H.R. 5615 (96th): Intelligence Identities Protection Act

Introduced:
Oct 17, 1979 (96th Congress, 1979–1980)
Status:
Died (Referred to Committee)
See Instead:

H.R. 6084 (same title)
Referred to Committee — Dec 11, 1979

Sponsor
Edward Boland
Representative for Massachusetts's 2nd congressional district
Party
Democrat
Related Bills
H.R. 6084 (identical)

Referred to Committee
Last Action: Dec 11, 1979

H.Res. 788 (rule)

Introduced
Last Action: Sep 17, 1980

 
Status

This bill was introduced on October 17, 1979, in a previous session of Congress, but was not enacted.

Progress
Introduced Oct 17, 1979
Referred to Committee Oct 17, 1979
 
Full Title

A bill to amend the National Security Act of 1947 to prohibit the unauthorized disclosure of information identifying certain United States intelligence officers, agents, informants, and sources.

Summary

No summaries available.

 
Primary Source

THOMAS.gov (The Library of Congress)

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Notes

H.R. stands for House of Representatives bill.

A bill must be passed by both the House and Senate in identical form and then be signed by the president to become law.

The bill’s title was written by its sponsor.

GovTrack’s Bill Summary

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Library of Congress Summary

The summary below was written by the Congressional Research Service, which is a nonpartisan division of the Library of Congress.


8/1/1980--Reported to House amended, Part I.
(Reported to House from the Select Committee on Intelligence with amendment, H. Rept. 96-1219 (Part I)) Intelligence Identities Protection Act - Amends the National Security Act of 1947 by adding a new title V: Protection of Certain National Security Information. Establishes a maximum criminal penalty of ten years' imprisonment and/or a $50,000 fine for anyone who, having had authorized access to classified information, intentionally discloses to any individual not authorized to receive classified information any information that identifies a covert agent, knowing that the information so identifies such individual and that the United States is taking affirmative measures to conceal such individual's intelligence relationship to the United States. Establishes a maximum criminal penalty of five years' imprisonment and/or a $25,000 fine for anyone who, having had authorized access to classified information, learns the identity of a covert agent and intentionally discloses any information identifying such agent to any individual not authorized to receive classified information, knowing that the information so identifies such agent and that the United States is taking affirmative measures to conceal such agent's relationship to the United States. Establishes a maximum criminal penalty of three years' imprisonment and/or a $15,000 fine for anyone who with intent to impair or impede the foreign intelligence activities of the United States discloses such information with such knowledge.
Makes it a defense to such crimes that before the commission of the offense the United States had publicly acknowledged or revealed the intelligence relationship of the individual to the United States. Provides that no person other than the person committing such offense shall be subject to prosecution, except with respect to those acting in the course of an effort to identify and expose covert agents with intent to impair U.S. intelligence activities.
Stipulates that:
(1) proof of intentional disclosure shall not alone constitute proof of intent to impair U.S. intelligence activities; and
(2) it shall not be an offense to transmit such information directly to the congressional intelligence committees.
Directs the President to establish procedures to ensure that any employee of an intelligence agency or any member of the Armed Forces assigned to intelligence duties whose identity is classified information is afforded all appropriate assistance to conceal his identity.

House Republican Conference Summary

The summary below was written by the House Republican Conference, which is the caucus of Republicans in the House of Representatives.


No summary available.

House Democratic Caucus Summary

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