H.R. 6023 (98th): Generalized System of Preferences Renewal Act of 1984

Introduced:
Jul 25, 1984 (98th Congress, 1983–1984)
Status:
Died (Passed House)
Sponsor
William Frenzel
Representative for Minnesota's 3rd congressional district
Party
Republican
Related Bills
H.R. 3398 (Related)
Omnibus Tariff and Trade Act of 1984

Signed by the President
Oct 30, 1984

H.Res. 594 (rule)

Introduced
Last Action: Oct 01, 1984

 
Status

This bill was introduced in a previous session of Congress and was passed by the House on October 3, 1984 but was never passed by the Senate.

Progress
Introduced Jul 25, 1984
Referred to Committee Jul 25, 1984
Reported by Committee Sep 26, 1984
Passed House Oct 03, 1984
 
Full Title

A bill to amend the Trade Act of 1974 to renew the authority for the operation of the Generalized System of Preferences, and for other purposes.

Summary

No summaries available.

Cosponsors
none
Committees

House Ways and Means

Trade

Senate Finance

The committee chair determines whether a bill will move past the committee stage.

 
Primary Source

THOMAS.gov (The Library of Congress)

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Citation

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Notes

H.R. stands for House of Representatives bill.

A bill must be passed by both the House and Senate in identical form and then be signed by the president to become law.

The bill’s title was written by its sponsor.

GovTrack’s Bill Summary

We don’t have a summary available yet.

Library of Congress Summary

The summary below was written by the Congressional Research Service, which is a nonpartisan division of the Library of Congress.


10/3/1984--Passed House amended.
(Measure passed House, amended) Generalized System of Preferences Renewal Act of 1984 - Amends the Trade Act of 1974 to direct the President, in determining whether to provide duty-free treatment for an eligible article from a beneficiary developing country, to consider:
(1) the effect such action will have on furthering the economic development of such countries through the expansion of their exports; and
(2) the extent of the beneficiary developing country's competitiveness with respect to eligible articles.
Provides that Hungary may be designated as a beneficiary developing country.
Prohibits the President from designating as a beneficiary developing country any country that has not taken or is not taking steps to afford internationally recognized worker rights to workers in that country (including any designated zone in that country).
Defines "internationally recognized worker rights." Directs the President, in determining whether to designate a country a beneficiary developing country, to consider:
(1) the extent to which such country is providing the means for foreign nationals to exercise exclusive rights in intellectual property, including a patent, trademark, and copyright rights;
(2) the extent to which such country has taken action to reduce trade distorting investment practices and policies and to reduce or eliminate barriers to trade in services; and
(3) whether such country has taken or is taking steps to give to workers internationally recognized worker rights.
Prohibits the President from designating as articles eligible for duty-free treatment footwear, handbags, luggage, flat goods, work gloves, and leather wearing apparel which were not eligible articles on April 1, 1984.
Directs the Secretary of the Treasury, after consulting with the U.S. Trade Representative, to prescribe regulations governing rule of orgin requirements for the Generalized System of Preferences. Directs the President to report to Congress by January 4, 1987 on the application of the Generalized System of Preferences and on the actions taken by the President to withdraw, suspend, or limit the application of duty-free treatment to a country which has failed to take specified actions.
Prohibits treating a country as a beneficiary developing country with respect to any article if the amount of exports of such article by such country to the United States exceeds a certain quantity or value.
Declares that such prohibition shall not apply if a like or competitive article is not produced in the United States on January 3, 1985.
Authorizes the President to disregard such prohibition if the appraised value of the total U.S. imports of such article does not exceed a specified amount.
Directs the President to conduct a general review of eligible articles in the Generalized System of Preferences by January 4, 1986.
Provides for changing the tariff treatment of a beneficiary developing country if the President determines:
(1) that it has demonstrated a sufficient degree of competitiveness;
(2) that it has a per capita gross national product of $5,000 or more or has increased its exports to the United States by a specified percentage; or
(3) that it has a per capita gross national product of $9,000 or more.
Authorizes the President, after January 4, 1986, to waive changing the tariff treatment of a beneficiary developing country if the President:
(1) receives the advice of the International Trade Commission on whether a U.S. industry is likely to be adversely affected by such waiver;
(2) determines that such waiver is in the U.S. interest; and
(3) publishes such determination and the reasons for it in the Federal Register. Limits such waiver authority.
Lists factors to be considered in deciding whether to grant such a waiver.
Permits redesignating a country as a beneficiary developing country if imports of eligible articles from such country do not exceed specified limits for two years.
Extends the Generalized System of Preferences until January 3, 1990.
Requires the President to report on the operation of the Generalized System of Preferences to Congress by January 4, 1990.
Directs the President to report annually to Congress on the status of internationally recognized worker rights within each beneficiary developing country.
Requires the appropriate U.S. agencies to assist beneficiary developing countries to develop and implement measures designed to assure that the agricultural sectors of their economies are not directed to export markets to the detriment of the production of food stuffs for their citizenry.

House Republican Conference Summary

The summary below was written by the House Republican Conference, which is the caucus of Republicans in the House of Representatives.


No summary available.

House Democratic Caucus Summary

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