H.R. 5494 (97th): Ancient Indian Land Claims Settlement Act of 1982

Introduced:
Feb 09, 1982 (97th Congress, 1981–1982)
Status:
Died (Referred to Committee)
Sponsor
Gary Lee
Representative for New York's 33rd congressional district
Party
Republican
Related Bills
S. 2084 (identical)

Referred to Committee
Last Action: Feb 09, 1982

 
Status

This bill was introduced on February 9, 1982, in a previous session of Congress, but was not enacted.

Progress
Introduced Feb 09, 1982
Referred to Committee Feb 09, 1982
 
Full Title

A bill to establish a fair and consistent National Policy for the resolution of claims based on a purported lack of Congressional approval of ancient Indian land transfers and to clear the titles of lands subject to such claims.

Summary

No summaries available.

Cosponsors
9 cosponsors (8R, 1D) (show)
Committees

House Natural Resources

The committee chair determines whether a bill will move past the committee stage.

 
Primary Source

THOMAS.gov (The Library of Congress)

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Notes

H.R. stands for House of Representatives bill.

A bill must be passed by both the House and Senate in identical form and then be signed by the president to become law.

The bill’s title was written by its sponsor.

GovTrack’s Bill Summary

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Library of Congress Summary

The summary below was written by the Congressional Research Service, which is a nonpartisan division of the Library of Congress.


2/9/1982--Introduced.
Ancient Indian Land Claims Settlement Act of 1982 - Ratifies the transfers of land or natural resources within the States of New York or South Carolina, which were made on behalf of an Indian Tribe before January 1, 1912.
Extinguishes, by virtue of ratification, related claims against such transfers.
Exempts specified land in New York from ratification.
Directs the Secretary of the Interior to publish a notice in the Federal Register soliciting information from such Indian tribes about outstanding claims.
Directs the Secretary, within 180 days of such submission, to determine:
(1) the credibility of such claims; and
(2) the amount of fair compensation due credible claims.
Prohibits judicial review of such determination.
Requires such Indian tribes to accept or reject the Secretary's determination within 60 days.
States that such determination shall be binding if it is accepted.
Authorizes the Secretary to assist such Indian tribes receiving compensation to purchase other lands or natural resources.
Authorizes such Indian tribes to file a cause of action in the Court of Claims, against the United States, for compensation arising out of land transfer claims which have not been settled or determined by the Secretary. Gives the Court of Claims exclusive jurisdiction over such cases.
Sets out:
(1) criteria for determining entitlement to a recovery against the United States; and
(2) procedures for determining and paying the amount of such recovery.
Limits recovery due certain claims arising after July 22, 1790.
Assigns docket priority to claims brought under this Act before the Court of Claims. Authorizes appropriations.
Requires any contest of the constitutionality or validity of this Act to be brought in certain Federal district courts within a specified time.

House Republican Conference Summary

The summary below was written by the House Republican Conference, which is the caucus of Republicans in the House of Representatives.


No summary available.

House Democratic Caucus Summary

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