H.J.Res. 697 (93rd): Joint resolution proposing an amendment to the Constitution of the United States relating to the strengthening of the system of checks and balances between the legislative and executive branches of the Government as envisioned by the Constitution with respect to the enactment and execution of the laws and the accountability to the people of the executive as well as the legislative branches of the Government.

Introduced:
Aug 01, 1973 (93rd Congress, 1973–1974)
Status:
Died (Referred to Committee) in a previous session of Congress
See Instead:

H.J.Res. 708 (same title)
Referred to Committee — Aug 03, 1973

This resolution was introduced on August 1, 1973, in a previous session of Congress, but was not enacted.

Introduced
Aug 01, 1973
 
Sponsor
David “Dave” Obey
Representative for Wisconsin's 7th congressional district
Party
Democrat
Related Bills
H.J.Res. 708 (identical)

Referred to Committee
Last Action: Aug 03, 1973

 
Summary

No summaries available.

 
Cosponsors
none
Committees

House Judiciary

The committee chair determines whether a resolution will move past the committee stage.

 
Primary Source

THOMAS.gov (The Library of Congress)

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Notes

H.J.Res. stands for House joint resolution.

A joint resolution is often used in the same manner as a bill. If passed by both the House and Senate in identical form and signed by the president, it becomes a law. Joint resolutions are also used to propose amendments to the Constitution.

The resolution’s title was written by its sponsor.

GovTrack’s Bill Summary

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Library of Congress Summary

The summary below was written by the Congressional Research Service, which is a nonpartisan division of the Library of Congress.


8/1/1973--Introduced.
Constitutional Amendment - States that there shall be such power vested in the Congress of the United States that upon enactment by two-thirds of the Senate and the House of Representatives present of a joint resolution that the President has failed or refused faithfully to execute the laws enacted by Congress; or that he has willfully exceeded the powers vested in him by this Constitution and the laws of the United States; or that he has caused or willfully permitted the rights of citizens of the United States to be trespassed upon in violation of this Constitution, the laws of the United States, or treaties made, or which shall be made, under their authority; the Congress shall by legislation enact a law which shall be excluded from the provisions enumerated in Article I, section 7 of this Constitution requiring presentation to and signature by the President of all laws by Congress; provide for a special election for President and Vice President of the United States, such special election to be held within ninety days from the date of the enactment of the joint resolution.
Requires that such special election shall be by direct popular vote of the registered voters of the several States. Provides that the special election shall be held pursuant to law enacted by Congress and necessary campaign funds and allied expenses of the political parties participating in such special election shall be financed exclusively from the funds which the Congress shall appropriate.
Permits the incumbent President and Vice President to be eligible for renomination as candidates of their respective political party for reelection; and, if reelected, shall be considered as continuing to fulfill the term of office for which orginally serving.

House Republican Conference Summary

The summary below was written by the House Republican Conference, which is the caucus of Republicans in the House of Representatives.


No summary available.

House Democratic Caucus Summary

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