of higher education (as defined in section 861(b) of the Higher Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1161a(b));

(B)

the extent to which the applicant’s proposal would broaden participation by populations underrepresented in STEM;

(C)

the capacity of the applicant to engage industry, labor, and other appropriate organizations and, where applicable, contribute to growth in domestic manufacturing capacity and job creation;

(D)

in the case of a consortium, the extent to which the proposal includes institutions listed in paragraph (7)(C)(ii);

(E)

the amount of funds from industry organizations described in paragraph (5)(A)(ii) the applicant would use towards establishing the university technology center;

(F)

the plan and capability of the applicant to take measures to prevent the inappropriate use of the research and technology of the center, including research results, data, and intellectual property, as appropriate and consistent with the requirements of the relevant award; and

(G)

the plan and capability of the applicant to support proof-of-concept development and prototyping as well as technology transfer and commercialization activities.

(5)

Requirements

(A)

In general

The Director shall ensure that any eligible entity receiving an award under this subsection has—

(i)

the capacity or the ability to acquire the capacity to advance the purposes described in section 2102(b); and

(ii)

secured contributions for establishing the university technology center under this subsection from industry or other non-Federal organizations in an amount not less than 10 percent of the total amount of the award the eligible entity would receive under this subsection.

(B)

Consortium eligibility

To be eligible to receive an award for the establishment and operation of a university technology center, a consortium shall be composed of not fewer than 2 entities as described in paragraph (7)(C) and operate subject to a binding agreement, entered into by each member of the consortium, that documents—

(i)

the proposed partnership agreement, including the governance and management structure of the university technology center;

(ii)

measures the consortium will undertake to enable cost-effective implementation of activities under paragraph (3);

(iii)

a proposed budget, including financial contributions from non-Federal sources; and

(iv)

the plan for ownership and use of any intellectual property developed by the center.

(6)

Support of regional technology hubs

Each university technology center established under this subsection may support and participate in, as appropriate, the activities of any regional technology hub designated under section 28 of the Stevenson-Wydler Technology Innovation Act of 1980 (15 U.S.C. 3701 et seq.), as added by section 2401 of this division.

(7)

Eligible entity

In this subsection, the term eligible entity means—

(A)

an individual institution of higher education;

(B)

a nonprofit entity; or

(C)

a consortium that—

(i)

shall include and be led by an institution of higher education or by a nonprofit entity, designed to support technology development;

(ii)

shall include 1 or more institution that is—

(I)

a historically Black college or university;

(II)

a Tribal College or University;

(III)

a minority-serving institution (or an institution of higher education with an established STEM capacity building program focused on traditionally underrepresented populations in STEM, including Native Hawaiians, Alaska Natives, and Indians);

(IV)

an institution that participates in the Established Program to Stimulate Competitive Research under section 113 of the National Science Foundation Authorization Act of 1988 (42 U.S.C. 1862g);

(V)

an emerging research institution; or

(VI)

a community college; and

(iii)

may include 1 or more—

(I)

additional entities described in subparagraph (A) or (B);

(II)

industry entities, including startups, small businesses, and public-private partnerships;

(III)

economic development organizations or venture development organizations, as such terms are defined in section 28(a) of the Stevenson-Wydler Technology Innovation Act of 1980 (15 U.S.C. 13701 et seq.), as added by section 2401 of this division;

(IV)

National Laboratories;

(V)

Federal laboratories, as defined in section 4 of the Stevenson-Wydler Technology Innovation Act of 1980 (15 U.S.C. 3703);

(VI)

Federal research facilities;

(VII)

labor organizations;

(VIII)

entities described in subparagraph (A) or (B) from allied or partner countries;

(IX)

other entities if determined by the Director to be vital to the success of the program;

(X)

binational research and development foundations and funds, excluding foreign entities of concern, as defined in section 2307; and

(XI)

Engineer Research and Development Center laboratories of the Army Corps of Engineers.

(b)

Innovation institute

(1)

In general

The Director shall establish innovation institutes to further the research, development, and commercialization of innovation in the key technology focus areas.

(2)

Partnerships

(A)

In general

Each innovation institute shall be comprised of a partnership including 2 or more of the following entities:

(i)

An institution of higher education.

(ii)

A for-profit company.

(iii)

A nonprofit organization.

(iv)

A Federal agency.

(v)

Another entity, if that entity is determined by the Director to be vital to the success of the program.

(B)

Co-equal

Each entity comprising the institute shall, to the extent practicable, work as co-equal partners in terms of funding and research efforts in support of the institute.

(C)

Institutional or organizational level

The Director shall work to ensure that such partnerships exist at the institutional or organization level, rather than solely at the principal investigator level.

(3)

Cost share

To the extent practicable, not less than half of the funding for an institute shall be provided by non-Federal entities.

(c)

Number of centers and institutes established

The Director shall endeavor to establish a balance in the number of university technology centers and innovation institutes.

2105.

Transition of NSF programs

The Director may transition the management of existing programs of the National Science Foundation that conduct activities in addition to basic research to the Directorate, including—

(1)

Convergence Accelerator;

(2)

Industry-University Cooperative Research Centers;

(3)

National AI Research Institutes;

(4)

Innovation Corps (I-Corps), as described in section 601 of the American Innovation and Competitiveness Act (42 U.S.C. 1862s–8); and

(5)

any other programs that the Director considers appropriate.

2106.

Providing scholarships, fellowships, and other student support

(a)

In general

The Director, acting through the Directorate, shall fund undergraduate scholarships (including at community colleges), graduate fellowships and traineeships, and postdoctoral awards in the key technology focus areas.

(b)

Implementation

The Director may carry out subsection (a) by making awards—

(1)

directly to students; and

(2)

to institutions of higher education or consortia of institutions of higher education, including those institutions or consortia involved in operating university technology centers established under section 2104(a).

(c)

Broadening participation

In carrying out this section, the Director shall take steps to increase the participation of populations that are underrepresented in STEM, which may include—

(1)

establishing or augmenting programs targeted at populations that are underrepresented in STEM;

(2)

supporting traineeships or other relevant programs at minority-serving institutions (or institutions of higher education with an established STEM capacity building program focused on traditionally underrepresented populations in STEM, including Native Hawaiians, Alaska Natives, and Indians);

(3)

addressing current and expected gaps in the availability or skills of the STEM workforce, or addressing needs of the STEM workforce, including by increasing educational capacity at institutions and by prioritizing awards to United States citizens, permanent residents, and individuals that will grow the domestic workforce; and

(4)

addressing geographic diversity in the STEM workforce.

(d)

Innovation

In carrying out this section, the Director shall encourage innovation in graduate education, including through encouraging institutions of higher education to offer graduate students opportunities to gain experience in industry or Government as part of their graduate training, and through support for students in professional masters programs related to the key technology focus areas.

(e)

Areas of funding support

Subject to the availability of funds to carry out this section, the Director shall—

(1)

issue—

(A)

postdoctoral awards,

(B)

graduate fellowships and traineeships, inclusive of the NSF Research Traineeships and fellowships awarded under the Graduate Research Fellowship Program; and

(C)

scholarships, including undergraduate scholarships, research experiences, and internships, including—

(i)

scholarships to attend community colleges; and

(ii)

research experiences and internships under sections 513, 514, and 515 of the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010 (42 U.S.C. 1862p–5; 1862p–6; 1862p–7);

(2)

ensure that not less than 10 percent of the funds made available to carry out this section are used to support additional awards that focus on community college training, education, and teaching programs that increase the participation of populations that are underrepresented in STEM, including technical programs through programs such as the Advanced Technological Education program;

(3)

ensure that not less than 20 percent of the funds made available to carry out this section are used to support institutions of higher education, and other institutions, located in jurisdictions that participate in the program under section 113 of the National Science Foundation Authorization Act of 1988 (42 U.S.C. 1862g); and

(4)

if funds remain after carrying out paragraphs (1), (2), and (3), make awards to institutions of higher education to enable the institutions to fund the development and establishment of new or specialized programs of study for graduate, undergraduate, or technical college students and the evaluation of the effectiveness of those programs of study.

(f)

Existing programs

The Director may use or augment existing STEM education programs of the Foundation and leverage education or entrepreneurial partners to carry out this section.

2107.

Research and development

(a)

In general

From amounts made available for the Directorate, the Director shall make awards, on a competitive basis, for research and technology development within the key technology focus areas.

(b)

Purpose

The purpose of the awards under this section shall be to demonstrate revolutionary technological advances in the key technology focus areas, including advances that expedite short-term technology deployment.

(c)

Recipients

Recipients of funds under this section may include institutions of higher education, research institutions, nonprofit entities, private sector entities, consortia, or other entities as defined by the Director.

(d)

Metrics

The Director may set metrics, including goals and deadlines, for development of such technology as determined in the terms of the award, and may use such metrics to determine whether an award recipient shall be eligible for continued or follow-on funding. The Director shall ensure that the length of the grants for applicants seeking to demonstrate revolutionary technological advances to expedite short-term technology deployment last no longer than 24 months.

(e)

Selection criteria

In selecting recipients for an award under this section, the Director shall consider, at a minimum—

(1)

the relevance of the project to the key technology focus areas;

(2)

the current status of the technology, the limits of current practice, and the likelihood of the private sector to independently demonstrate a similar technological advance;

(3)

the potential of the project to generate a revolutionary technological advance, including advances that can expedite short-term technology deployment;

(4)

the potential impact of the project on the economic security, national security, or technological competitiveness of the United States;

(5)

the likelihood of the project’s success;

(6)

the cost and time associated with the project;

(7)

the appropriateness of quantitative goals and metrics for evaluating the project and a plan for evaluating those metrics; and

(8)

the path for developing and, as appropriate commercializing, the technology.

2108.

Test beds

(a)

Program authorized

(1)

In general

From amounts made available for the Directorate, the Director, in coordination with the Director of the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the Secretary of Energy, and other Federal agencies, as determined appropriate by the Director, shall establish a program in the Directorate to make awards, on a competitive basis, to institutions of higher education, nonprofit organizations, or consortia (as defined in section 2104(a)(7)(C)) to establish and operate test beds, which may include fabrication facilities and cyberinfrastructure, to advance the development, operation, integration, deployment, and, as appropriate, demonstration of new, innovative technologies in the key technology focus areas, which may include hardware or software.

(2)

Coordination

In establishing new test beds under this section, the Director shall ensure coordination with other test beds supported by the Foundation or other Federal agencies to avoid duplication and maximize the use of Federal resources.

(b)

Proposals

An applicant for an award under this section shall submit a proposal to the Director, at such time, in such manner, and containing such information as the Director may reasonably require. The proposal shall, at a minimum, describe—

(1)
(A)

the technology or technologies that will be the focus of the test bed; and

(B)

the goals of the work to be done at the test bed;

(2)

how the applicant will assemble a workforce with the skills needed to operate the test bed;

(3)

how the applicant will ensure broad access to the test bed;

(4)

how the applicant will collaborate with firms in the key technology focus areas, including through coordinated research and development and funding, to ensure that work in the test bed will contribute to the commercial viability of any technologies and will include collaboration from industry and labor organizations;

(5)

how the applicant will encourage the participation of inventors and entrepreneurs and the development of new businesses;

(6)

how the applicant will increase participation by populations that are underrepresented in STEM;

(7)

how the applicant will demonstrate that the commercial viability of any new technologies will support the creation of high-quality domestic jobs;

(8)

how the test bed will operate after Federal funding has ended;

(9)

how the test bed will disseminate lessons and other technical information to United States entities or allied or partner country entities in the United States; and

(10)

how the applicant plans to take measures to prevent the inappropriate use of research results, data, and intellectual property, as applicable and consistent with the requirements of the award.

(c)

Authorized use of funds

A recipient of an award under this section may, in order to achieve the purposes described in subsection (a), use the award for the purchase of equipment and for the support of students, faculty and staff, and postdoctoral researchers.

(d)

Priority

In selecting award recipients under this section, the Director shall give priority to applicants with proposals that maximize the geographic diversity of test beds.

(e)

Interagency annual meetings

The Director, the Secretary of Commerce, the Secretary of Energy, and the heads of other Federal departments and agencies, or their designees, with test bed related equities shall hold an annual meeting to coordinate their respective test bed related investments, future plans, and other appropriate matters, to avoid conflicts and duplication of efforts. Upon request by Congress, Congress shall be briefed on the results of the meetings.

2109.

Academic technology transfer

(a)

In general

From amounts made available to the Directorate, the Director, in coordination with the Director of the National Institute of Standards and Technology and other Federal agencies as determined appropriate by the Director, shall make awards, on a competitive basis, to eligible entities to advance the development and commercialization of technologies, particularly those in the key technology focus areas.

(b)

Eligible entities

To be eligible to receive an award under this section, an entity shall be—

(1)

an institution of higher education, which may be a community college;

(2)

a nonprofit entity that is either affiliated with an institution of higher education or designed to support technology development or entrepreneurship; or

(3)

a consortium that includes—

(A)

an entity described in paragraph (1) or (2) as the lead award recipient; and

(B)

one or more additional individuals or entities, which shall be—

(i)

an economic development organization or similar entity that is focused primarily on improving science, technology, innovation, or entrepreneurship;

(ii)

an industry organization or firm in a relevant technology or innovation sector;

(iii)

an industry-experienced executive with entrepreneurship experience that is focused primarily on de-risking technologies from both a scientific and a business perspective; or

(iv)

an individual or entity with industry- and startup- experienced business expertise, including a mentor network, across relevant technology or innovation sectors.

(c)

Proposals

An eligible entity desiring an award under this section shall submit a proposal to the Director at such time, in such manner, and containing such information as the Director may require. The proposal shall include, at a minimum, a description of—

(1)

the steps the applicant will take to enable technology transfer and to reduce the risks for commercialization for new technologies and why such steps are likely to be effective;

(2)

how the applicant will encourage the training and participation of students and potential entrepreneurs and the transition of research results to practice, including the development of new businesses;

(3)

as relevant, potential steps to drive economic growth in a particular region, by collaborating with industry, venture capital entities, nonprofit entities, and State and local governments within that region; and

(4)

background information that the Director determines is relevant to demonstrate the success of the innovation and entrepreneurship support models proposed by the applicant to commercialize technologies.

(d)

Academic technology transfer enhancement program

(1)

In general

The Director, in coordination with the Director of the National Institute of Standards and Technology, shall make awards, on a competitive basis, to support eligible entities in building sustainable technology transfer capacity.

(2)

Use of funds

An eligible entity that receives an award under this subsection shall use award funds to carry out one or more of the following:

(A)

Identifying academic research with the potential for technology transfer and commercialization, particularly as relevant to the key technology focus areas.

(B)

Providing training and support to scientists, engineers, and inventors on technology transfer, commercialization, and research protection.

(C)

Offsetting the costs of patenting and licensing research products, both domestically and internationally.

(D)

Revising institution policies, including policies related to intellectual property and faculty entrepreneurship, and taking other necessary steps to implement relevant best practices for academic technology transfer.

(E)

Ensuring the availability of staff, including technology transfer professionals, entrepreneurs in residence, and other mentors as required to accomplish the purpose of this subsection.

(F)

Identifying and facilitating relationships among local and national business leaders, including investors, and potential entrepreneurs to encourage successful commercialization.

(G)

Creating and funding competitions to allow entrepreneurial ideas to illustrate their commercialization potential, including through venture funds of institutions of higher education.

(H)

Creating or supporting entities that could enable researchers to further develop new technology, through capital investment, advice, staff support, or other means.

(I)

Building technology transfer capacity at institutions of higher education.

(3)

Limitations on funding

In awarding funding under this subsection, the Director shall—

(A)

award not more than $1,000,000 per fiscal year to an eligible entity;

(B)

in determining the duration of funding, endeavor to ensure the creation of sustainable technology transfer practices at the eligible entity; and

(C)

ensure that grants under this subsection shall not support the development or operation of capital investment funds.

(e)

Collaborative innovation resource center program

(1)

In general

The Director shall make awards under this subsection to eligible entities to establish collaborative innovation resource centers that promote regional technology transfer and technology development activities available to more than one institution of higher education and to other entities in a region.

(2)

Collaboration priority

In making awards under this subsection, the Director shall give priority to eligible entities that are consortia described in subsection (b)(3) and that have a cost share, which may include an in-kind cost share, from members of a consortium, at levels as required by the Director.

(3)

Use of funds

An eligible entity that receives an award under this subsection shall use award funds to carry out one or more of the following activities, to the benefit of the region in which the center is located:

(A)

Providing start-ups and small business concerns (as defined in section 3 of the Small Business Act (15 U.S.C. 632)) within the region with access to facilities, scientific infrastructure, personnel, and other assets as required for technology maturation.

(B)

Supporting entrepreneurial training for start-up and small business personnel.

(C)

Providing engineering and entrepreneurial experiences and hands-on training for students enrolled in participating institutions of higher education.

(f)

Reporting on commercialization based on metrics

The Director shall establish—

(1)

metrics related to commercialization for an award under this section; and

(2)

a reporting schedule for recipients of such awards that takes into account both short- and long-term goals of the programs under this section.

(g)

Geographic diversity

The Director shall ensure regional and geographic diversity in issuing awards under this section.

(h)

Supplement not supplant

The Director shall ensure that funds made available under this section shall be used to create additional support for technology transfer activities at eligible entities. For the duration of the awards, recipients shall be required to maintain funding for such activities at similar levels as the funding for those activities for the 2 fiscal years preceding the award.

2110.

Capacity-building program for developing universities

(a)

In general

The Director shall establish a program in the Directorate to make awards, on a competitive basis, to eligible institutions described in subsection (b) to support the mission of the Directorate and to build institutional research capacity at eligible institutions.

(b)

Eligible institution

(1)

In general

To be eligible to receive an award under this section, an institution—

(A)

shall be—

(i)

a historically Black college or university;

(ii)

a minority-serving institution; or

(iii)

an institution of higher education with an established STEM capacity building program focused on traditionally underrepresented populations in STEM, including Native Hawaiians, Alaska Natives, and Indians; and

(B)

shall have not more than $50,000,000 in annual federally-financed research and development expenditures for science and engineering as reported through the National Science Foundation Higher Education Research and Development Survey.

(2)

Partnerships

An eligible institution receiving a grant under this section may carry out the activities of the grant through a partnership with other entities, including other eligible institutions.

(c)

Proposals

To receive an award under this section, an eligible institution shall submit an application to the Director at such time, in such manner, and containing such information as the Director may require, including a plan that describes how the eligible institution will establish or expand research office capacity and how such award would be used to—

(1)

conduct an assessment of capacity-building and research infrastructure needs of an eligible institution;

(2)

enhance institutional resources to provide administrative research development support to faculty at an eligible institution;

(3)

bolster the institutional research competitiveness of an eligible institution to support grants awarded by the Directorate;

(4)

support the acquisition of instrumentation necessary to build research capacity at an eligible institution in research areas directly associated with the Directorate;

(5)

increase capability of an eligible institution to move technology into the marketplace;

(6)

increase engagement with industry to execute research through the SBIR and STTR programs (as defined in section 9(e) of the Small Business Act (15 U.S.C. 638(e)) and direct contracts at an eligible institution;

(7)

provide student engagement and research training opportunities at the undergraduate, graduate, and postdoctoral levels at an eligible institution;

(8)

further faculty development initiatives and strengthen institutional research training infrastructure, capacity, and competitiveness of an eligible institution; or

(9)

address plans and prospects for long-term sustainability of institutional enhancements at an eligible institution resulting from the award including, if applicable, how the award may be leveraged by an eligible institution to build a broader base of support.

(d)

Awards

Awards made under this section shall be for periods of 3 years, and may be extended for periods of not more than 5 years.

(e)

Funding

From the amounts made available to carry out section 2104 under section 2116 for each of fiscal years 2022 through 2026, the Director shall use $150,000,000 for each such fiscal year to carry out this section.

2111.

Technical assistance

The Director may—

(1)

coordinate with other Federal agencies to establish interagency and multidisciplinary teams to provide technical assistance to recipients of, and prospective applicants for, awards under this title;

(2)

by Federal interagency agreement and notwithstanding any other provision of law, transfer funds available to carry out this title to the head of another Federal agency to facilitate and support the provision of such technical assistance; and

(3)

enter into contracts with third parties to provide such technical assistance.

2112.

Coordination of activities

(a)

In general

In carrying out the activities of the Directorate, the Director shall coordinate and work cooperatively with the Secretary of Energy, the Director of the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and the heads of other Federal research agencies, as appropriate, to further the goals of this title in the key technology focus areas.

(b)

Avoid duplication

The Director shall ensure, to the greatest extent practicable, that activities carried out by the Directorate are not duplicative of activities supported by other parts of the Foundation or other relevant Federal agencies. In carrying out the activities prescribed by this division, the Director shall coordinate with the Interagency Working Group and heads of other Federal research agencies to ensure these activities enhance and complement, but do not constitute unnecessary duplication of effort and to ensure the responsible stewardship of funds.

(c)

Comptroller general report

Not later than 3 years after the date of enactment of this division, the Comptroller General of the United States shall prepare and submit a report to Congress, and shall simultaneously submit the report to the Director, the Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy, and the Secretary of Energy describing the interagency cooperation that occurred during the preceding years pursuant to this section, including a list of—

(1)

any funds provided from the Directorate to other directorates and offices of the Foundation; and

(2)

any instances in which unnecessary duplication of effort may have occurred.

2113.

Reporting requirements

(a)

Reports

Not later than 1 year after the date of enactment of this division and annually thereafter, the Director, in coordination with the heads of relevant Federal agencies, shall prepare and submit to Congress—

(1)

a strategic vision and spending plan for the next 5 years for the Directorate, including a description of how the Foundation will increase funding for research and education for populations underrepresented in STEM and geographic areas;

(2)

in coordination with the Secretary of State, a description of any funds the Foundation may plan to receive from—

(A)

entities other than institutions of higher education; and

(B)

certain designated countries; and

(3)

a description of the planned activities of the Directorate to secure federally funded science and technology pursuant to section 1746 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116–92; 42 U.S.C. 6601 note) and section 223 of William M. (Mac) Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021 (Public Law 116–283) and the requirements under title III.

(b)

Annual briefing

Each year, the Director and the Secretary of Energy shall formally request a joint briefing from the Secretary of Defense, the Secretary of Commerce, the Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Director of National Intelligence, and as appropriate the heads of other Federal agencies regarding their efforts to preserve the United States’ advantages generated by the activity of the Directorate.

(c)

Providing authority To disseminate information

Section 11 of the National Science Foundation Act of 1950 (42 U.S.C. 1870) is amended—

(1)

in subsection (j), by striking and after the semicolon;

(2)

in subsection (k), by striking the period at the end and inserting ; and; and

(3)

by adding at the end the following:

(l)

to provide for the widest practicable and appropriate dissemination of information within the United States concerning the Foundation’s activities and the results of those activities.

.

2114.

Hands-on learning program

(a)

Findings

Congress finds the following:

(1)

Developing a robust, talented, and homegrown workforce, particularly in the fields of STEM, is critical to the success of the United States innovation economy.

(2)

The United States educational system is not producing a sufficient number of workers with the necessary STEM expertise to meet the needs of the United States industry in STEM fields.

(3)

Hands-on and experiential learning opportunities outside of the classroom are critical for student success in STEM subjects and careers, stimulating students’ interest, increasing confidence, and creating motivation to pursue a related career.

(4)

Hands-on and experiential learning opportunities can be particularly successful in inspiring interest in students who traditionally have been underrepresented in STEM fields, including girls, students of color, and students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

(5)

An expansion of hands-on and experiential learning programs across the United States would expand the STEM workforce pipeline, developing and training students for careers in STEM fields.

(b)

Definitions

(1)

ESEA terms

The terms elementary school, high school, secondary school, and State have the meanings given the terms in section 8101 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 7801).

(2)

Eligible nonprofit program

The term eligible nonprofit program

(A)

means a nonprofit program serving prekindergarten, elementary school, or secondary school students; and

(B)

includes a program described in subparagraph (A) that covers the continuum of education from prekindergarten through high school and is available in every State.

(c)

Purposes

The purposes of this section are to—

(1)

provide effective, compelling, and engaging means for teaching and reinforcing fundamental STEM concepts and inspiring the youth of the United States to pursue careers in STEM-related fields;

(2)

expand the STEM workforce pipeline by developing and training students for careers in United States STEM fields; and

(3)

broaden participation in the STEM workforce by underrepresented population groups.

(d)

Program authorized

(1)

In general

Subject to the availability of appropriations for such purposes, the Director shall—

(A)

provide grants to eligible nonprofit programs for supporting hands-on learning opportunities in STEM education, including via after-school activities and innovative learning opportunities such as robotics competitions; and

(B)

evaluate the impact of such hands-on learning opportunities on STEM learning and disseminate the results of that evaluation.

(2)

Priority

In awarding grants under the program, the Director shall give priority to eligible nonprofit programs serving students that attend elementary, secondary, or high schools that—

(A)

are implementing comprehensive support and improvement activities or targeted support and improvement activities under paragraph (1) or (2) of section 1111(d) of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 6311(d)); or

(B)

serve high percentages of students who are eligible for a free or reduced price lunch under the Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act (42 U.S.C. 1751 et seq.) (which, in the case of a high school, may be calculated using comparable data from the schools that feed into the high school).

(e)

Authorization of appropriations

From the amounts made available to carry out section 2106 under section 2116 for each of fiscal years 2022 through 2026, the Director shall use $25,000,000 for each such fiscal year to carry out this section.

2115.

Intellectual property protection

Consistent with the requirements for the award, all intellectual property that is developed through the Foundation, or any program that has received funding through this division (or an amendment made by this division), shall not be transferred to—

(1)

any foreign entity of concern, as defined in section 2307(a);

(2)

any United States subsidiary, division, or chapter of such a foreign entity of concern; or

(3)

any for-profit, or nonprofit, partnership that includes such a foreign entity of concern in the partnership.

2116.

Authorization of appropriations for the Foundation

(a)

Fiscal year 2022

(1)

Foundation

There is authorized to be appropriated to the Foundation $10,800,000,000 for fiscal year 2022.

(2)

Specific NSF allocations

Of the amount authorized under paragraph (1)—

(A)

$9,000,000,000 shall be made available to carry out the activities of the Foundation outside of the Directorate, of which $1,000,000,000 shall be for STEM education and related activities, including workforce activities under section 2202; and

(B)

$1,800,000,000 shall be made available to the Directorate, of which—

(i)

$594,000,000 shall be for the innovation centers under section 2104;

(ii)

$324,000,000 shall be for scholarships, fellowships, and other activities under section 2106;

(iii)

$252,000,000 shall be for academic technology transfer under section 2109;

(iv)

$180,000,000 shall be for test beds under section 2108;

(v)

$270,000,000 shall be for research and development activities under section 2107; and

(vi)

an amount equal to 10 percent of the total made available to the Directorate under this subparagraph shall be transferred to the Foundation for collaboration with directorates and offices of the Foundation outside of the Directorate as described under section 2102(c)(7).

(b)

Fiscal year 2023

(1)

Foundation

There is authorized to be appropriated to the Foundation $12,800,000,000 for fiscal year 2023.

(2)

Specific NSF allocations

Of the amount authorized under paragraph (1)—

(A)

$9,600,000,000 shall be made available to carry out the activities of the Foundation outside of the Directorate, of which $1,190,000,000 shall be for STEM education and related activities, including workforce activities under section 2202; and

(B)

$3,200,000,000 shall be made available to the Directorate, of which—

(i)

$1,056,000,000 shall be for the innovation centers under section 2104;

(ii)

$576,000,000 shall be for scholarships, fellowships, and other activities under section 2106;

(iii)

$448,000,000 shall be for academic technology transfer under section 2109;

(iv)

$320,000,000 shall be for test beds under section 2108;

(v)

$480,000,000 shall be for research and development activities under section 2107; and

(vi)

an amount equal to 10 percent of the total made available to the Directorate under this subparagraph shall be transferred to the Foundation for collaboration with directorates and offices of the Foundation outside of the Directorate as described under section 2102(c)(7).

(c)

Fiscal year 2024

(1)

Foundation

There is authorized to be appropriated to the Foundation $16,600,000,000 for fiscal year 2024.

(2)

Specific NSF allocations

Of the amount authorized under paragraph (1)—

(A)

$10,300,000,000 shall be made available to carry out the activities of the Foundation outside of the Directorate, of which $1,600,000,000 shall be for STEM education and related activities, including workforce activities under section 2202; and

(B)

$6,300,000,000 shall be made available to the Directorate, of which—

(i)

$2,079,000,000 shall be for the innovation centers under section 2104;

(ii)

$1,134,000,000 shall be for scholarships, fellowships, and other activities under section 2106;

(iii)

$882,000,000 shall be for academic technology transfer under section 2109;

(iv)

$630,000,000 shall be for test beds under section 2108;

(v)

$945,000,000 shall be for research and development activities under section 2107; and

(vi)

an amount equal to 10 percent of the total made available to the Directorate under this subparagraph shall be transferred to the Foundation for collaboration with directorates and offices of the Foundation outside of the Directorate as described under section 2102(c)(7).

(d)

Fiscal year 2025

(1)

Foundation

There is authorized to be appropriated to the Foundation $19,500,000,000 for fiscal year 2025.

(2)

Specific NSF allocations

Of the amount authorized under paragraph (1)—

(A)

$11,100,000,000 shall be made available to carry out the activities of the Foundation outside of the Directorate, of which $2,100,000,000 shall be for STEM education and related activities, including workforce activities under section 2202; and

(B)

$8,400,000,000 shall be made available to the Directorate, of which—

(i)

$2,772,000,000 shall be for the innovation centers under section 2104;

(ii)

$1,512,000,000 shall be for scholarships, fellowships, and other activities under section 2106;

(iii)

$1,176,000,000 shall be for academic technology transfer under section 2109;

(iv)

$840,000,000 shall be for test beds under section 2108;

(v)

$1,260,000,000 shall be for research and development activities under section 2107; and

(vi)

an amount equal to 10 percent of the total made available to the Directorate under this subparagraph shall be transferred to the Foundation for collaboration with directorates and offices of the Foundation outside of the Directorate as described under section 2102(c)(7).

(e)

Fiscal year 2026

(1)

Foundation

There is authorized to be appropriated to the Foundation $21,300,000,000 for fiscal year 2026.

(2)

Specific NSF allocations

Of the amount authorized under paragraph (1)—

(A)

$12,000,000,000 shall be made available to carry out the activities of the Foundation outside of the Directorate, of which $2,540,000,000 shall be for STEM education and related activities, including workforce activities under section 2202; and

(B)

$9,300,000,000 shall be made available to the Directorate, of which—

(i)

$3,069,000,000 shall be for the innovation centers under section 2104;

(ii)

$1,674,000,000 shall be for scholarships, fellowships, and other activities under section 2106;

(iii)

$1,302,000,000 shall be for academic technology transfer under section 2109;

(iv)

$930,000,000 shall be for test beds under section 2108;

(v)

$1,395,000,000 shall be for research and development activities under section 2107; and

(vi)

an amount equal to 10 percent of the total made available to the Directorate under this subparagraph shall be transferred to the Foundation for collaboration with directorates and offices of the Foundation outside of the Directorate as described under section 2102(c)(7).

(f)

Allocation and limitations

(1)

Allocation for the office of inspector general

From any amounts appropriated for the Foundation for a fiscal year, the Director shall allocate for necessary expenses of the Office of Inspector General of the Foundation an amount of not less than $33,000,000 in any fiscal year for oversight of the programs and activities funded under this section in accordance with the Inspector General Act of 1978 (5 U.S.C. App.).

(2)

Supplement and not supplant

The amounts authorized to be appropriated under this section shall supplement, and not supplant, any other amounts previously appropriated to the Office of the Inspector General of the Foundation.

(3)

No new awards

The Director shall not make any new awards for the activities under the Directorate for any fiscal year in which the total amount appropriated to the Foundation (not including amounts appropriated for the Directorate) is less than the total amount appropriated to the Foundation (not including such amounts), adjusted by the rate of inflation, for the previous fiscal year.

(4)

No funds for construction

No funds provided to the Directorate under this section shall be used for construction.

2117.

Authorization of appropriations for the Department of Energy

(a)

Authorization of appropriations

(1)

Fiscal year 2022

There is authorized to be appropriated to the Department of Energy $1,000,000,000 for fiscal year 2022 to carry out research and development and address energy-related supply chain activities within the key technology focus areas.

(2)

Fiscal year 2023

There is authorized to be appropriated to the Department of Energy $1,800,000,000 for fiscal year 2023 to carry out research and development and address energy-related supply chain activities within the key technology focus areas.

(3)

Fiscal year 2024

There is authorized to be appropriated to the Department of Energy $3,700,000,000 for fiscal year 2024 to carry out research and development and address energy-related supply chain activities within the key technology focus areas.

(4)

Fiscal year 2025

There is authorized to be appropriated to the Department of Energy $4,900,000,000 for fiscal year 2025 to carry out research and development and address energy-related supply chain activities within the key technology focus areas.

(5)

Fiscal year 2026

There is authorized to be appropriated to the Department of Energy $5,500,000,000 for fiscal year 2026 to carry out research and development and address energy-related supply chain activities within the key technology focus areas.

(b)

Supplement and not supplant

The amounts authorized to be appropriated under this section shall supplement, and not supplant, any other amounts previously authorized to be appropriated to the Department of Energy.

(c)

No funds for construction

No funds provided to the Department of Energy under this section shall be used for construction.

2118.

Authorization of appropriations for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

(a)

In general

Notwithstanding any other provision of law, there is authorized to be appropriated for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency to conduct research and development in key technology focus areas $3,500,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2022 through 2026.

(b)

Supplement, not supplant

Any amount appropriated pursuant to the authorization in subsection (a) shall supplement and not supplant any amounts already appropriated for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.

II

NSF research, STEM, and geographic diversity initiatives

2201.

Chief Diversity Officer of the NSF

(a)

Chief diversity officer

(1)

Appointment

The President shall appoint, by and with the consent of the Senate, a Chief Diversity Officer of the Foundation.

(2)

Qualifications

The Chief Diversity Officer shall have significant experience, within the Federal Government and the science community, with diversity- and inclusion-related matters, including—

(A)

civil rights compliance;

(B)

harassment policy, reviews, and investigations;

(C)

equal employment opportunity; and

(D)

disability policy.

(3)

Oversight

The Chief Diversity Officer shall direct the Office of Diversity and Inclusion of the Foundation and report directly to the Director in the performance of the duties of the Chief Diversity Officer under this section.

(b)

Duties

The Chief Diversity Officer is responsible for providing advice on policy, oversight, guidance, and coordination with respect to matters of the Foundation related to diversity and inclusion, including ensuring the geographic diversity of the Foundation programs. Other duties may include—

(1)

establishing and maintaining a strategic plan that publicly states a diversity definition, vision, and goals for the Foundation;

(2)

defining a set of strategic metrics that are—

(A)

directly linked to key organizational priorities and goals;

(B)

actionable; and

(C)

actively used to implement the strategic plan under paragraph (1);

(3)

advising in the establishment of a strategic plan for diverse participation by individuals and institutions of higher education, including community colleges, historically Black colleges and universities, Tribal colleges or universities, minority-serving institutions, institutions of higher education with an established STEM capacity building program focused on traditionally underrepresented populations in STEM, including Native Hawaiians, Alaska Natives, and Indians, and institutions from jurisdictions eligible to participate under section 113 of the National Science Foundation Authorization Act of 1988 (42 U.S.C. 1862g);

(4)

advising in the establishment of a strategic plan for outreach to, and recruiting from, untapped locations and underrepresented populations;

(5)

advising on the application of the Foundation's broader impacts review criterion; and

(6)

performing such additional duties and exercise such powers as the Director may prescribe.

(c)

Funding

From any amounts appropriated for the Foundation for each of fiscal years 2022 through 2026, the Director shall allocate $5,000,000 to carry out this section for each such year.

2202.

Programs to address the STEM workforce

(a)

In general

The Director shall issue undergraduate scholarships, including at community colleges, graduate fellowships and traineeships, postdoctoral awards, and, as appropriate, other awards.

(b)

Implementation

The Director may carry out subsection (a) by making awards—

(1)

directly to students; or

(2)

to institutions of higher education or consortia of institutions of higher education, including those institutions or consortia involved in operating university technology centers established under section 2104(a).

(c)

Broadening participation

In carrying out this section, the Director shall take steps to increase the participation of populations that are underrepresented in STEM, which may include—

(1)

establishing or augmenting programs targeted at populations that are underrepresented in STEM;

(2)

supporting traineeships or other relevant programs at minority-serving institutions (or institutions of higher education with an established STEM capacity building program focused on traditionally underrepresented populations in STEM, including Native Hawaiians, Alaska Natives, and Indians);

(3)

addressing current and expected gaps in the availability and skills of the STEM workforce, or addressing the needs of the STEM workforce, including by prioritizing awards to United States citizens, permanent residents, and individuals that will grow the domestic workforce;

(4)

addressing geographic diversity in the STEM workforce; and

(5)

awarding grants to institutions of higher education to address STEM workforce gaps, including for programs that recruit, retain, and progress students to a bachelor’s degree in a STEM discipline concurrent with a secondary school diploma, such as through existing and new partnerships with State educational agencies.

(d)

Innovation

(1)

Graduate education

In carrying out this section, the Director shall encourage innovation in graduate education, and studying the impacts of such innovations, including through encouraging institutions of higher education to offer graduate students opportunities to gain experience in industry or government as part of their graduate training, and through support for students in professional masters programs related to the key technology focus areas.

(2)

Postdoctoral professional development

In carrying out this section, the Director shall encourage innovation in postdoctoral professional development, support the development and diversity of the STEM workforce, and study the impacts of such innovation and support. To do so, the Director may use postdoctoral awards established under subsection (a) or leveraged under subsection (e)(1) for fellowships or other temporary rotational postings of not more than 2 years. Such fellowships or temporary rotational postings shall be awarded—

(A)

to qualified individuals who have a doctoral degree and received such degree not earlier than 5 years before the date that the fellowship or temporary rotational posting begins; and

(B)

to carry out research in the key technology focus areas at Federal, State, local, and Tribal government research facilities.

(3)

Direct hire authority

(A)

In general

During fiscal year 2021 and any fiscal year thereafter, the head of any Federal agency may appoint, without regard to the provisions of subchapter I of chapter 33 of title 5, United States Code, other than sections 3303 and 3328 of that title, a qualified candidate described in subparagraph (B) directly to a position in the competitive service with the Federal agency for which the candidate meets Office of Personnel Management qualification standards.

(B)

Fellowship or temporary rotational posting

Subparagraph (A) applies with respect to a former recipient of an award under this subsection who—

(i)

earned a doctoral degree in a STEM field from an institution of higher education; and

(ii)

successfully fulfilled the requirements of the fellowship or temporary rotational posting within a Federal agency.

(C)

Limitation

The direct hire authority under this paragraph shall be exercised with respect to a specific qualified candidate not later than 2 years after the date that the candidate completed the requirements related to the fellowship or temporary rotational posting described under this subsection.

(e)

Existing programs

In carrying out this section, the Director may leverage existing programs, including programs that issue—

(1)

postdoctoral awards;

(2)

graduate fellowships and traineeships, inclusive of the NSF Research Traineeships and fellowships awarded under the Graduate Research Fellowship Program; and

(3)

scholarships, research experiences, and internships, including—

(A)

scholarships to attend community colleges; and

(B)

research experiences and internships under sections 513, 514, and 515 of the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010 (42 U.S.C. 1862p–5; 1862p–6; 42 U.S.C. 1862p–7); and

(4)

awards to institutions of higher education to enable the institutions to fund innovation in undergraduate and graduate education, increased educational capacity, and the development and establishment of new or specialized programs of study for graduate, undergraduate, or technical college students, and the evaluation of the effectiveness of the programs of study.

(f)

Set aside

The Director shall ensure that not less than 20 percent of the funds available to carry out this section shall be used to support institutions of higher education, and other institutions, located in jurisdictions that participate in the program under section 113 of the National Science Foundation Authorization Act of 1988 (42 U.S.C. 1862g).

2203.

Emerging research institution pilot program

(a)

In general

The Director shall establish a 5-year pilot program for awarding grants to eligible partnerships, led by 1 or more emerging research institutions, to build research and education capacity at emerging research institutions to enable such institutions to contribute to programs run by the Directorate.

(b)

Applications

An eligible partnership seeking a grant under this section shall submit an application to the Director at such time, in such manner, and containing such information as the Director may reasonably require, including a statement of how the partnership will use the funds awarded through the grant to achieve a lasting, sustainable increase in the research and education capacity of each emerging research institution included in the eligible partnership.

(c)

Activities

An eligible partnership receiving a grant under this section may use the funds awarded through such grant for increasing research, education, and innovation capacity, including for—

(1)

faculty training and resources, including joint resources;

(2)

research experiences for undergraduate and graduate students; and

(3)

maintenance and repair of research equipment and instrumentation.

(d)

Definition of eligible partnership

In this section, the term eligible partnership means a partnership of—

(1)

at least 1 emerging research institution; and

(2)

at least 1 institution that, on average for the 3 years prior to an application for an award under this section, received more than $100,000,000 in Federal research funding.

2204.

Personnel management authorities for the Foundation

(a)

Experts in science and engineering

(1)

Program authorized

The Foundation may carry out a program of personnel management authority provided under paragraph (2) in order to facilitate recruitment of eminent experts in science or engineering for research and development projects and to enhance the administration and management of the Foundation.

(2)

Personnel management authority

Under the program under paragraph (1), the Foundation may—

(A)

without regard to any provision of title 5, United States Code, governing the appointment of employees in the civil service, appoint individuals to a total of not more than 140 positions in the Foundation, of which not more than 5 such positions may be positions of administration or management of the Foundation;

(B)

notwithstanding any provision of title 5, United States Code, governing the rates of pay or classification of employees in the executive branch, prescribe the rates of basic pay for positions to which employees are appointed under subparagraph (A)—

(i)

in the case of employees appointed pursuant to subparagraph (A) to any of 5 positions designated by the Foundation for purposes of this clause, at rates not in excess of a rate equal to 150 percent of the maximum rate of basic pay authorized for positions at level I of the Executive Schedule under section 5312 of title 5, United States Code; and

(ii)

in the case of any other employee appointed pursuant to subparagraph (A), at rates not in excess of the maximum rate of basic pay authorized for senior-level positions under section 5376 of title 5, United States Code; and

(C)

pay any employee appointed under subparagraph (A), other than an employee appointed to a position designated as described in subparagraph (B)(i), payments in addition to basic pay within the limit applicable to the employee under paragraph (4).

(3)

Limitation on term of appointment

(A)

In general

Except as provided in subparagraph (B), the service of an employee under an appointment under paragraph (2)(A) may not exceed 4 years.

(B)

Extension

The Director may, in the case of a particular employee under the program under paragraph (1), extend the period to which service is limited under subparagraph (A) by up to 2 years if the Director determines that such action is necessary to promote the efficiency of the Foundation, as applicable.

(4)

Maximum amount of additional payments payable

Notwithstanding any other provision of this subsection or section 5307 of title 5, United States Code, no additional payments may be paid to an employee under paragraph (2)(C) in any calendar year if, or to the extent that, the employee’s total annual compensation in such calendar year will exceed the maximum amount of total annual compensation payable at the salary set in accordance with section 104 of title 3, United States Code.

(b)

Highly qualified experts in needed occupations

(1)

In general

The Foundation may carry out a program using the authority provided in paragraph (2) in order to attract highly qualified experts in needed occupations, as determined by the Foundation. Individuals hired by the Director through such authority may include individuals with expertise in business creativity, innovation management, design thinking, entrepreneurship, venture capital, and related fields.

(2)

Authority

Under the program, the Foundation may—

(A)

appoint personnel from outside the civil service and uniformed services (as such terms are defined in section 2101 of title 5, United States Code) to positions in the Foundation without regard to any provision of title 5, United States Code, governing the appointment of employees to positions in the Foundation;

(B)

prescribe the rates of basic pay for positions to which employees are appointed under subparagraph (A) at rates not in excess of the maximum rate of basic pay authorized for senior-level positions under section 5376 of title 5, United States Code, as increased by locality-based comparability payments under section 5304 of such title, notwithstanding any provision of such title governing the rates of pay or classification of employees in the executive branch; and

(C)

pay any employee appointed under subparagraph (A) payments in addition to basic pay within the limits applicable to the employee under paragraph (4).

(3)

Limitation on term of appointment

(A)

In general

Except as provided in subparagraph (B), the service of an employee under an appointment made pursuant to this subsection may not exceed 5 years.

(B)

Extension

The Foundation may, in the case of a particular employee, extend the period to which service is limited under subparagraph (A) by up to 1 additional year if the Foundation determines that such action is necessary to promote the Foundation’s national security missions.

(4)

Limitations on additional payments

(A)

Total amount

(i)

In general

The total amount of the additional payments paid to an employee under this subsection for any 12-month period may not exceed the lesser of the following amounts:

(I)

$50,000 in fiscal year 2021, which may be adjusted annually thereafter by the Foundation, with a percentage increase equal to one-half of 1 percentage point less than the percentage by which the Employment Cost Index, published quarterly by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, for the base quarter of the year before the preceding calendar year exceeds the Employment Cost Index for the base quarter of the second year before the preceding calendar year.

(II)

The amount equal to 50 percent of the employee’s annual rate of basic pay.

(ii)

Definition of base quarter

For purposes of this subparagraph, the term base quarter has the meaning given such term by section 5302(3) of title 5, United States Code.

(B)

Eligibility for payments

An employee appointed under this subsection is not eligible for any bonus, monetary award, or other monetary incentive for service, except for payments authorized under this subsection.

(C)

Additional limitation

Notwithstanding any other provision of this paragraph or of section 5307 of title 5, United States Code, no additional payments may be paid to an employee under this subsection in any calendar year if, or to the extent that, the employee’s total annual compensation will exceed the maximum amount of total annual compensation payable at the salary set in accordance with section 104 of title 3, United States Code.

(5)

Limitation on number of highly qualified experts

The number of highly qualified experts appointed and retained by the Foundation under paragraph (2)(A) shall not exceed 140 at any time.

(6)

Savings provisions

In the event that the Foundation terminates the program under this subsection, in the case of an employee who, on the day before the termination of the program, is serving in a position pursuant to an appointment under this subsection—

(A)

the termination of the program does not terminate the employee’s employment in that position before the expiration of the lesser of—

(i)

the period for which the employee was appointed; or

(ii)

the period to which the employee’s service is limited under paragraph (3), including any extension made under this subsection before the termination of the program; and

(B)

the rate of basic pay prescribed for the position under this subsection may not be reduced as long as the employee continues to serve in the position without a break in service.

(c)

Additional hiring authority

To the extent needed to carry out the duties under subsection (a)(1), the Director is authorized to utilize hiring authorities under section 3372 of title 5, United States Code, to staff the Foundation with employees from other Federal agencies, State and local governments, Indian Tribes and Tribal organizations, institutions of higher education, and other organizations, as described in that section, in the same manner and subject to the same conditions, that apply to such individuals utilized to accomplish other missions of the Foundation.

(d)

National Academy of Public Administration

(1)

Study

Not later than 30 days after the date of enactment of this division, the Director shall contract with the National Academy of Public Administration to conduct a study on the organizational and management structure of the Foundation, to—

(A)

evaluate and make recommendations to efficiently and effectively implement the Directorate for Technology and Innovation;

(B)

evaluate and make recommendations to ensure coordination of the Directorate for Technology and Innovation with other directorates and offices of the Foundation and other Federal agencies; and

(C)

make recommendations for the management of the Foundation’s business and personnel practices, including implementation of the new hiring authorities and program director authorities provided in this section and section 2103.

(2)

Review

Upon completion of the study under paragraph (1), the Foundation shall review the recommendations from the National Academy of Public Administration and provide a briefing to Congress on the plans of the Foundation to implement any such recommendations.

2205.

Advanced Technological Manufacturing Act

(a)

Findings and purpose

Section 2 of the Scientific and Advanced-Technology Act of 1992 (42 U.S.C. 1862h) is amended—

(1)

in subsection (a)—

(A)

in paragraph (3), by striking science, mathematics, and technology and inserting science, technology, engineering, and mathematics or STEM;

(B)

in paragraph (4), by inserting educated and before trained; and

(C)

in paragraph (5), by striking scientific and technical education and training and inserting STEM education and training; and

(2)

in subsection (b)—

(A)

in paragraph (2), by striking mathematics and science and inserting STEM fields; and

(B)

in paragraph (4), by striking mathematics and science instruction and inserting STEM instruction.

(b)

Modernizing references to STEM

Section 3 of the Scientific and Advanced-Technology Act of 1992 (42 U.S.C. 1862i) is amended—

(1)

in the section heading, by striking scientific and technical education and inserting stem education;

(2)

in subsection (a)—

(A)

in the subsection heading, by striking Scientific and technical education and inserting STEM education;

(B)

in the matter preceding paragraph (1)—

(i)

by inserting and education to prepare the skilled technical workforce to meet workforce demands before , and to improve;

(ii)

by striking core education courses in science and mathematics and inserting core education courses in STEM fields;

(iii)

by inserting veterans and individuals engaged in before work in the home; and

(iv)

by inserting and on building a pathway from secondary schools, to associate-degree-granting institutions, to careers that require technical training before , and shall be designed;

(C)

in paragraph (1)—

(i)

by inserting and study after development; and

(ii)

by striking core science and mathematics courses and inserting core STEM courses;

(D)

in paragraph (2), by striking science, mathematics, and advanced-technology fields and inserting STEM and advanced-technology fields;

(E)

in paragraph (3)(A), by inserting to support the advanced-technology industries that drive the competitiveness of the United States in the global economy before the semicolon at the end;

(F)

in paragraph (4), by striking scientific and advanced-technology fields and inserting STEM and advanced-technology fields; and

(G)

in paragraph (5), by striking advanced scientific and technical education and inserting advanced STEM and advanced-technology;

(3)

in subsection (b)—

(A)

by striking the subsection heading and inserting the following: Centers of scientific and technical education.—;

(B)

in the matter preceding paragraph (1), by striking not to exceed 12 in number and inserting in advanced-technology fields;

(C)

in paragraph (2), by striking education in mathematics and science and inserting STEM education; and

(D)

in the flush matter following paragraph (2), by striking in the geographic region served by the center;

(4)

in subsection (c)—

(A)

in paragraph (1)—

(i)

in subparagraph (A)—

(I)

in the matter preceding clause (i), by striking to encourage and all that follows through such means as— and inserting to encourage the development of career and educational pathways with multiple entry and exit points leading to credentials and degrees, and to assist students pursuing pathways in STEM fields to transition from associate-degree-granting colleges to bachelor-degree-granting institutions, through such means as—;

(II)

in clause (i), by striking to ensure and inserting to develop articulation agreements that ensure; and

(III)

in clause (ii), by striking courses at the bachelor-degree-granting institution and inserting the career and educational pathways supported by the articulation agreements;

(ii)

in subparagraph (B)—

(I)

in clause (i), by inserting veterans and individuals engaged in before work in the home;

(II)

in clause (iii)—

(aa)

by striking bachelor’s-degree-granting institutions and inserting institutions or work sites; and

(bb)

by inserting or industry internships after summer programs; and

(III)

by striking the flush text following clause (iv); and

(iii)

by striking subparagraph (C);

(B)

in paragraph (2)—

(i)

by striking mathematics and science programs and inserting STEM programs;

(ii)

by inserting and, as appropriate, elementary schools, after with secondary schools;

(iii)

by striking mathematics and science education and inserting STEM education;

(iv)

by striking secondary school students and inserting students at these schools;

(v)

by striking science and advanced-technology fields and inserting STEM and advanced-technology fields; and

(vi)

by striking agreements with local educational agencies and inserting articulation agreements or dual credit courses with local secondary schools, or other means as the Director determines appropriate,; and

(C)

in paragraph (3)—

(i)

by striking subparagraph (B);

(ii)

by striking shall—and all that follows through establish a and inserting shall establish a;

(iii)

by striking the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics and inserting STEM fields; and

(iv)

by striking ; and and inserting , including jobs at Federal and academic laboratories.;

(5)

in subsection (d)(2)—

(A)

in subparagraph (D), by striking and after the semicolon;

(B)

in subparagraph (E), by striking the period at the end and inserting a semicolon; and

(C)

by adding at the end the following:

(F)

as appropriate, applications that apply the best practices for STEM education and technical skills education through distance learning or in a simulated work environment, as determined by research described in subsection (f); and

;

(6)

in subsection (g), by striking the second sentence;

(7)

in subsection (h)(1)—

(A)

in subparagraph (A), by striking 2022 and inserting 2026;

(B)

in subparagraph (B), by striking 2022 and inserting 2026; and

(C)

in subparagraph (C)—

(i)

by striking up to $2,500,000 and inserting not less than $3,000,000; and

(ii)

by striking 2022 and inserting 2026;

(8)

in subsection (i)—

(A)

by striking paragraph (3); and

(B)

by redesignating paragraphs (4) and (5) as paragraphs (3) and (4), respectively; and

(9)

in subsection (j)—

(A)

by striking paragraph (1) and inserting the following:

(1)

the term advanced-technology includes technological fields such as advanced manufacturing, agricultural-, biological- and chemical-technologies, energy and environmental technologies, engineering technologies, information technologies, micro and nano-technologies, cybersecurity technologies, geospatial technologies, and new, emerging technology areas;

;

(B)

in paragraph (4), by striking separate bachelor-degree-granting institutions and inserting other entities;

(C)

by striking paragraph (7);

(D)

by redesignating paragraphs (8) and (9) as paragraphs (7) and (8), respectively;

(E)

in paragraph (7), as redesignated by subparagraph (D), by striking and after the semicolon;

(F)

in paragraph (8), as redesignated by subparagraph (D)—

(i)

by striking mathematics, science, engineering, or technology and inserting science, technology, engineering, or mathematics; and

(ii)

by striking the period at the end and inserting ; and; and

(G)

by adding at the end the following:

(9)

the term skilled technical workforce means workers—

(A)

in occupations that use significant levels of science and engineering expertise and technical knowledge; and

(B)

whose level of educational attainment is less than a bachelor degree.

.

(c)

Authorization of appropriations

Section 5 of the Scientific and Advanced-Technology Act of 1992 (42 U.S.C. 1862j) is amended to read as follows:

5.

Authorization of appropriations

There are authorized to be appropriated to the Director (from sums otherwise authorized to be appropriated for the Foundation) for carrying out sections 2 through 4, $150,000,000 for fiscal years 2022 through 2026.

.

2206.

Intramural emerging institutions pilot program

(a)

Establishment

The Director shall conduct multiple pilot programs within the Foundation to expand the number of institutions of higher education (including such institutions that are community colleges), and other eligible entities that the Director determines appropriate, that are able to successfully compete for Foundation grants.

(b)

Components

Each pilot program described in subsection (a) shall include at least 1 of the following elements:

(1)

A mentorship program.

(2)

Grant writing technical assistance.

(3)

Targeted outreach, including to a minority-serving institution (including a historically Black college or university, a Tribal college or university, or a Hispanic-serving institution or an institution of higher education with an established STEM capacity building program focused on traditionally underrepresented populations in STEM, including Native Hawaiians, Alaska Natives, and Indians).

(4)

Programmatic support or solutions for institutions or entities that do not have an experienced grant management office.

(5)

An increase in the number of grant reviewers from institutions of higher education that have not traditionally received funds from the Foundation.

(6)

An increase of the term and funding, for a period of 3 years or less, as appropriate, to a principal investigator that is a first-time grant awardee, when paired with regular mentoring on the administrative aspects of grant management.

(c)

Limitation

As appropriate, each pilot program described in subsection (a) shall work to reduce administrative burdens.

(d)

Agency-wide programs

Not later than 5 years after the date of enactment of this division, the Director shall—

(1)

review the results of the pilot programs described in subsection (a); and

(2)

develop agency-wide best practices from the pilot programs for implementation across the Foundation, in order to fulfill the requirement under section 3(e) of the National Science Foundation Act of 1950 (42 U.S.C. 1862(e)).

2207.

Public-private partnerships

(a)

In general

The Director shall pursue partnerships with private industry, private foundations, or other appropriate private entities to—

(1)

enhance the impact of the Foundation’s investments and contributions to the United States economic competitiveness and security; and

(2)

make available infrastructure, expertise, and financial resources to the United States scientific and engineering research and education enterprise.

(b)

Merit Review

Nothing in this section shall be construed as altering any intellectual or broader impacts criteria at the Foundation for evaluating grant applications.

2208.

AI Scholarship-for-Service Act

(a)

Definitions

In this section:

(1)

Artificial intelligence

The term artificial intelligence or AI has the meaning given the term artificial intelligence in section 238(g) of the John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (10 U.S.C. 2358 note).

(2)

Executive agency

The term executive agency has the meaning given the term Executive agency in section 105 of title 5, United States Code.

(3)

Registered internship

The term registered internship means a Federal Registered Internship Program coordinated through the Department of Labor.

(b)

In general

The Director, in coordination with the Director of the Office of Personnel Management, the Director of the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and the heads of other agencies with appropriate scientific knowledge, shall establish a Federal artificial intelligence scholarship-for-service program (referred to in this section as the Federal AI Scholarship-for-Service Program) to recruit and train artificial intelligence professionals to lead and support the application of artificial intelligence to the missions of Federal, State, local, and Tribal governments.

(c)

Qualified institution of higher education

The Director, in coordination with the heads of other agencies with appropriate scientific knowledge, shall establish criteria to designate qualified institutions of higher education that shall be eligible to participate in the Federal AI Scholarship-for-Service program. Such criteria shall include—

(1)

measures of the institution’s demonstrated excellence in the education of students in the field of artificial intelligence; and

(2)

measures of the institution’s ability to attract and retain a diverse and non-traditional student population in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, which may include the ability to attract women, minorities, and individuals with disabilities.

(d)

Program description and components

The Federal AI Scholarship-for-Service Program shall—

(1)

provide scholarships through qualified institutions of higher education to students who are enrolled in programs of study at institutions of higher education leading to degrees or concentrations in or related to the artificial intelligence field;

(2)

provide the scholarship recipients with summer internship opportunities, registered internships, or other meaningful temporary appointments in the Federal workforce focusing on AI projects or research;

(3)

prioritize the employment placement of scholarship recipients in executive agencies;

(4)

identify opportunities to promote multi-disciplinary programs of study that integrate basic or advanced AI training with other fields of study, including those that address the social, economic, legal, and ethical implications of human interaction with AI systems; and

(5)

support capacity-building education research programs that will enable postsecondary educational institutions to expand their ability to train the next-generation AI workforce, including AI researchers and practitioners.

(e)

Scholarship amounts

Each scholarship under subsection (d) shall be in an amount that covers the student’s tuition and fees at the institution for not more than 3 years and provides the student with an additional stipend.

(f)

Post-award employment obligations

Each scholarship recipient, as a condition of receiving a scholarship under the program, shall enter into an agreement under which the recipient agrees to work for a period equal to the length of the scholarship, following receipt of the student’s degree, in the AI mission of—

(1)

an executive agency;

(2)

Congress, including any agency, entity, office, or commission established in the legislative branch;

(3)

an interstate agency;

(4)

a State, local, or Tribal government, which may include instruction in AI-related skill sets in a public school system; or

(5)

a State, local, or Tribal government-affiliated nonprofit entity that is considered to be critical infrastructure (as defined in section 1016(e) of the USA Patriot Act (42 U.S.C. 5195c(e))).

(g)

Hiring authority

(1)

Appointment in excepted service

Notwithstanding any provision of chapter 33 of title 5, United States Code, governing appointments in the competitive service, an executive agency may appoint an individual who has completed the eligible degree program for which a scholarship was awarded to a position in the excepted service in the executive agency.

(2)

Noncompetitive conversion

Except as provided in paragraph (4), upon fulfillment of the service term, an employee appointed under paragraph (1) may be converted noncompetitively to term, career-conditional, or career appointment.

(3)

Timing of conversion

An executive agency may noncompetitively convert a term employee appointed under paragraph (2) to a career-conditional or career appointment before the term appointment expires.

(4)

Authority to decline conversion

An executive agency may decline to make the noncompetitive conversion or appointment under paragraph (2) for cause.

(h)

Eligibility

To be eligible to receive a scholarship under this section, an individual shall—

(1)

be a citizen or lawful permanent resident of the United States;

(2)

demonstrate a commitment to a career in advancing the field of AI;

(3)

be—

(A)

a full-time student in an eligible degree program at a qualified institution of higher education, as determined by the Director;

(B)

a student pursuing a degree on a less than full-time basis, but not less than half-time basis; or

(C)

an AI faculty member on sabbatical to advance knowledge in the field; and

(4)

accept the terms of a scholarship under this section.

(i)

Conditions of support

(1)

In general

As a condition of receiving a scholarship under this section, a recipient shall agree to provide the qualified institution of higher education with annual verifiable documentation of post-award employment and up-to-date contact information.

(2)

Terms

A scholarship recipient under this section shall be liable to the United States as provided in subsection (k) if the individual—

(A)

fails to maintain an acceptable level of academic standing at the applicable institution of higher education, as determined by the Director;

(B)

is dismissed from the applicable institution of higher education for disciplinary reasons;

(C)

withdraws from the eligible degree program before completing the program;

(D)

declares that the individual does not intend to fulfill the post-award employment obligation under this section; or

(E)

fails to fulfill the post-award employment obligation of the individual under this section.

(j)

Monitoring compliance

As a condition of participating in the program, a qualified institution of higher education shall—

(1)

enter into an agreement with the Director to monitor the compliance of scholarship recipients with respect to their post-award employment obligations; and

(2)

provide to the Director, on an annual basis, the post-award employment documentation required under subsection (i) for scholarship recipients through the completion of their post-award employment obligations.

(k)

Amount of repayment

(1)

Less than 1 year of service

If a circumstance described in subsection (i)(2) occurs before the completion of 1 year of a post-award employment obligation under this section, the total amount of scholarship awards received by the individual under this section shall—

(A)

be repaid; or

(B)

be treated as a loan to be repaid in accordance with subsection (l).

(2)

1 or more years of service

If a circumstance described in subparagraph (D) or (E) of subsection (i)(2) occurs after the completion of 1 or more years of a post-award employment obligation under this section, the total amount of scholarship awards received by the individual under this section, reduced by the ratio of the number of years of service completed divided by the number of years of service required, shall—

(A)

be repaid; or

(B)

be treated as a loan to be repaid in accordance with subsection (l).

(l)

Repayments

A loan described in subsection (k) shall—

(1)

be treated as a Federal Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loan under part D of title IV of the Higher Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1087a et seq.); and

(2)

be subject to repayment, together with interest thereon accruing from the date of the scholarship award, in accordance with terms and conditions specified by the Director (in consultation with the Secretary of Education).

(m)

Collection of repayment

(1)

In general

In the event that a scholarship recipient is required to repay the scholarship award under this section, the qualified institution of higher education providing the scholarship shall—

(A)

determine the repayment amounts and notify the recipient and the Director of the amounts owed; and

(B)

collect the repayment amounts within a period of time as determined by the Director, or the repayment amounts shall be treated as a loan in accordance with subsection (l).

(2)

Returned to treasury

Except as provided in paragraph (3), any repayment under this subsection shall be returned to the Treasury of the United States.

(3)

Retain percentage

A qualified institution of higher education may retain a percentage of any repayment the institution collects under this subsection to defray administrative costs associated with the collection. The Director shall establish a fixed percentage that will apply to all eligible entities, and may update this percentage as needed, in the determination of the Director.

(n)

Exceptions

The Director may provide for the partial or total waiver or suspension of any service or payment obligation by an individual under this section whenever compliance by the individual with the obligation is impossible or would involve extreme hardship to the individual, or if enforcement of such obligation with respect to the individual would be unconscionable.

(o)

Public information

(1)

Evaluation

The Director, in coordination with the Director of the Office of Personnel Management, shall annually evaluate and make public, in a manner that protects the personally identifiable information of scholarship recipients, information on the success of recruiting individuals for scholarships under this section and on hiring and retaining those individuals in the public sector AI workforce, including information on—

(A)

placement rates;

(B)

where students are placed, including job titles and descriptions;

(C)

salary ranges for students not released from obligations under this section;

(D)

how long after graduation students are placed;

(E)

how long students stay in the positions they enter upon graduation;

(F)

how many students are released from obligations; and

(G)

what, if any, remedial training is required.

(2)

Reports

The Director, in coordination with the Office of Personnel Management, shall submit, not less frequently than once every 3 years, to the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs of the Senate, the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the Senate, the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology of the House of Representatives, and the Committee on Oversight and Reform of the House of Representatives a report, including the results of the evaluation under paragraph (1) and any recent statistics regarding the size, composition, and educational requirements of the Federal AI workforce.

(3)

Resources

The Director, in coordination with the Director of the Office of Personnel Management, shall provide consolidated and user-friendly online resources for prospective scholarship recipients, including, to the extent practicable—

(A)

searchable, up-to-date, and accurate information about participating institutions of higher education and job opportunities related to the AI field; and

(B)

a modernized description of AI careers.

(p)

Refresh

Not less than once every 2 years, the Director, in coordination with the Director of the Office of Personnel Management, shall review and update the Federal AI Scholarship-for-Service Program to reflect advances in technology.

2209.

Geographic diversity

(a)

Directorate

The Director shall use not less than 20 percent of the funds provided to the Directorate, for each fiscal year, to carry out the program under section 113 of the National Science Foundation Authorization Act of 1988 (42 U.S.C. 1862g) for the purposes of carrying out sections 2104, 2106, 2107, 2108, and 2109 of this Act.

(b)

National Science Foundation

The Director shall use not less than 20 percent of the funds provided to the Foundation, for each fiscal year, to carry out the program under section 113 of the National Science Foundation Authorization Act of 1988 (42 U.S.C. 1862g).

(c)

Department of Energy

The Secretary of Energy shall use not less than 20 percent of the funds provided to the Department of Energy under section 2117 for each fiscal year to carry out the program under section 2203(b)(3) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (42 U.S.C. 13503(b)(3)).

(d)

Consortia

In the case of an award to a consortium under this division, the Director may count the entire award toward meeting the funding requirements of this section if the lead entity of the consortium is located in a jurisdiction that is eligible to participate in the program under section 113 of the National Science Foundation Authorization Act of 1988 (42 U.S.C. 1862g). In the case of an award to a consortium under this division, the Secretary may count the entire award toward meeting the funding requirements of this section if the lead entity of the consortium is located in a jurisdiction that is eligible to participate in the program under section 2203(b)(3) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (42 U.S.C. 13503(b)(3)).

2210.

Rural STEM Education Act

(a)

Definitions

In this section:

(1)

Federal laboratory

The term Federal laboratory has the meaning given such term in section 4 of the Stevenson-Wydler Technology Innovation Act of 1980 (15 U.S.C. 3703).

(2)

Institution of higher education

The term institution of higher education has the meaning given such term in section 101(a) of the Higher Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1001(a)).

(3)

STEM

The term STEM has the meaning given the term in section 2 of the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010 (42 U.S.C. 6621 note).

(4)

STEM education

The term STEM education has the meaning given the term in section 2 of the STEM Education Act of 2015 (42 U.S.C. 6621 note).

(b)

National Science Foundation rural stem activities

(1)

Preparing rural STEM educators

(A)

In general

The Director shall provide grants on a merit-reviewed, competitive basis to institutions of higher education or nonprofit organizations (or a consortium thereof) for research and development to advance innovative approaches to support and sustain high-quality STEM teaching in rural schools.

(B)

Use of funds

(i)

In general

Grants awarded under this paragraph shall be used for the research and development activities referred to in subparagraph (A), which may include—

(I)

engaging rural educators of students in prekindergarten through grade 12 in professional learning opportunities to enhance STEM knowledge, including computer science, and develop best practices;

(II)

supporting research on effective STEM teaching practices in rural settings, including the use of rubrics and mastery-based grading practices to assess student performance when employing the transdisciplinary teaching approach for STEM disciplines;

(III)

designing and developing pre-service and in-service training resources to assist such rural educators in adopting transdisciplinary teaching practices across STEM courses;

(IV)

coordinating with local partners to adapt STEM teaching practices to leverage local, natural, and community assets in order to support in-place learning in rural areas;

(V)

providing hands-on training and research opportunities for rural educators described in subclause (I) at Federal laboratories or institutions of higher education, or in industry;

(VI)

developing training and best practices for educators who teach multiple grade levels within a STEM discipline;

(VII)

designing and implementing professional development courses and experiences, including mentoring, for rural educators described in subclause (I) that combine face-to-face and online experiences; and

(VIII)

any other activity the Director determines will accomplish the goals of this paragraph.

(ii)

Rural stem collaborative

The Director shall establish a pilot program of regional cohorts in rural areas that will provide peer support, mentoring, and hands-on research experiences for rural STEM educators of students in prekindergarten through grade 12, in order to build an ecosystem of cooperation among educators, researchers, academia, and local industry.

(2)

Broadening participation of rural students in STEM

(A)

In general

The Director shall provide grants on a merit-reviewed, competitive basis to institutions of higher education or nonprofit organizations (or a consortium thereof) for—

(i)

research and development of programming to identify the barriers rural students face in accessing high-quality STEM education; and

(ii)

development of innovative solutions to improve the participation and advancement of rural students in prekindergarten through grade 12 in STEM studies.

(B)

Use of funds

(i)

In general

Grants awarded under this paragraph shall be used for the research and development activities referred to in subparagraph (A), which may include—

(I)

developing partnerships with community colleges to offer advanced STEM course work, including computer science, to rural high school students;

(II)

supporting research on effective STEM practices in rural settings;

(III)

implementing a school-wide STEM approach;

(IV)

improving the Foundation’s Advanced Technology Education program’s coordination and engagement with rural communities;

(V)

collaborating with existing community partners and networks, such as the Cooperative Extension System services and extramural research programs of the Department of Agriculture and youth serving organizations like 4–H, after school STEM programs, and summer STEM programs, to leverage community resources and develop place-based programming;

(VI)

connecting rural school districts and institutions of higher education, to improve precollegiate STEM education and engagement;

(VII)

supporting partnerships that offer hands-on inquiry-based science activities, including coding, and access to lab resources for students studying STEM in prekindergarten through grade 12 in a rural area;

(VIII)

evaluating the role of broadband connectivity and its associated impact on the STEM and technology literacy of rural students;

(IX)

building capacity to support extracurricular STEM programs in rural schools, including mentor-led engagement programs, STEM programs held during nonschool hours, STEM networks, makerspaces, coding activities, and competitions; and

(X)

any other activity the Director determines will accomplish the goals of this paragraph.

(3)

Application

An applicant seeking a grant under paragraph (1) or (2) shall submit an application at such time, in such manner, and containing such information as the Director may require. The application may include the following:

(A)

A description of the target population to be served by the research activity or activities for which such grant is sought.

(B)

A description of the process for recruitment and selection of students, educators, or schools from rural areas to participate in such activity or activities.

(C)

A description of how such activity or activities may inform efforts to promote the engagement and achievement of rural students in prekindergarten through grade 12 in STEM studies.

(D)

In the case of a proposal consisting of a partnership or partnerships with one or more rural schools and one or more researchers, a plan for establishing a sustained partnership that is jointly developed and managed, draws from the capacities of each partner, and is mutually beneficial.

(4)

Partnerships

In awarding grants under paragraph (1) or (2), the Director shall—

(A)

encourage applicants which, for the purpose of the activity or activities funded through the grant, include or partner with a nonprofit organization or an institution of higher education (or a consortium thereof) that has extensive experience and expertise in increasing the participation of rural students in prekindergarten through grade 12 in STEM; and

(B)

encourage applicants which, for the purpose of the activity or activities funded through the grant, include or partner with a consortium of rural schools or rural school districts.

(5)

Evaluations

All proposals for grants under paragraphs (1) and (2) shall include an evaluation plan that includes the use of outcome-oriented measures to assess the impact and efficacy of the grant. Each recipient of a grant under this subsection shall include results from these evaluative activities in annual and final projects.

(6)

Accountability and dissemination

(A)

Evaluation required

The Director shall evaluate the portfolio of grants awarded under paragraphs (1) and (2). Such evaluation shall—

(i)

assess the results of research conducted under such grants and identify best practices; and

(ii)

to the extent practicable, integrate the findings of research resulting from the activity or activities funded through such grants with the findings of other research on rural students' pursuit of degrees or careers in STEM.

(B)

Report on evaluations

Not later than 180 days after the completion of the evaluation under subparagraph (A), the Director shall submit to Congress and make widely available to the public a report that includes—

(i)

the results of the evaluation; and

(ii)

any recommendations for administrative and legislative action that could optimize the effectiveness of the grants awarded under this subsection.

(7)

Report by committee on equal opportunities in science and engineering

As part of the first report required by section 36(e) of the Science and Engineering Equal Opportunities Act (42 U.S.C. 1885c(e)) transmitted to Congress after the date of enactment of this division, the Committee on Equal Opportunities in Science and Engineering shall include—

(A)

a description of past and present policies and activities of the Foundation to encourage full participation of students in rural communities in science, mathematics, engineering, and computer science fields; and

(B)

an assessment of the policies and activities of the Foundation, along with proposals for new strategies or the broadening of existing successful strategies towards facilitating the goal of increasing participation of rural students in prekindergarten through grade 12 in Foundation activities.

(8)

Coordination

In carrying out this subsection, the Director shall, for purposes of enhancing program effectiveness and avoiding duplication of activities, consult, cooperate, and coordinate with the programs and policies of other relevant Federal agencies.

(c)

Opportunities for online education

(1)

In general

The Director shall award competitive grants to institutions of higher education or nonprofit organizations (or a consortium thereof, which may include a private sector partner) to conduct research on online STEM education courses for rural communities.

(2)

Research areas

The research areas eligible for funding under this subsection shall include—

(A)

evaluating the learning and achievement of rural students in prekindergarten through grade 12 in STEM subjects;

(B)

understanding how computer-based and online professional development courses and mentor experiences can be integrated to meet the needs of educators of rural students in prekindergarten through grade 12;

(C)

combining computer-based and online STEM education and training with apprenticeships, mentoring, or other applied learning arrangements;

(D)

leveraging online programs to supplement STEM studies for rural students that need physical and academic accommodation; and

(E)

any other activity the Director determines will accomplish the goals of this subsection.

(3)

Evaluations

All proposals for grants under this subsection shall include an evaluation plan that includes the use of outcome-oriented measures to assess the impact and efficacy of the grant. Each recipient of a grant under this subsection shall include results from these evaluative activities in annual and final projects.

(4)

Accountability and dissemination

(A)

Evaluation required

The Director shall evaluate the portfolio of grants awarded under this subsection. Such evaluation shall—

(i)

use a common set of benchmarks and tools to assess the results of research conducted under such grants and identify best practices; and

(ii)

to the extent practicable, integrate findings from activities carried out pursuant to research conducted under this subsection, with respect to the pursuit of careers and degrees in STEM, with those activities carried out pursuant to other research on serving rural students and communities.

(B)

Report on evaluations

Not later than 180 days after the completion of the evaluation under subparagraph (A), the Director shall submit to Congress and make widely available to the public a report that includes—

(i)

the results of the evaluation; and

(ii)

any recommendations for administrative and legislative action that could optimize the effectiveness of the grants awarded under this subsection.

(5)

Coordination

In carrying out this subsection, the Director shall, for purposes of enhancing program effectiveness and avoiding duplication of activities, consult, cooperate, and coordinate with the programs and policies of other relevant Federal agencies.

(d)

National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine evaluation

(1)

Study

Not later than 12 months after the date of enactment of this division, the Director shall enter into an agreement with the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine under which the National Academies agree to conduct an evaluation and assessment that—

(A)

evaluates the quality and quantity of current Federal programming and research directed at examining STEM education for students in prekindergarten through grade 12 and workforce development in rural areas;

(B)

in coordination with the Federal Communications Commission, assesses the impact that the scarcity of broadband connectivity in rural communities, and the affordability of broadband connectivity, have on STEM and technical literacy for students in prekindergarten through grade 12 in rural areas;

(C)

assesses the core research and data needed to understand the challenges rural areas are facing in providing quality STEM education and workforce development;

(D)

makes recommendations for action at the Federal, State, and local levels for improving STEM education, including online STEM education, for students in prekindergarten through grade 12 and workforce development in rural areas; and

(E)

makes recommendations to inform the implementation of programs in subsections (a), (b), and (c).

(2)

Report to director

The agreement entered into under paragraph (1) shall require the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, not later than 24 months after the date of enactment of this division, to submit to the Director a report on the study conducted under such paragraph, including the National Academies' findings and recommendations.

(e)

GAO review

Not later than 3 years after the date of enactment of this division, the Comptroller General of the United States shall conduct a study on the engagement of rural populations in Federal STEM programs and submit to Congress a report that includes—

(1)

an assessment of how Federal STEM education programs are serving rural populations;

(2)

a description of initiatives carried out by Federal agencies that are targeted at supporting STEM education in rural areas;

(3)

an assessment of what is known about the impact and effectiveness of Federal investments in STEM education programs that are targeted to rural areas; and

(4)

an assessment of challenges that State and Federal STEM education programs face in reaching rural population centers.

(f)

Capacity building through EPSCoR

Section 517(f)(2) of the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010 (42 U.S.C. 1862p–9(f)(2)) is amended—

(1)

in subparagraph (A), by striking and at the end; and

(2)

by adding at the end the following:

(C)

to increase the capacity of rural communities to provide quality STEM education and STEM workforce development programming to students and teachers; and

.

(g)

NIST engagement with rural communities

(1)

MEP outreach

Section 25 of the National Institute of Standards and Technology Act (15 U.S.C. 278k) is amended—

(A)

in subsection (c)—

(i)

in paragraph (6), by striking community colleges and area career and technical education schools and inserting the following: secondary schools (as defined in section 8101 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 7801)), community colleges, and area career and technical education schools, including those in underserved and rural communities,; and

(ii)

in paragraph (7)—

(I)

by striking and local colleges and inserting the following: local high schools and local colleges, including those in underserved and rural communities,; and

(II)

by inserting or other applied learning opportunities after apprenticeships; and

(B)

in subsection (d)(3), by striking , community colleges, and area career and technical education schools, and inserting the following: and local high schools, community colleges, and area career and technical education schools, including those in underserved and rural communities,.

(2)

Rural connectivity prize competition

(A)

Prize competition

Pursuant to section 24 of the Stevenson-Wydler Technology Innovation Act of 1980 (15 U.S.C. 3719), the Secretary of Commerce shall carry out a program to award prizes competitively to stimulate research and development of creative technologies to support the deployment of affordable and reliable broadband connectivity in rural communities, including unserved rural communities.

(B)

Plan for deployment in rural communities

Each proposal submitted pursuant to subparagraph (A) shall include a proposed plan for deployment of the technology that is the subject of such proposal.

(C)

Prize amount

In carrying out the program under subparagraph (A), the Secretary may award not more than a total of $5,000,000 to one or more winners of the prize competition.

(D)

Report

Not later than 60 days after the date on which a prize is awarded under the prize competition, the Secretary shall submit to the relevant committees of Congress a report that describes the winning proposal of the prize competition.

(E)

Consultation

In carrying out the program under this paragraph, the Secretary shall consult with the Federal Communications Commission and the heads of relevant departments and agencies of the Federal Government.

2211.

Quantum Network Infrastructure and Workforce Development Act

(a)

Definitions

In this section:

(1)

ESEA definitions

The terms elementary school, high school, local educational agency, and secondary school have the meanings given those terms in section 8101 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 7801).

(2)

Appropriate committees of congress

The term appropriate committees of Congress has the meaning given such term in section 2 of the National Quantum Initiative Act (15 U.S.C. 8801).

(3)

Interagency working group

The term Interagency Working Group means the QIS Workforce Working Group under the Subcommittee on Quantum Information Science of the National Science and Technology Council.

(4)

Q2work program

The term Q2Work Program means the Q2Work Program supported by the Foundation.

(5)

Quantum information science

The term quantum information science has the meaning given such term in section 2 of the National Quantum Initiative Act (15 U.S.C. 8801).

(6)

STEM

The term “STEM” has the meaning given the term in section 2 of the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010 (42 U.S.C. 6621 note).

(b)

Quantum networking working group report on quantum networking and communications

(1)

Report

Not later than 3 years after the date of the enactment of this division, the Quantum Networking Working Group within the Subcommittee on Quantum Information Science of the National Science and Technology Council shall submit to the appropriate committees of Congress a report detailing a plan for the advancement of quantum networking and communications technology in the United States, building on A Strategic Vision for America’s Quantum Networks and A Coordinated Approach for Quantum Networking Research.

(2)

Requirements

The report under paragraph (1) shall include—

(A)

a framework for interagency collaboration on the advancement of quantum networking and communications research;

(B)

a plan for interagency collaboration on the development and drafting of international standards for quantum communications technology, including standards relating to—

(i)

quantum cryptography and post-quantum classical cryptography;

(ii)

network security;

(iii)

quantum network infrastructure;

(iv)

transmission of quantum information through optical fiber networks; and

(v)

any other technologies considered appropriate by the Working Group;

(C)

a proposal for the protection of national security interests relating to the advancement of quantum networking and communications technology;

(D)

recommendations to Congress for legislative action relating to the framework, plan, and proposal set forth pursuant to subparagraphs (A), (B), and (C), respectively; and

(E)

such other matters as the Working Group considers necessary to advance the security of communications and network infrastructure, remain at the forefront of scientific discovery in the quantum information science domain, and transition quantum information science research into the emerging quantum technology economy.

(c)

Quantum networking and communications research

(1)

Research

The Under Secretary of Commerce for Standards and Technology shall carry out research to facilitate the development and standardization of quantum networking and communications technologies and applications, including research on the following:

(A)

Quantum cryptography and post-quantum classical cryptography.

(B)

Quantum repeater technology.

(C)

Quantum network traffic management.

(D)

Quantum transduction.

(E)

Long baseline entanglement and teleportation.

(F)

Such other technologies, processes, or applications as the Under Secretary considers appropriate.

(2)

Implementation

The Under Secretary shall carry out the research required by paragraph (1) through such divisions, laboratories, offices and programs of the National Institute of Standards and Technology as the Under Secretary considers appropriate and actively engaged in activities relating to quantum information science.

(3)

Development of standards

For quantum technologies deemed by the Under Secretary to be at a readiness level sufficient for standardization, the Under Secretary shall provide technical review and assistance to such other Federal agencies as the Under Secretary considers appropriate for the development of quantum network infrastructure standards.

(4)

Authorization of appropriations

(A)

In general

There is authorized to be appropriated to the Scientific and Technical Research and Services account of the National Institute of Standards and Technology to carry out this subsection $10,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2022 through 2026.

(B)

Supplement, not supplant

The amounts authorized to be appropriated under subparagraph (A) shall supplement and not supplant amounts already appropriated to the account described in such subparagraph.

(d)

Quantum workforce evaluation and acceleration

(1)

Identification of gaps

The Foundation shall enter into an agreement with the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine to conduct a study of ways to support the next generation of quantum leaders.

(2)

Scope of study

In carrying out the study described in paragraph (1), the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine shall identify—

(A)

education gaps, including foundational courses in STEM and areas in need of standardization, in elementary school, middle school, high school, and higher education curricula, that need to be rectified in order to prepare students to participate in the quantum workforce;

(B)

the skills and workforce needs of industry, specifically identifying the cross-disciplinary academic degrees or academic courses necessary—

(i)

to qualify students for multiple career pathways in quantum information sciences and related fields;

(ii)

to ensure the United States is competitive in the field of quantum information science while preserving national security; and

(iii)

to support the development of quantum applications; and

(C)

the resources and materials needed to train elementary, middle, and high school educators to effectively teach curricula relevant to the development of a quantum workforce.

(3)

Reports

(A)

Executive summary

Not later than 2 years after the date of enactment of this division, the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine shall prepare and submit to the Foundation, and programs or projects funded by the Foundation, an executive summary of progress regarding the study conducted under paragraph (1) that outlines the findings of the Academies as of such date.

(B)

Report

Not later than 3 years after the date of enactment of this division, the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine shall prepare and submit a report containing the results of the study conducted under paragraph (1) to Congress, the Foundation, and programs or projects funded by the Foundation that are relevant to the acceleration of a quantum workforce.

(e)

Incorporating QISE into STEM curriculum

(1)

In general

The Foundation shall, through programs carried out or supported by the Foundation, prioritize the better integration of quantum information science and engineering (referred to in this subsection as QISE) into the STEM curriculum for each grade level from kindergarten through grade 12, and community colleges.

(2)

Requirements

The curriculum integration under paragraph (1) shall include—

(A)

methods to conceptualize QISE for elementary, middle, and high school curricula;

(B)

methods for strengthening foundational mathematics and science curricula;

(C)

age-appropriate materials that apply the principles of quantum information science in STEM fields;

(D)

recommendations for the standardization of key concepts, definitions, and curriculum criteria across government, academia, and industry; and

(E)

materials that specifically address the findings and outcomes of the study conducted under subsection (d) and strategies to account for the skills and workforce needs identified through the study.

(3)

Coordination

In carrying out this subsection, the Foundation, including the STEM Education Advisory Panel and the Advancing Informal STEM Learning program and through the Foundation’s role in the National Q–12 Education Partnership and the programs such as the Q2Work Program, shall coordinate with the Office of Science and Technology Policy, EPSCoR eligible universities, and any Federal agencies or working groups determined necessary by the Foundation.

(4)

Review

In implementing this subsection, the Foundation shall support the community expansion of the related report entitled Key Concepts for Future QIS Learners (May 2020).

(f)

Quantum education pilot program

(1)

In general

The Foundation, through the Foundation’s role in the National Q–12 Education Partnership and programs such as Q2Work Program, and in coordination with the Directorate for Education and Human Resources, shall carry out a pilot program, to be known as the Next Generation Quantum Leaders Pilot Program, to provide funding for the education and training of the next generation of students in the fundamental principles of quantum mechanics.

(2)

Requirements

(A)

In general

In carrying out the pilot program required by paragraph (1), the Foundation shall—

(i)

publish a call for applications through the National Q–12 Education Partnership website (or similar website) for participation in the pilot program from elementary schools, secondary schools, and State educational agencies as determined appropriate by the Foundation;

(ii)

coordinate with educational service agencies, associations that support STEM educators or local educational agencies, and partnerships through the Q–12 Education Partnership, to encourage elementary schools, secondary schools, and State educational agencies to participate in the program as determined appropriate by the Foundation;

(iii)

accept applications in advance of the academic year in which the program shall begin; and

(iv)

select elementary schools, secondary schools, and State educational agencies to participate in the program, as determined appropriate by the Foundation, in accordance with qualifications determined by the QIS Workforce Working Group, in coordination with the National Q–12 Education Partnership.

(B)

Prioritization

In selecting program participants under subparagraph (A)(iv), the Director of the Foundation shall give priority to elementary schools, secondary schools, and local educational agencies located in jurisdictions eligible to participate in the Established Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (commonly known as EPSCoR), including Tribal and rural elementary, middle, and high schools in such jurisdictions.

(3)

Consultation

The Foundation shall carry out this subsection in consultation with the QIS Workforce Working Group and the Advancing Informal STEM Learning Program.

(4)

Reporting

(A)

Report and selected participants

Not later than 90 days following the closing of the application period under paragraph (2)(A)(iii), the Director of the Foundation shall submit to Congress a report on the educational institutions selected to participate in the pilot program required under paragraph (1), specifying the percentage from nontraditional geographies, including Tribal or rural school districts.

(B)

Report on implementation of curriculum

Not later than 2 years after the date of enactment of this division, the Director of the Foundation shall submit to Congress a report on implementation of the curricula and materials under the pilot program, including the feasibility and advisability of expanding such pilot program to include additional educational institutions beyond those originally selected to participate in the pilot program.

(5)

Authorization of appropriations

There is authorized to be appropriated such funds as may be necessary to carry out this subsection.

(6)

Termination

This subsection shall cease to have effect on the date that is 3 years after the date of the enactment of this division.

(g)

Energy sciences network

(1)

In general

The Secretary of Energy (referred to in this subsection as the Secretary), in coordination with the National Science Foundation and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, shall supplement the Energy Sciences Network User Facility (referred to in this subsection as the Network) with dedicated quantum network infrastructure to advance development of quantum networking and communications technology.

(2)

Purpose

The purpose of paragraph (1) is to utilize the Network to advance a broad range of testing and research, including relating to—

(A)

the establishment of stable, long-baseline quantum entanglement and teleportation;

(B)

quantum repeater technologies for long-baseline communication purposes;

(C)

quantum transduction;

(D)

the coexistence of quantum and classical information;

(E)

multiplexing, forward error correction, wavelength routing algorithms, and other quantum networking infrastructure; and

(F)

any other technologies or applications determined necessary by the Secretary.

(3)

Authorization of appropriations

There are authorized to be appropriated to the Secretary to carry out this subsection, $10,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2022 through 2026.

2212.

Supporting Early-Career Researchers Act

(a)

Short title

This section may be cited as the Supporting Early-Career Researchers Act.

(b)

In general

The Director may establish a 2-year pilot program to award grants to highly qualified early-career investigators to carry out an independent research program at the institution of higher education or participating Federal research facility chosen by such investigator, to last for a period not greater than 2 years.

(c)

Priority for broadening participation

In awarding grants under this section, the Director shall give priority to—

(1)

early-career investigators who are from groups that are underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics research;

(2)

early-career investigators who choose to carry out independent research at a minority-serving institution (or an institution of higher education with an established STEM capacity building program focused on traditionally underrepresented populations in STEM, including Native Hawaiians, Alaska Natives, and Indians); and

(3)

early-career investigators in a jurisdiction eligible to participate under section 113 of the National Science Foundation Authorization Act of 1988 (42 U.S.C. 1862g).

(d)

Reports from grantees

Not later than 180 days after the end of the pilot program under this section, each early-career investigator who receives a grant under the pilot program shall submit a report to the Director that describes how the early-career investigator used the grant funds.

(e)

Report to Congress

Not later than 180 days after the deadline for the submission of the reports described in subsection (d), the Director shall submit a report to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the Senate and the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology of the House of Representatives that contains a summary of the uses of grant funds under this section and the impact of the pilot program under this section.

2213.

Advancing Precision Agriculture Capabilities Act

(a)

Short title

This section may be cited as the Advancing IoT for Precision Agriculture Act of 2021.

(b)

Purpose

It is the purpose of this section to promote scientific research and development opportunities for connected technologies that advance precision agriculture capabilities.

(c)

Foundation directive on agricultural sensor research

In awarding grants under the sensor systems and networked systems programs of the Foundation, the Director shall include in consideration of portfolio balance research and development on sensor connectivity in environments of intermittent connectivity and intermittent computation—

(1)

to improve the reliable use of advance sensing systems in rural and agricultural areas; and

(2)

that considers—

(A)

direct gateway access for locally stored data;

(B)

attenuation of signal transmission;

(C)

loss of signal transmission; and

(D)

at-scale performance for wireless power.

(d)

Updating considerations for precision agriculture technology within the NSF advanced technical education program

Section 3 of the Scientific and Advanced-Technology Act of 1992 (42 U.S.C. 1862i), as amended by section 2205, is further amended—

(1)

in subsection (d)(2), by adding at the end the following:

(G)

applications that incorporate distance learning tools and approaches.

; and

(2)

in subsection (e)(3)—

(A)

in subparagraph (C), by striking and after the semicolon;

(B)

in subparagraph (D), by striking the period at the end and inserting ; and; and

(C)

by adding at the end the following:

(E)

applications that incorporate distance learning tools and approaches.

.

(e)

GAO review

Not later than 18 months after the date of enactment of this section, the Comptroller General of the United States shall provide—

(1)

a technology assessment of precision agriculture technologies, such as the existing use of—

(A)

sensors, scanners, radio-frequency identification, and related technologies that can monitor soil properties, irrigation conditions, and plant physiology;

(B)

sensors, scanners, radio-frequency identification, and related technologies that can monitor livestock activity and health;

(C)

network connectivity and wireless communications that can securely support digital agriculture technologies in rural and remote areas;

(D)

aerial imagery generated by satellites or unmanned aerial vehicles;

(E)

ground-based robotics;

(F)

control systems design and connectivity, such as smart irrigation control systems; and

(G)

data management software and advanced analytics that can assist decision making and improve agricultural outcomes; and

(2)

a review of Federal programs that provide support for precision agriculture research, development, adoption, education, or training, in existence on the date of enactment of this section.

2214.

Critical minerals mining research

(a)

Critical minerals mining research and development at the Foundation

(1)

In general

In order to support supply chain resiliency, the Director shall issue awards, on a competitive basis, to institutions of higher education or nonprofit organizations (or consortia of such institutions or organizations) to support basic research that will accelerate innovation to advance critical minerals mining strategies and technologies for the purpose of making better use of domestic resources and eliminating national reliance on minerals and mineral materials that are subject to supply disruptions.

(2)

Use of funds

Activities funded by an award under this section may include—

(A)

advancing mining research and development activities to develop new mapping and mining technologies and techniques, including advanced critical mineral extraction and production, to improve existing or to develop new supply chains of critical minerals, and to yield more efficient, economical, and environmentally benign mining practices;

(B)

advancing critical mineral processing research activities to improve separation, alloying, manufacturing, or recycling techniques and technologies that can decrease the energy intensity, waste, potential environmental impact, and costs of those activities;

(C)

conducting long-term earth observation of reclaimed mine sites, including the study of the evolution of microbial diversity at such sites;

(D)

examining the application of artificial intelligence for geological exploration of critical minerals, including what size and diversity of data sets would be required;

(E)

examining the application of machine learning for detection and sorting of critical minerals, including what size and diversity of data sets would be required;

(F)

conducting detailed isotope studies of critical minerals and the development of more refined geologic models; or

(G)

providing training and research opportunities to undergraduate and graduate students to prepare the next generation of mining engineers and researchers.

(b)

Critical minerals interagency subcommittee

(1)

In general

In order to support supply chain resiliency, the Critical Minerals Subcommittee of the National Science and Technology Council (referred to in this subsection as the Subcommittee) shall coordinate Federal science and technology efforts to ensure secure and reliable supplies of critical minerals to the United States.

(2)

Purposes

The purposes of the Subcommittee shall be—

(A)

to advise and assist the Committee on Homeland and National Security and the National Science and Technology Council on United States policies, procedures, and plans as it relates to critical minerals, including—

(i)

Federal research, development, and deployment efforts to optimize methods for extractions, concentration, separation, and purification of conventional, secondary, and unconventional sources of critical minerals;

(ii)

efficient use and reuse of critical minerals;

(iii)

the critical minerals workforce of the United States; and

(iv)

United States private industry investments in innovation and technology transfer from federally funded science and technology;

(B)

to identify emerging opportunities, stimulate international cooperation, and foster the development of secure and reliable supply chains of critical minerals;

(C)

to ensure the transparency of information and data related to critical minerals; and

(D)

to provide recommendations on coordination and collaboration among the research, development, and deployment programs and activities of Federal agencies to promote a secure and reliable supply of critical minerals necessary to maintain national security, economic well-being, and industrial production.

(3)

Responsibilities

In carrying out paragraphs (1) and (2), the Subcommittee may, taking into account the findings and recommendations of relevant advisory committees—

(A)

provide recommendations on how Federal agencies may improve the topographic, geologic, and geophysical mapping of the United States and improve the discoverability, accessibility, and usability of the resulting and existing data, to the extent permitted by law and subject to appropriate limitation for purposes of privacy and security;

(B)

assess the progress toward developing critical minerals recycling and reprocessing technologies, and technological alternatives to critical minerals;

(C)

examine options for accessing and developing critical minerals through investment and trade with allies and partners of the United States and provide recommendations;

(D)

evaluate and provide recommendations to incentivize the development and use of advances in science and technology in the private industry;

(E)

assess the need for and make recommendations to address the challenges the United States critical minerals supply chain workforce faces, including—

(i)

aging and retiring personnel and faculty;

(ii)

public perceptions about the nature of mining and mineral processing; and

(iii)

foreign competition for United States talent;

(F)

develop, and update as necessary, a strategic plan to guide Federal programs and activities to enhance—

(i)

scientific and technical capabilities across critical mineral supply chains, including a roadmap that identifies key research and development needs and coordinates ongoing activities for source diversification, more efficient use, recycling, and substitution for critical minerals; and

(ii)

cross-cutting mining science, data science techniques, materials science, manufacturing science and engineering, computational modeling, and environmental health and safety research and development; and

(G)

report to the appropriate committees of Congress on activities and findings under this subsection.

(4)

Mandatory responsibilities

In carrying out paragraphs (1) and (2), the Subcommittee shall, taking into account the findings and recommendations of the relevant advisory committees, identify and evaluate Federal policies and regulations that restrict the mining of critical minerals.

(c)

Grant program for development of critical minerals and metals

(1)

Establishment

The Secretary of Commerce, in consultation with the Director and the Secretary of the Interior, shall establish a grant program to finance pilot projects for the development of critical minerals and metals in the United States.

(2)

Limitation on grant awards

A grant awarded under paragraph (1) may not exceed $10,000,000.

(3)

Economic viability

In awarding grants under paragraph (1), the Secretary of Commerce shall give priority to projects that the Secretary of Commerce determines are likely to be economically viable over the long term.

(4)

Secondary recovery

In awarding grants under paragraph (1), the Secretary of Commerce shall seek to award not less than 30 percent of the total amount of grants awarded during the fiscal year for projects relating to secondary recovery of critical minerals and metals.

(5)

Authorization of appropriations

There is authorized to be appropriated to the Secretary of Commerce $100,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2021 through 2024 to carry out the grant program established under paragraph (1).

(d)

Definitions

In this section:

(1)

Critical mineral; critical mineral or metal

The terms critical mineral and critical mineral or metal include any host mineral of a critical mineral (within the meaning of those terms in section 7002 of title VII of division Z of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 (Public Law 116–260)).

(2)

Secondary recovery

The term secondary recovery means the recovery of critical minerals and metals from discarded end-use products or from waste products produced during the metal refining and manufacturing process, including from mine waste piles, acid mine drainage sludge, or byproducts produced through legacy mining and metallurgy activities.

2215.

Caregiver policies

(a)

OSTP guidance

Not later than 6 months after the date of enactment of this division, the Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy, in consultation with relevant agencies, shall provide guidance to each Federal science agency to establish policies that—

(1)

apply to all—

(A)

research awards granted by such agency; and

(B)

principal investigators of such research who have caregiving responsibilities, including care for a newborn or newly adopted child and care for an immediate family member with a serious health condition; and

(2)

offer, to the extent feasible—

(A)

flexibility in timing for the initiation of approved research awards granted by such agency;

(B)

no-cost extensions of such research awards; and

(C)

grant supplements, as appropriate, to research awards to sustain research activities conducted under such awards.

(b)

Uniformity of guidance

In providing guidance under subsection (a), the Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy shall encourage, to the extent practicable, uniformity and consistency in the policies established pursuant to such guidance across all Federal science agencies.

(c)

Establishment of policies

To the extent practicable and consistent with guidance issued under subsection (a), Federal science agencies shall—

(1)

maintain or develop and implement policies for individuals described in paragraph (1)(B) of such subsection; and

(2)

broadly disseminate such policies to current and potential awardees.

(d)

Data on usage

Federal science agencies shall consider—

(1)

collecting data on the usage of the policies under subsection (c), at both institutions of higher education and Federal laboratories; and

(2)

reporting such data on an annual basis to the Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy in such form as required by the Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy.

(e)

Savings

(1)

Privacy

This section shall be carried out in accordance with all relevant privacy laws.

(2)

Institutions

This section shall not affect the grantee institution’s institutional policies.

(f)

Definition of Federal science agency

In this section, the term Federal science agency means any Federal agency with an annual extramural research expenditure of over $100,000,000.

2216.

Presidential awards

(a)

In General

The President is authorized to make Presidential Awards for Excellence in Technology and Science Research to researchers in underrepresented populations, including women and underrepresented minorities, who have demonstrated outstanding achievements in technology or science research.

(b)

Number and distribution of award recipients

If the President elects to make Presidential Awards for Excellence in Technology and Science Research under subsection (a), the President shall make no fewer than 104 Awards. In selecting researchers for the Awards, the President shall select at least 2 researchers—

(1)

from each of the States;

(2)

from the District of Columbia; and

(3)

from the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico.

(c)

Selection Procedures

The President shall carry out this section, including the establishment of the selection procedures, after consultation with the Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy and other appropriate officials of Federal agencies.

2217.

Bioeconomy Research and Development Act of 2021

(a)

Short title

This section may be cited as the Bioeconomy Research and Development Act of 2021.

(b)

Findings

The Congress makes the following findings:

(1)

Cellular and molecular processes may be used, mimicked, or redesigned to develop new products, processes, and systems that improve societal well-being, strengthen national security, and contribute to the economy.

(2)

Engineering biology relies on a workforce with a diverse and unique set of skills combining the biological, physical, chemical, and information sciences and engineering.

(3)

Long-term research and development is necessary to create breakthroughs in engineering biology. Such research and development requires government investment, as many of the benefits are too distant or uncertain for industry to support alone.

(4)

Research is necessary to inform evidence-based governance of engineering biology and to support the growth of the engineering biology industry.

(5)

The Federal Government has an obligation to ensure that ethical, legal, environmental, safety, security, and societal implications of its science and technology research and investment follows policies of responsible innovation and fosters public transparency.

(6)

The Federal Government can play an important role by facilitating the development of tools and technologies to further advance engineering biology, including user facilities, by facilitating public-private partnerships, by supporting risk research, and by facilitating the commercial application in the United States of research funded by the Federal Government.

(7)

The United States led the development of the science and engineering techniques that created the field of engineering biology, but due to increasing international competition, the United States is at risk of losing its competitive advantage if it does not strategically invest the necessary resources.

(8)

A National Engineering Biology Initiative can serve to establish new research directions and technology goals, improve interagency coordination and planning processes, drive technology transfer to the private sector, and help ensure optimal returns on the Federal investment.

(c)

Definitions

In this section:

(1)

Biomanufacturing

The term biomanufacturing means the utilization of biological systems to develop new and advance existing products, tools, and processes at commercial scale.

(2)

Engineering biology

The term engineering biology means the application of engineering design principles and practices to biological systems, including molecular and cellular systems, to advance fundamental understanding of complex natural systems and to enable novel or optimize functions and capabilities.

(3)

Initiative

The term Initiative means the National Engineering Biology Research and Development Initiative established under subsection (d).

(4)

Omics

The term omics refers to the collective technologies used to explore the roles, relationships, and actions of the various types of molecules that make up the cells of an organism.

(d)

National engineering biology research and development initiative

(1)

In general

The President, acting through the Office of Science and Technology Policy, shall implement a National Engineering Biology Research and Development Initiative to advance societal well-being, national security, sustainability, and economic productivity and competitiveness through—

(A)

advancing areas of research at the intersection of the biological, physical, chemical, data, and computational sciences and engineering to accelerate scientific understanding and technological innovation in engineering biology;

(B)

advancing areas of biomanufacturing research to optimize, standardize, scale, and deliver new products and solutions;

(C)

supporting social and behavioral sciences and economics research that advances the field of engineering biology and contributes to the development and public understanding of new products, processes, and technologies;

(D)

improving the understanding of engineering biology of the scientific and lay public and supporting greater evidence-based public discourse about its benefits and risks;

(E)

supporting research relating to the risks and benefits of engineering biology, including under paragraph (4);

(F)

supporting the development of novel tools and technologies to accelerate scientific understanding and technological innovation in engineering biology;

(G)

expanding the number of researchers, educators, and students and a retooled workforce with engineering biology training, including from traditionally underrepresented and underserved populations;

(H)

accelerating the translation and commercialization of engineering biology research and development by the private sector; and

(I)

improving the interagency planning and coordination of Federal Government activities related to engineering biology.

(2)

Initiative activities

The activities of the Initiative shall include—

(A)

sustained support for engineering biology research and development through—

(i)

grants to fund the work of individual investigators and teams of investigators, including interdisciplinary teams;

(ii)

projects funded under joint solicitations by a collaboration of no fewer than two agencies participating in the Initiative; and

(iii)

interdisciplinary research centers that are organized to investigate basic research questions, carry out technology development and demonstration activities, and increase understanding of how to scale up engineering biology processes, including biomanufacturing;

(B)

sustained support for databases and related tools, including—

(i)

support for curated genomics, epigenomics, and other relevant omics databases, including plant and microbial databases, that are available to researchers to carry out engineering biology research in a manner that does not compromise national security or the privacy or security of information within such databases;

(ii)

development of standards for such databases, including for curation, interoperability, and protection of privacy and security;

(iii)

support for the development of computational tools, including artificial intelligence tools, that can accelerate research and innovation using such databases; and

(iv)

an inventory and assessment of all Federal government omics databases to identify opportunities to improve the utility of such databases, as appropriate and in a manner that does not compromise national security or the privacy and security of information within such databases, and inform investment in such databases as critical infrastructure for the engineering biology research enterprise;

(C)

sustained support for the development, optimization, and validation of novel tools and technologies to enable the dynamic study of molecular processes in situ, including through—

(i)

research conducted at Federal laboratories;

(ii)

grants to fund the work of investigators at institutions of higher education and other nonprofit research institutions;

(iii)

incentivized development of retooled industrial sites across the country that foster a pivot to modernized engineering biology initiatives; and

(iv)

awards under the Small Business Innovation Research Program and the Small Business Technology Transfer Program, as described in section 9 of the Small Business Act (15 U.S.C. 638);

(D)

support for education and training of undergraduate and graduate students in engineering biology, biomanufacturing, bioprocess engineering, and computational science applied to engineering biology and in the related ethical, legal, environmental, safety, security, and other societal domains;

(E)

activities to develop robust mechanisms for documenting and quantifying the outputs and economic benefits of engineering biology; and

(F)

activities to accelerate the translation and commercialization of new products, processes, and technologies by—

(i)

identifying precompetitive research opportunities;

(ii)

facilitating public-private partnerships in engineering biology research and development;

(iii)

connecting researchers, graduate students, and postdoctoral fellows with entrepreneurship education and training opportunities; and

(iv)

supporting proof of concept activities and the formation of startup companies including through programs such as the Small Business Innovation Research Program and the Small Business Technology Transfer Program.

(3)

Expanding participation

The Initiative shall include, to the maximum extent practicable, outreach to primarily undergraduate and minority-serving institutions (and institutions of higher education with an established STEM capacity building program focused on traditionally underrepresented populations in STEM, including Native Hawaiians, Alaska Natives, and Indians) about Initiative opportunities, and shall encourage the development of research collaborations between research-intensive universities and primarily undergraduate and minority-serving institutions (and institutions of higher education with an established STEM capacity building program focused on traditionally underrepresented populations in STEM, including Native Hawaiians, Alaska Natives, and Indians).

(4)

Ethical, legal, environmental, safety, security, and societal issues

Initiative activities shall take into account ethical, legal, environmental, safety, security, and other appropriate societal issues by—

(A)

supporting research, including in the social sciences, and other activities addressing ethical, legal, environmental, and other appropriate societal issues related to engineering biology, including integrating research on such topics with the research and development in engineering biology, and encouraging the dissemination of the results of such research, including through interdisciplinary engineering biology research centers described in paragraph (2)(A)(iii);

(B)

supporting research and other activities related to the safety and security implications of engineering biology, including outreach to increase awareness among Federal researchers and Federally-funded researchers at institutions of higher education about potential safety and security implications of engineering biology research, as appropriate;

(C)

ensuring that input from Federal and non-Federal experts on the ethical, legal, environmental, safety, security, and other appropriate societal issues related to engineering biology is integrated into the Initiative;

(D)

ensuring, through the agencies and departments that participate in the Initiative, that public input and outreach are integrated into the Initiative by the convening of regular and ongoing public discussions through mechanisms such as workshops, consensus conferences, and educational events, as appropriate; and

(E)

complying with all applicable provisions of Federal law.

(e)

Initiative coordination

(1)

Interagency committee

The President, acting through the Office of Science and Technology Policy, shall designate an interagency committee to coordinate activities of the Initiative as appropriate, which shall be co-chaired by the Office of Science and Technology Policy, and include representatives from the Foundation, the Department of Energy, the Department of Defense, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Department of Agriculture, the Department of Health and Human Services, the Bureau of Economic Analysis, and any other agency that the President considers appropriate (in this section referred to as the Interagency Committee). The Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy shall select an additional co-chairperson from among the members of the Interagency Committee. The Interagency Committee shall oversee the planning, management, and coordination of the Initiative. The Interagency Committee shall—

(A)

provide for interagency coordination of Federal engineering biology research, development, and other activities undertaken pursuant to the Initiative;

(B)

establish and periodically update goals and priorities for the Initiative;

(C)

develop, not later than 12 months after the date of the enactment of this division, and update every 3 years thereafter, a strategic plan submitted to the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology and the Committee on Energy and Commerce of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation and the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions of the Senate that—

(i)

guides the activities of the Initiative for purposes of meeting the goals and priorities established under (and updated pursuant to) subparagraph (B); and

(ii)

describes—

(I)

the Initiative’s support for long-term funding for interdisciplinary engineering biology research and development;

(II)

the Initiative’s support for education and public outreach activities;

(III)

the Initiative’s support for research and other activities on ethical, legal, environmental, safety, security, and other appropriate societal issues related to engineering biology including—

(aa)

an applied biorisk management research plan;

(bb)

recommendations for integrating security into biological data access and international reciprocity agreements;

(cc)

recommendations for manufacturing restructuring to support engineering biology research, development, and scaling-up initiatives; and

(dd)

an evaluation of existing biosecurity governance policies, guidance, and directives for the purposes of creating an adaptable, evidence-based framework to respond to emerging biosecurity challenges created by advances in engineering biology;

(IV)

how the Initiative will contribute to moving results out of the laboratory and into application for the benefit of society and United States competitiveness; and

(V)

how the Initiative will measure and track the contributions of engineering biology to United States economic growth and other societal indicators;

(D)

develop a national genomic sequencing strategy to ensure engineering biology research fully leverages plant, animal, and microbe biodiversity, as appropriate and in a manner that does not compromise national security or the privacy or security of human genetic information, to enhance long-term innovation and competitiveness in engineering biology in the United States;

(E)

develop a plan to utilize Federal programs, such as the Small Business Innovation Research Program and the Small Business Technology Transfer Program as described in section 9 of the Small Business Act (15 U.S.C. 638), in support of the activities described in subsection (d)(2)(C); and

(F)

in carrying out this subsection, take into consideration the recommendations of the advisory committee established under subsection (f), the results of the workshop convened under subsection (d)(4)(D), existing reports on related topics, and the views of academic, State, industry, and other appropriate groups.

(2)

Triennial report

Beginning with fiscal year 2022 and ending in fiscal year 2028, not later than 90 days after submission of the President’s annual budget request and every third fiscal year thereafter, the Interagency Committee shall prepare and submit to the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the Senate a report that includes—

(A)

a summarized agency budget in support of the Initiative for the fiscal year to which such budget request applies, for the following 2 fiscal years, for the then current fiscal year, including a breakout of spending for each agency participating in the Program, and for the development and acquisition of any research facilities and instrumentation; and

(B)

an assessment of how Federal agencies are implementing the plan described in paragraph (1)(C), including—

(i)

a description of the amount and number of awards made under the Small Business Innovation Research Program and the Small Business Technology Transfer Program (as described in section 9 of the Small Business Act (15 U.S.C. 638)) in support of the Initiative;

(ii)

a description of the amount and number of projects funded under joint solicitations by a collaboration of no fewer than 2 agencies participating in the Initiative; and

(iii)

a description of the effect of the newly funded projects by the Initiative.

(3)

Initiative office

(A)

In general

The President shall establish an Initiative Coordination Office, with a Director and full-time staff, which shall—

(i)

provide technical and administrative support to the interagency committee and the advisory committee established under subsection (f);

(ii)

serve as the point of contact on Federal engineering biology activities for government organizations, academia, industry, professional societies, State governments, interested citizen groups, and others to exchange technical and programmatic information;

(iii)

oversee interagency coordination of the Initiative, including by encouraging and supporting joint agency solicitation and selection of applications for funding of activities under the Initiative, as appropriate;

(iv)

conduct public outreach, including dissemination of findings and recommendations of the advisory committee established under subsection (f), as appropriate;

(v)

serve as the coordinator of ethical, legal, environmental, safety, security, and other appropriate societal input; and

(vi)

promote access to, and early application of, the technologies, innovations, and expertise derived from Initiative activities to agency missions and systems across the Federal Government, and to United States industry, including startup companies.

(B)

Funding

The Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy, in coordination with each participating Federal department and agency, as appropriate, shall develop and annually update an estimate of the funds necessary to carry out the activities of the Initiative Coordination Office and submit such estimate with an agreed summary of contributions from each agency to Congress as part of the President’s annual budget request to Congress.

(C)

Termination

The Initiative Coordination Office established under this paragraph shall terminate on the date that is 10 years after the date of the enactment of this Act.

(4)

Rule of construction

Nothing in this subsection shall be construed to alter the policies, processes, or practices of individual Federal agencies in effect on the day before the date of the enactment of this division relating to the conduct of biomedical research and advanced development, including the solicitation and review of extramural research proposals.

(f)

Advisory committee

(1)

In general

The agency co-chair of the interagency committee established in subsection (e) shall, in consultation with the Office of Science and Technology Policy, designate or establish an advisory committee on engineering biology research and development (in this subsection referred to as the advisory committee) to be composed of not fewer than 12 members, including representatives of research and academic institutions, industry, and nongovernmental entities, who are qualified to provide advice on the Initiative.

(2)

Assessment

The advisory committee shall assess—

(A)

the current state of United States competitiveness in engineering biology, including the scope and scale of United States investments in engineering biology research and development in the international context;

(B)

current market barriers to commercialization of engineering biology products, processes, and tools in the United States;

(C)

progress made in implementing the Initiative;

(D)

the need to revise the Initiative;

(E)

the balance of activities and funding across the Initiative;

(F)

whether the strategic plan developed or updated by the interagency committee established under subsection (e) is helping to maintain United States leadership in engineering biology;

(G)

the management, coordination, implementation, and activities of the Initiative; and

(H)

whether ethical, legal, environmental, safety, security, and other appropriate societal issues are adequately addressed by the Initiative.

(3)

Reports

Beginning not later than 2 years after the date of enactment of this division, and not less frequently than once every 3 years thereafter, the advisory committee shall submit to the President, the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology of the House of Representatives, and the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the Senate, a report on—

(A)

the findings of the advisory committee’s assessment under paragraph (2); and

(B)

the advisory committee’s recommendations for ways to improve the Initiative.

(4)

Application of federal advisory committee act

Section 14 of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (5 U.S.C. App.) shall not apply to the advisory committee.

(5)

Termination

The advisory committee established under paragraph (1) shall terminate on the date that is 10 years after the date of the enactment of this Act.

(g)

External review of ethical, legal, environmental, safety, security, and societal issues

(1)

In general

Not later than 6 months after the date of enactment of this division, the Director shall seek to enter into an agreement with the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine to conduct a review, and make recommendations with respect to, the ethical, legal, environmental, safety, security, and other appropriate societal issues related to engineering biology research and development. The review shall include—

(A)

an assessment of the current research on such issues;

(B)

a description of the research gaps relating to such issues;

(C)

recommendations on how the Initiative can address the research needs identified pursuant to subparagraph (B); and

(D)

recommendations on how researchers engaged in engineering biology can best incorporate considerations of ethical, legal, environmental, safety, security, and other societal issues into the development of research proposals and the conduct of research.

(2)

Report to congress

The agreement entered into under paragraph (1) shall require the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine to, not later than 2 years after the date of the enactment of this division—

(A)

submit to the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the Senate a report containing the findings and recommendations of the review conducted under paragraph (1); and

(B)

make a copy of such report available on a publicly accessible website.

(h)

Agency activities

(1)

National science foundation

As part of the Initiative, the Foundation shall—

(A)

support basic research in engineering biology through individual grants, collaborative grants, and through interdisciplinary research centers;

(B)

support research on the environmental, legal, ethical, and social implications of engineering biology;

(C)

provide support for research instrumentation for engineering biology disciplines, including support for research, development, optimization and validation of novel technologies to enable the dynamic study of molecular processes in situ;

(D)

support curriculum development and research experiences for secondary, undergraduate, and graduate students in engineering biology and biomanufacturing; and

(E)

award grants, on a competitive basis, to enable institutions to support graduate students and postdoctoral fellows who perform some of their engineering biology research in an industry setting.

(2)

Department of Commerce

(A)

National Institute of Standards and Technology

As part of the Initiative, the Director of the National Institute of Standards and Technology shall—

(i)

establish a bioscience research program to advance the development of standard reference materials and measurements and to create new data tools, techniques, and processes necessary to advance engineering biology and biomanufacturing;

(ii)

provide access to user facilities with advanced or unique equipment, services, materials, and other resources to industry, institutions of higher education, nonprofit organizations, and government agencies to perform research and testing; and

(iii)

provide technical expertise to inform the potential development of guidelines or safeguards for new products, processes, and systems of engineering biology.

(B)

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

As part of the initiative, the Administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration shall—

(i)

establish a program to conduct and support omics research and associated bioinformatic sciences to increase efficiency and promote a sustainable bioeconomy (blue economy) to develop the next generation of tools and products to improve ecosystem stewardship, monitoring, management, assessments, and forecasts; and

(ii)

collaborate with other agencies to understand potential environmental threats and safeguards relating to engineering biology.

(3)

Department of energy

As part of the Initiative, the Secretary of Energy shall—

(A)

conduct and support research, development, demonstration, and commercial application activities in engineering biology, including in the areas of synthetic biology, advanced biofuel development, biobased materials, and environmental remediation;

(B)

support the development, optimization and validation of novel, scalable tools and technologies to enable the dynamic study of molecular processes in situ; and

(C)

provide access to user facilities with advanced or unique equipment, services, materials, and other resources, including secure access to high-performance computing, as appropriate, to industry, institutions of higher education, nonprofit organizations, and government agencies to perform research and testing.

(4)

Department of defense

As part of the Initiative, the Secretary of Defense shall—

(A)

conduct and support research and development in engineering biology and associated data and information sciences;

(B)

support curriculum development and research experiences in engineering biology and associated data and information sciences across the military education system, to include service academies, professional military education, and military graduate education; and

(C)

assess risks of potential national security and economic security threats relating to engineering biology.

(5)

National aeronautics and space administration

As part of the Initiative, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration shall—

(A)

conduct and support basic and applied research in engineering biology, including in synthetic biology, and related to Earth and space sciences, aeronautics, space technology, and space exploration and experimentation, consistent with the priorities established