< Back to H.R. 9118 (87th Congress, 1961–1962)

Text of the An Act to establish a U.S. Arms Control Agency

This bill was enacted on September 26, 1961. The text of the bill below is as of Sep 26, 1961 (Passed Congress/Enrolled Bill).

75   STAT.]         PUBLIC LAW 87-297-SEPT. 26, 1961                                            631

Public Law 87-297
                                     AN A C T                                     September 26, 1961
                                                                                     TH R 91 181
        To establish a United States Arms Control and Disaruiament Agency.            ' • ' • ' '
 Be it enacted hy the Seiiate mid House of Representatives               of the
United States of America in Congress assembled,
TITLE I—SHORT TITLE, PURPOSE, AND DEFINITIONS
                                  SHORT TITI^E

  SECTION 1. This Act may be cited as the "Arms Control and Dis- Di^^a^^,^°AcT'^
armament Act".
                                    PURPOSE

   SEC. 2. An ultimate goal of the United States is a world which is free
from the scourge of w^ar and the dangers and burdens of armaments;
in which the use of force has been subordinated to the rule of law; and
in which international adjustments to a changing world are achieved
peacefully. I t is the purpose of this Act to provide impetus toward
this goal by creating a new agency of peace to deal with the problem
of reduction and control of armaments looking toward ultimate world
disarmament.
   Arms control and disarmament policy, being an important aspect
of foreign policy, must be consistent with national security policy as
a whole. The formulation and implementation of United States arms
control and disarmament policy in a manner which will promote the
national security can best be insured by a central organization charged
by statute with primary responsibility for this field. This organiza-
tion must have such a position within the Government that it can
provide the President, the Secretary of State, other officials of the
executive branch, and the Congress with recommendations concerning
United States arms control and disarmament policy, and can assess
the effect of these recommendations upon our foreign policies, our
national security policies, and our economy.
   This organization must have the capacity to provide the essential
scientific, economic, political, military, psychological, and technologi-
cal information upon which realistic arms control and disarmament
policy must be based. It must be able to carry out the following pri-
mary functions:
        (a) The conduct, support, and coordination of research for
     arms control and disarmament policy formulation;
        (b) T h e preparation for and management of United States
     participation in international negotiations in the arms control
     and disarmament field;
        (c) The dissemination and coordination of public information
     concerning arms control and disarmament; and
         (d) The preparation for, operation of, or as appropriate,
     direction of United States participation in such control systems
     as may become part of United States arms control and disarma-
     ment activities.

                                  DEFINITIONS
     SEC. 3. As used in this Act—
          (a) The terms "arms control" and "disarmament" mean the
       identification, verification, inspection, limitation, control, reduc-
       tion, or elimination, of armed forces and armaments of all kinds
       under international agreement including the necessary steps taken
       under such an agreement to establish an effective sytem of inter-

632 PUBLIC LAW 87-297-SEPT. 26, 1961 [75 S T A T . national control, or to create and strengthen international organi- zations for the maintenance of peace. (b) The term "Government agency" means any executive depart- ment, commission, agency, independent establishment, corporation wholly or partly owned by the United States which is an instru- mentality of the United States, or any board, bureau, division, service, office, officer, authority, administration, or other establish- ment in the executive branch of Government. (c) The term "Agency" means the United States Arms Control and Disarmament Agency. T I T L E II—ORGANIZATION UNITED STATES ARMS CONTROL AND DISARMAMENT AGENCY a ^^*^*'"''""*"* °' SEC. 21. I'here is hereby established an agency to be known as the "United States Arms Control and Disarmament Agency". DIRECTOR SEC. 22. The Agency shall be headed by a Director, who shall serve as the principal adviser to the Secretary of State and the President on arms control and disarmament matters. I n carrying out his duties under this Act the Director shallj under the direction of the Secretary of State, have primary responsibility within the Government for arms control and disarmament matters, as defined in this Act. He shall be appointed by the President, by and Avith the advice and consent of the Senate. He shall receive compensation at the rate of $22,500 per annum. D E P U T Y DIRECTOR SEC. 23. A Deputy Director of the Agency shall be appointed by the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate. H e shall receive compensation at the rate of $21,500 per annum. The Deputy Director shall perform such duties and exercise such powers as the Director may prescribe. He shall act for, and exercise the powers of, the Director during his absence or disability or during a vacancy in said office. ASSISTANT DIRECTORS SEC. 24. Not to exceed four Assistant Directors may be appointed by the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate. They shall receive compensation at the rate of $20,000 per annum. They shall perform such duties and exercise such powers as the Director may prescribe. B U R E A U S , OFFICES, AND DIVISIONS SEC. 25. The Director, under the direction of the Secretary of State, may establish within the Agency such bureaus, offices, and divisions as he may determine to be necessary to discharge his responsibilities under this Act, including, but not limited to, an Office of the General Counsel. GENERAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE SEC. 26. The President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, may appoint a General Advisory Committee of not to exceed fifteen members to advise the Director on arms control and disar- mament policy and activities. The President shall designate one of the members as Chairman. The members of the committee may receive the compensation and reimbursement for expenses specified for
75 S T A T . ] PUBLIC LAW 8 7 - 2 9 7 - S E P T . 26, 1961 633 consultants by section 41(d) of this Act. Tlie Committee shall meet at least twice each year. It shall from time to time advise the President, the Secretary of State, and the Disarmament Director respecting matters affecting arms control, disarmament, and world peace. TITLE III—FUNCTIONS RESEARCH SEC. 31. The Director is authorized and directed to exercise his powers in such manner as to insure the acquisition of a fund of theoretical and practical knowledge concerning disarmament. To this end, the Director is authorized and directed, under the direction of the President, (1) to insure the conduct of research, development, and other studies in the field of arms control and disarmament; (2) to make arrangements (including contracts, agreements, and grants) for the conduct of research, development, and other studies in the field of arms control and disarmament by private or public institu- tions or persons; and (3) to coordinate the research, development, and other studies conducted in the field of arms control and disarmament by or for other Government agencies in accordance with procedures established under section 35 of this Act. In carrying out his responsi- bilities under this Act, the Director shall, to the maximum extent feasible, make full use of available facilities, Government and private. The authority of the Director with respect to research, development, and other studies shall be limited to participation in the following insofar as they relate to arms control and disarmament: (a) the detection, identification, inspection, monitoring, limita- tion, reduction, control, and elimination of armed forces and armaments, including thermonuclear, nuclear, missile, conven- tional, bacteriological, chemical, and radiological weapons; (b) the techniques and systems of detecting, identifying, in- specting, and monitoring of tests of nuclear, thermonuclear, and other weapons; (c) the analysis of national budgets, levels of industrial pro- duction, and economic indicators to determine the amounts spent by various countries for armaments; (d) the control, reduction, and elimination of armed forces and armaments in space, in areas on and beneath the earth's surface, and in underwater regions; (e) the structure and operation of international control and other organizations useful for arms control and disarmament; (f) the training of scientists, technicians, and other personnel for manning the control systems which may be created by interna- tional arms control and disarmament agreements; (g) the reduction and elimination of the danger of war resulting from accident, miscalculation, or possible surprise attack, includ- ing (but not limited to) improvements in the methods of communi- cations between nations; (h) the economic and political consequences of arms control and disarmament, including the problems of readjustment arising in industry and the reallocation of national resources; (i) the arms control and disarmament implications of foreign and national security policies of the United States with a view to a better understanding of the significance of such policies for the * achievement of arms control and disarmament; (j) the national security and foreign policy implications of arms control and disarmament proposals with a view to a better understanding of the effect of such proposals upon national security and foreign policy; 64207 0-62—43
634 PUBLIC LAW 87-297-SEPT. 26, 1961 [75 STAT. (k) methods for the maintenance of peace and security during different stages of arms control and disarmament; (1) the scientific, economic, political, legal, social, psychological, military, and technological factors related to the prevention of war with a view to a better understanding of how the basic structure of a lasting peace may be established; (m) such related problems as the Director may determine to be in need of research, development, or study in order to carry out the provisions of this Act. PATENTS SEC. 32. All research within the United States contracted for, sponsored, cosponsored, or authorized under authority of this Act, shall be provided for in such manner that all information as to uses, products, processes, patents, and other developments resulting from such research developed by Government expenditure will (with such exceptions and limitations, if any, as the Director may find to be necessary in the public interest) be available to the general public. This subsection shall not be so construed as to deprive the owner of any background patent relating thereto of such rights as he may have thereunder. POLICY FORMULATION" SEC. 33. The Director is authorized and directed to prepare for the President, the Secretary of State, and the heads of such other Govern- ment agencies, as the President may determine, recommendations con- cerning United States arms control and disarmament policy: Provided^ however. That no action shall be taken under this or any other law (hat will obligate the United States to disarm or to reduce or to limit the Armed Forces or armaments of the United States, except pursuant use prec. title i.'to the treaty making power of the President under the Constitution or unless authorized oy further affirmative legislation by the Congress of the United States. NEGOTIATIONS AND RELATED FUNCTIONS SEC. 34. Under the direction of the Secretary of State— (a) the Director, for the purpose of conducting negotiations con- cerning arms control and disarmament or for the purpose of exer- cising any other authority given him by this Act, may (1) consult and communicate with or direct the consultation and communi- cation with representatives of other nations or of international organizations and (2) communicate in the name of the Secretary with diplomatic representatives of the United States in this coun- try and abroad. (b) the Director shall perform functions pursuant to section Vv^s^c^\33z-is ^(^) ^^ Reorganization Plan 8 of 1953 with respect to providing note. to the United States Information Agency official United States positions and policy on arms control and disarmament matters for dissemination abroad. (c) the Director is authorized (1) to formulate plans and make preparations for the establishment, operation, and funding of inspection and control systems which may become part of the United States arms control and disarmament activities, and (2) as authorized by law, to put into effect, direct, or otherwise assume United States responsibility for such systems.
75 S T A T . ] PUBLIC LAW 8 7 - 2 9 7 - S E P T . 26, 1961 635 COORDINATION SEC. 35. The President is authorized to establish procedures to (1) assure cooperation, consultation, and a continuing exchange of in- formation between the Agency and the Department of DefjMise, the ^ Atomic Energy Commission, the National Aeronautics stnd Space Administration and other affected Government agencies, in all signifi- cant aspects of United States arms control and disarmament policy and related matters, including current and prospective policies, plans, and programs, (2) resolve differences of opinion between the Director and such other agencies which cannot be resolved through consultation, and (3) provide for presentation to the President of recommendations of the Director with respect to such differences, when such differences involve major matters of policy and cannot be resolved through consultation. TITLE IV—GENERAL PROVISIONS GENERAL A U T H O R I T Y SEC. 41. In the performance of his functions, the Director is author- ized to— (a) utilize or employ the services, personnel, equipment, or facilities of any other Government agency, with the consent of the agency concerned, to perform such functions on behalf of the Agency as may appear desirable. I t is the intent of this section that the Director rely upon the Department of State for general administrative services in the Ignited States and abroad to the extent agreed upon between the Secretary of State and the Director. Any Government agency is authorized, notwithstand- ing any other provision of law, to transfer to or to receive from the Director, without reimbursement, supplies and equipment other than administrative supplies or equipment. Transfer or receipt of excess property shall be in accordance with the provisions of the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949, " fr^X\iV- T 1 -"^ •' ' 4 0 u s e 471 n o t e . as amended; (b) appoint officers and employees, including attorneys, for the Agency in accordance with the civil service laws and fix their compensation in accordance with the Classification Act of 1949, 63 stat. 9S4. as amended; s use 1071 note. (c) enter into agreements with other Government agencies, in- cluding the military departments through the Secretary of De- fense, under which officers or employees of such agencies may be detailed to the Agency for the performance of service pursuant to this Act without prejudice to the status or advancement of such officers or employees within their own agencies; (d) procure services of experts and consultants or organiza- tions thereof, including stenographic reporting services, as authorized by section 15 of the Act of August 2, 1946 (5 U . S . C 55a), at rates not to exceed $100 per diem for individuals, and ^° ^*®'- ''^°- to pay in connection therewith travel expenses of individuals, in- cluding transportation and per diem in lieu of subsistence while away from their homes or regular places of business, as author- ized by section 5 of said Act, as amended (5 TT.S.C. 73b-2) : 34^"'®' ^^- ^^^' Prov/ded, That no such individual shall be employed for more than one hundred days in any fiscal year unless tlie President certifies that employment of such individual in excess of such number of days is necessary in the national interest: And pro- vided further, That such contracts may be renewed annually;
PUBLIC LAW 87-297-SEPT. 26, 1961 [75 S T A T . (e) employ individuals of outstanding ability without com- pensation in accordance with the provisions of section 710(b) of the Defense Production Act of 1950, as amended (50 U.S.C. App. 69 Stat. 582. 2160), and regulations issued thereunder; (f) establish advisory boards to advise with and make recom- mendations to the Director on United States arms control and disarmament policy and activities. The members of such boards may receive the compensation and reimbursement for expenses specified for consultants by section 41(d) of this A c t ; (g) delegate, as appropriate, to the Deputy Director or other officers of the Agency, any authority conferred upon the Director by the provisions of this Act; and (h) make, promulgate, issue, rescind, and amend such rules and regulations as may be necessary or desirable to the exercise of a n j authority conferred upon the Director by the provisions of this Act. FOREIGN SERVICE RESERVE AND STAFF OFFICERS SEC. 42. The Secretary of State may authorize the Director to exer- cise, with respect to Foreign Service Reserve officers and Foreign Serv- ice Staff officers and employees appointed or employed for the Agency, the following authority: (1) The authority available to the Secretary 22 use 80?note. ^^ ^^^{^ "^^^F ^^^ Foreign Service Act of 1946, as amended, (2) the authority available to the Secretary under any other provision of law pertaining specifically, or generally applicable, to such officers or em- })loyees, and (3) the authority of the Board of Foreign Service pur- suant to the Foreign Service Act of 1946, as amended. C O N T R A C T S OR EXPENDITURES SEC. 43. The President may, in advance, exempt actions of the Director from the provisions of law relating to contracts or expendi- tures of Government funds whenever he determines that such action is essential in the interest of United States arms control and disarma- ment and security policy. CONFLICT OF INTEREST AND DUAL COMPENSATION LAWS SEC. 44. The members of the General Advisory Committee created by section 26 of this Act, and the members of the advisory boards, the consultants, and the individuals of outstanding ability employed without compensation, all of which are provided in section 41 of this Act, may serve as such without regard to the provisions of section 62 Stat. 697. 281, 283, 284 or 1914 of title 18 of the United States Code, or of sec- tion 190 of the Revised Statutes (5 U.S.C. 99), or of any other Fed- eral law imposing restrictions, requirements, or penalties in relation to the employment of individuals, the performance of services, or the payment or receipt of compensation in connection with any claim, proceeding, or matter involving the United States Government, except insofar as such provisions of law may prohibit any such individual from receiving compensation from a source other than a nonprofit educational institution in respect of any particular matter in which the Agency is directly interested. Nor shall such service be con- sidered as employment or holding of office or position bringing such individual within the provisions of section 13 of the Civil Service 70 Stat. 757. Retirement Act (5 U.S.C. 2263), section 212 of the Act of June 30, 47 Stat. 406; 69 1932, as amended (5 U.S.C. 59a), or any other Federal law limiting Stat. 498. ^^^ reemployment of retired officers or employees or governing the simultaneous receipt of compensation and retired pay or annuities.
75 S T A T . ] PUBLIC LAW 8 7 - 2 9 7 - S E P T . 26, 1961 637 SECURITY REQUIREMENTS SEC. 45. (a) The Director shall establish such security and loyalty requirements, restrictions, and safeguards as he deems necessary in the interest of the national security and to carry out the provisions of'this Act. The Director shall arrange with the Civil Service Commission for the conduct of full-field background security and loyalty investiga- tions of all the Agency's officers, employees, consultants, persons de- tailed from other Government agencies, members of its General Ad- visory Committee, advisory boards, contractors and subcontractors, and their officers and employees, actual or prospective. I n the event the investigation discloses information indicating that the person in- vestigated may be or may become a security risk, or may be of doubtful loyalty, the report of the investigation shall be turned over to the Federal Bureau of Investigation for a full-field investigation. The final results of all such investigations shall be turned over to the Director for final determination. No person shall be permitted to enter on duty as sucli an officer, employee, consultant, or member of advisory committee or board, or pursuant to any such detail, and no contractor or subcontractor, or officer or employee thereof shall be permitted to have access to any classified information, until he shall have been investigated in accordance with this subsection and the report of such investigations made to the Director, and the Director shall have determined that such person is not a security risk or of doubtful loyalty. Standards applicable with respect to the security clearance of persons within any category referred to in this subsection shall not be less stringent, and the investigation of such persons for such purposes shall not be less intensive or complete, than in the case of such clearance of persons in a corresponding category under the security procedures of the Government agency or agencies having the highest security restrictions witli respect to persons in such category. (b) The Atomic Energy Commission may authorize any of its employees, or employees of any contractor, prospective contractor, licensee, or prospective licensee of the Atomic Energy Commission or any other person authorized to have access to Restricted Data by the Atomic Energy Commission under section 2165 of title 42, to permit es stat. 942. the Director or any officer, employee, consultant, person detailed from other Government agencies, member of the General Advisory Commit- tee or of an advisory board established pursuant to section 41(f), contractor, subcontractor, prospective contractor, or prospective sub- contractor, or officer or employee of such contractor, subcontractor, prospective contractor, or prospective subcontractor, to have access to Restricted Data which is required in the performance of his duties and so certified by the Director, but only if (1) ^^^ Atomic Energy Com- mission has determined, in accordance with the established personnel security procedures and standards of the Commission, that permitting such individual to have access to such Restricted Data will not endan- ger the common defense and security, and (2) the Atomic Energy Commission finds that the established personnel and other security procedures and standards of the Agency are adequate and in reasonable conformity to the standards established by the Atomic Energy Com- mission under section 2165 of title 42, including those for mterim clearance in subsection (b) thereof. Any individual granted access to such Restricted Data pursuant to this subsection may exchange such data with any individual who (A) is an officer or employee of the Department of Defense, or any department or agency thereof, or a member of the Armed Forces, or an officer or employee of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, or a contractor or subcontrac-
^38 PUBLIC LAW 87-297-SEPT. 26, 1961 [75 S T A T , tor of any such department, agency, or armed force, or an officer or employee of any such contractor or subcontractor, and (B) has been authorized to have access to Restricted Data under the provisions of 68 Stat. 941; 72 gectious 2163 or 2455 of title 42. Stat. 433. COMPTROLLEK GENERAL AUDIT SEC. 46. No moneys appropriated for the purpose of this Act shall be available for payment under any contract with the Director, negotiated without advertising, except contracts with any foreign government, international organization or any agency thereof, unless such contract inchides a clause to the effect that the Comptroller General of the United States or any of his duly authorized representa- tives shall, until the expiration of three years after final payment, have access to and the right to examine any directly pertinent books, documents, papers, and records of the contractor or any of his subcon- tractors engaged in the performance of, and involving transactions related to such contracts or subcontracts: Provided^ Iwwever^ That no moneys so appropriated shall be available for payment under such contract which includes any provisions precluding an audit by the General Accounting Office of any transaction under such contract: And provided further^ That nothing in this section shall preclude the earlier disposal of contractor and subcontractor records in accordance with records disposal schedules agreed upon between the Director and the General Accounting Office. TRANSFER O F ACTIVITIES A N D F A C I L I T I E S TO AGENCY SEC. 47. (a) The United States Disarmament Administration, together with its records, property, personnel, and funds, is hereby transferred to the Agency. The appropriations and unexpended balances of appropriations transferred pursuant to this subsection shall be available for expenditure for any and all objects of expendi- ture autliorized by this Act, without regard to the requirements of 64 Stat. 765. apportionment under section 665 of title 31. (b) The President, by Executive order, may transfer to the Director any activities or facilities of any Government agency which relate primarily to arms control and disarmament. In connection with any such transfer, the President may under this section or other applicable authority, provide for appropriate transfers of records, property, civilian personnel, and funds. No transfer shall be made under this C o n g r e s s i o n a l subsection until (1) a full and complete report concerning the nature approval. and effect of such proposed transfer has been transmitted by the President to the Congress, and (2) the first period of sixty calendar days of regular session of the Congress following the date of receipt of such report by the Congress has expired without adoption by either House of the Congress of a resolution stating that such House does not favor such transfer. The procedures prescribed in title I I of the " u s e ' 1332-10- Reorganization Act of 1949 shall apply to any such resolution. 133Z-15. U S E OF F U N D S S E C 48. Appropriations made to the Director for the purposes of this Act, and transfers of funds to him by other Government agencies for such purposes, shall be available to him to exercise any authority granted him by this Act, including, without limitation, expenses of printing and binding without regard to the provisions of section 11 of the Act of March 1, 1919 (44 U.S.C. I l l ) ; purchase or hire of one passenger motor vehicle for the official use of the Director without 60 Stat. 810. regard to the limitations contained in section 78(c) of title 6 of the
75 S T A T . ] PUBLIC LAW 87-298-SEPT. 26, 1961 639 United States Code; entertainment and official courtesies to the extent authorized by appropriation; expenditures for training and study; expenditures in connection with participation in international con- ferences for the purposes of this Act; and expenses in connection with travel of personnel outside the Uliited States, including transporta- tion expenses of dependents, household goods, and personal effects, and expenses authorized by the Foreign Service Act of 1946, as ^° fiir'^^^^r amended, not otherwise provided for. 22 u s e 801 note. APPROPRIATION SEC. 49. (a) There are hereby authorized to be appropriated not to exceed $10,000,000 to remain available until expended, to carry out the purposes of this Act. (b) Funds appropriated pursuant to this section may be allocated or transferred to any agency for carrying out the purposes of this Act. Such funds shall be available for obligation and expenditure in ac- cordance with authority granted in this Act, or under authority gov- erning the activities of the agencies to which such funds are allocated or transferred. REPORT TO CONGRESS SEC. 50. The Director shall submit to the President, for transmittal to the Congress, not later than January 31 of each year, a report concerning activities of the Agency. Approved September 26, 1961, 12:45 p.m. Public Law 87-298 • ^ •^^'^ September 26, 1961 To authorize the use of funds arising from judgments in favor of any of the Con- [H. R. 8236] federated Tribes of the Oolville Reservation. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America, in Congress assembled, That the funds on ^o/^^f; Reser- deposit in the Treasury of the United States to the credit of the Col- vation. ville Tribe, San Poeils-Nespelem Tribe, Okanogan Tribe, Methow Tribes. Confederated Tribe, and Lake Tribe (certain constituent groups of the Confeder- ated Tribes of the Colville Reservation) that were appropriated to pay a judgment of the Indian Claims Commission dated March 1, 1960, in docket numbered 181, and the funds which may be deposited in the Treasury of the United States to the credit of the said con- stituent groups or any other constituent groups of the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation to pay any judgments arising out of proceedings presently pending before the Indian Claims Commis- sion in dockets numbered 161, 179,181-A, 181-B, 181-C, 222, and 224, and the interest on said judgments, after payment of attorney fees and expenses, shall be credited to the account of the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, and may be advanced or expended for any purpose that is authorized by the tribal governing body of the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation and approved by the Secretary of the Interior. Any part of such funds that may be distributed per capita to the members of the tribes shall not be subject to Federal or State income tax. Approved September 26, 1961.