< Back to S. 1917 (99th Congress, 1985–1986)

Text of the Special Foreign Assistance Act of 1986

This bill was enacted after being signed by the President on October 24, 1986. The text of the bill below is as of Oct 24, 1986 (Passed Congress/Enrolled Bill).

100 STAT. 3010                      PUBLIC LAW 99-529—OCT. 24, 1986

                    Public Law 99-529
                    99th Congress
                                                          An Act
  Oct. 24, 1986     To promote immunization and oral rehydration in developing countries, to promote
   [S. 1917]          democracy in Haiti, to protect tropical forests and biological diversity in developing
                      countries, to «iuthorize increased funding for the Child Survival Fund and for
                      international narcotics control assistance, and for other purposes.
Special Foreign      Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the
Assistance Act of   United States of America in Congress assembled,
1986.
22 u s e 2151       SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.                                                                     ^
note.
                      This Act may be cited as the "Special Foreign Assistance Act of
                    1986".
                           TITLE I—PROMOTING IMMUNIZATION AND ORAL
                             REHYDRATION IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES
                    SEC. 101. FINDINGS.                                                                     '
                        The Congress finds that—
                             (1) the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) reports
                          that 3.5 million children die annually because they have not
                          been immunized against the six major childhood diseases: polio,
                    .j_ , measles, whooping cough, diphtheria, tetanus, and tuberculosis;
                     "       (2) at present less than 20 percent of children in the develop-
                          ing world are fully immunized against these diseases;
                             (3) each year more than five million additional children are
                          permanently disabled and suffer diminished capacities to
                          contribute to the economic, social, and political development of
                          their countries because they have not been immunized;
                             (4) ten million additional childhood deaths from immunizable
                          and potentially immunizable diseases could be averted annually
                          by the development of techniques in biotechnology for new and
                          cost-effective vaccines;
                             (5) the World Health Assembly, the Executive Board of the
                          United Nations Children's Fund, and the United Nations (Gen-
                          eral Assembly are calling upon the nations of the world to
                          commit the resources necessary to meet the challenge of univer-
                          sal access to childhood immunization by 1990;
                             (6) at the 1984 "Bellagio Conference' it w£is determined that
                          the goal of universal childhood immunization by 1990 is indeed
                          achievable; and
                             (7) the Congress has expressed its expectation that the Agency
                          for International Development will set as a goal the immuniza-
                          tion by 1990 of at least 80 percent of all the children in those
                          countries in which the Agency has a program.
                    SEC. 102. UNITED STATES PARTICIPATION IN GLOBAL EFFORT.
President of U.S.     (a) UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT SUPPORT.—The Congress calls
                    upon the President to direct the Agency for International Develop-
                    ment, working through the Centers for Disease Control and other
                    appropriate Federal agencies, to work in a global effort to provide
                    enhanced support toward achieving the goal of universal access to
                    childhood immunization by 1990 by—

                                                                                              ;.-;'"/ •>'

PUBLIC LAW 99-529—OCT. 24, 1986 100 STAT. 3011 (1) assisting in the delivery, distribution, and use of vaccines, including— (A) the building of locally sustainable systems and tech- nical capacities in developing countries to reach, by the alii • appropriate age, not less than 80 percent of their annually '" projected target population with the full schedule of re- '^ quired immunizations; and c (B) the development of a sufficient network of indigenous '* professionals and institutions with responsibility for devel- *'•' oping, monitoring, and assessing immunization programs and continually adapting strategies to reach the goal of ' preventing immunizable diseases; and f (2) performing, supporting, and encouraging research and - development activities, both in the public and private sector, that will be targeted at developing new vaccines and at modify- ing and improving existing vaccines to make them more appro- priate for use in developing countries, (b) PRIVATE SECTOR SUPPORT.—In support of this global effort, the President of U.S. President should appeal to the people of the United States and the United States private sector to support public and private efforts to provide the resources necessary to achieve universal access to child- hood immunization by 1990. SEC. 103. FUNDING LEVELS. 22 u s e 2151b. (a) EARMARKING.—Section 104(c)(3) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 is amended by adding at the end thereof the following: "Of the aggregate amounts made available for fiscal year 1987 to carry out paragraph (2) of this subsection (relating to the Child Survival Fund) and to carry out subsection (c) (relating to development assistance for health), $50,000,000 shall be used to carry out this paragraph.". (b) AUTHORIZATION LEVEL FOR CHILD SURVIVAL FUND.—Section 104(c)(2)(B) of that Act is amended by striking out "$25,000,000 for fiscal year 1987" and inserting in lieu thereof "$75,000,000 for fiscal year 1987". . :. TITLE II—PROMOTING DEMOCRACY IN HAITI » SEC. 201. FINDINGS CONCERNING HAITI. The Congress finds that— (1) the establishment of an interim government in Haiti committed to a restoration of democracy provides Haiti with an opportunity to build the political, social, and economic institu- tions necessary to promote Haiti's development, to provide a i better future for the people of Haiti, and to provide the frame- work for more effective mutual cooperation with the United i States, Haiti's neighbor in the Caribbean, and the other nations .a*tSi,Ti tiL,l-.-~.:>i K of the Hemisphere; (2) the magnitude of the political, economic, and social tasks facing the people of Haiti will make the achievement of a better :• future a difficult task which will require a determined and sustained effort by the Haitian people over a long period of time t and will require significant external assistance from the United States and other donors; and 'i (3) it is in the interest of the United States to provide appro- .WHil.liSXj priate support for the development of Haiti, a close neighbor
100 STAT. 3012 PUBLIC LAW 99-529—OCT. 24, 1986 ,6f- which is one of the world's poorest nations and which is commit- ted to the establishment of a democratic government. SEC. 202. ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE FOR HAITI. (a) EARMARKING OF FUNDS.—Not less than $108,000,000 of the aggregate amounts available for fiscal year 1987 to carry out sec- 22 u s e 2151a, tions 103 through 106 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (relating 2151d. to development assistance), chapter 4 of part II of that Act (relating 22 u s e 2346. to the Economic Support Fund), and titles I and II of the Agricul- 7 u s e 1701, tural Trade Development and Assistance Act of 1954 (relating to the 1721. Food for Peace Program) shall be available only for Haiti. (b) USE OF DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE.—Assistance under sections 22 use 103 through 106 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 which is 2151a-2151d. provided for Haiti pursuant to subsection (a) shall be used to support a transition to democracy in Haiti, emphasizing foreign investment, job creation (especially in the private sector), rural development, health care and sanitation, small-scale irrigation, reforestation and land conservation, and literacy education. Such assistance should reflect the need to distribute development assistance resources more equitably among the various regions in Haiti in order to support sustainable development in all of Haiti. (c) REQUIREMENT FOR SEGREGATED ACCOUNT FOR ECONOMIC SUP- PORT ASSISTANCE FUNDS PAID TO GOVERNMENT OF HAITI.—Funds itiii'D^jm under chapter 4 of part II of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 which are made available for Haiti pursuant to subsection (a) may be paid to the Government of Haiti only if the Government of Haiti will maintain those funds in a separate account and not commingle them with other funds. (d) CONDITIONS ON ECONOMIC SUPPORT AND DEVELOPMENT ASSIST- ANCE.—Funds may be obligated for assistance for Haiti under sec- tions 103 through 106 of chapter 4 of part II of the Foreign Assist- ance Act of 1961 pursuant to subsection (a) only if the President determines that the interim Government of Haiti— 1^..,- (1) is improving the human rights situation in Haiti; (2) is implementing its timetable for completion of a new constitution that promotes genuine democratic reforms and guarantees the fundamental principles of democracy; (3) is establishing a framework for free and open elections leading to a democratically-elected civilian government, which would include free and functioning political parties and associa- tions, free labor unions, and freedom of the press; (4) is cooperating fully in implementing United States devel- opment, food, and other economic sissistance programs in Haiti (including programs for prior fiscal years); (5) is maintaining a system of fiscal accountability to ensure that all resources allocated to the development of Haiti are used in the most effective and efficient manner; Human rights. (6) is continuing its investigation of alleged human rights abuses and corruption by the Duvalier government and is prosecuting, in accordance with due process, those responsible for human rights abuses and corruption; (7) is maintaining a free and independent judiciary system; (8) is continuing to cooperate with the United States in halt- ing illegal emigration to the United States from Haiti; and (9) is encouraging private sector development. 22 u s e 290f. (e) INTER-AMERICAN FOUNDATION.—Section 401(sX2) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1969 is amended by striking out "$11,969,000 for
PUBLIC LAW 99-529—OCT. 24, 1986 100 STAT. 3013 fiscal year 1987" and inserting in lieu thereof "$12,969,000 for fiscal year 1987 (not less than $1,000,000 of which shall be for Haiti)", (f) ADDITIONAL ASSISTANCE FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN HAITI.—In order to assist economic development in Haiti, a Foreign Commercial Service officer should be assigned to the United States Embassy in Haiti. SEC. 203. MILITARY TRAINING AND OTHER NONLETHAL ASSISTANCE FOR HAITI. (a) AUTHORIZATION OF ASSISTANCE.—Up to $4,000,000 of the aggre- gate amounts available for fisceil year 1987 to carry out chapter 2 of part II of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (relating to grant 22 use 2347. military gissistance), chapter 5 of part II of that Act (relating to international military education and training), and the Arms Export Control Act (relating to FMS assistance) may be made 22 use 2751. available for Haiti for education, training, and other nonlethal assistance (such £is transportation equipment, communications equipment, and uniforms). (b) CONDITIONS ON MIUTARY ASSISTANCE.—Funds made available Human rights. pursuant to subsection (a) may be obligated only if the President certifies to the Congress the following: (1) The Government of Haiti has submitted a formgd request to the United States specifjdng a comprehensive plan for the reform and reorganization of the mission, command, and con- trol structures of the Haitian armed forces consistent with a transition to democracy, the rule of law, constitutional govern- ment, and an elected civilian government. Such a plan should include a publicly announced commitment by the armed forces of Haiti to abide by international human rights standards and adoption of a code of conduct to eissure adherence to these standards. (2) The Government of Haiti is making substantial efforts— (A) to prevent the involvement of the Haitian armed forces in human rights abuses and corruption by removing from those forces and prosecuting, in accordance with due process, those military personnel responsible for the human " • rights abuses and corruption; (B) to ensure that freedom of speech and assembly are respected; (C) to conduct investigations into the killings of unarmed civilians in Gonaives, Martissant, and Fort Dimanche, to Stts"! ':c J Oc, prosecute, in accordance with due process, those responsible for those killings, and to prevent any similar occurrences in the future; ti«w (D) to provide education and training to the Haitian Education. armed forces with respect to internationally recognized human rights and the civil and political rights essential to democracy, in order to enable those forces to function consistent with those rights; and (E) to take steps to implement the policy of the Govern- ment of Haiti requiring former members of the Volunteers for National Security (VSN) to turn in their weapons and to take the necessary actions to enforce this requirement. (c) REPORTS.—Not later than three months after the President President of U.S. submits his certification under subsection (b) and every three months thereafter, the President shall report to the Congress on the extent to which the actions of the Government of Haiti are consist-
100 STAT. 3014 PUBLIC LAW 99-529—OCT. 24, 1986 ent with each of the objectives specified in subsection (b). Half of the assistance provided pursuant to subsection (a) shall be withheld from delivery until the President submits the first such report. (d) NOTIFICATION TO CONGRESS.—Funds made available pursuant to subsection (a) may be obligated only if the Committee on Appro- priations and the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Appropriations and the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate are notified fifteen days in advance. (e) RELATION TO EXISTING PROVISION.—Assistance under subsec- tion (a) may be provided notwithstanding the limitations contained :tiv in section 705(e) of the International Security and Development 99 Stat. 241. Cooperation Act of 1985 and is in addition to the assistance allowed under that section. SEC. 204. RECOVERY BY HAITI OF ASSETS STOLEN BY DUVALIER REGIME. (a) FINDINGS.—The Congress finds that— (1) the Grovemment of Haiti believes that former president- j? a;;iifiBy.aH for-life Jean Claude Duvalier and other individuals associated with the Duvalier regime illegally diverted to their own use substantial amounts of the assets of the Grovernment of Haiti; (2) the Grovemment of Haiti is attempting to locate and recover those assets through legal means; (3) virtually every relevant jurisdiction, both in the United States and abroad, requires the posting of some form of security to secure the issuance of orders of attachment or other judicial seizures of property; (4) the Government of Haiti is unable, without outside assist- ance, to post the necessary security because of its lack of assets; (5) Haiti's economic situation could be significantly improved, and the need for external resources reduced, if the Government of Haiti is able to pursue its legal remedies against those who are in large part responsible for the economic crisis in Haiti; and (6) the United States has a substantial foreign policy interest in helping the Grovernment of Haiti recover any assets which were illegally diverted by those associated with the Duvalier r^ime. (b) ACTIONS TO ASSIST HAITI.—The President shall exercise the authorities granted by section 203 of the International Emergency 50 use 1702. Economic Powers Act (50 U.S.C. App. 1702) to assist the Government of Haiti in its efforts to recover, through legal proceedings, assets which the Government of Haiti alleges were stolen by former presi- dent-for-life Jean Claude Duvalier and other individuals associated with the Duvalier regime. This subsection shall be deemed to satisfy 50 use 1701. the requirements of section 202 of that Act. TITLE ni—PROTECTING TROPICAL FORESTS AND BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES SEC. 301. PROTECTING TROPICAL FORESTS. Clhapter 1 of part I of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 is amended— 22 use 2i5ip. (1) by redesignating section 118 as section 117; ira (2) by striking out subsection (d) of that section; and (3) by inserting after that section the following new section 118: -, ,. ,.,.... , . . _ .„ :„ ....,_,..:,. ....,„ _ . . . „ . . ...__
PUBLIC LAW 99-529—OCT. 24, 1986 100 STAT. 3015 "SEC. 118. TROPICAL FORESTS. 22 USC 2151p-l. "(a) IMPORTANCE OF FORESTS AND TREE COVER.—In enacting sec- tion 103(bX3) of this Act the Congress recognized the importance of forests and tree cover to the developing countries. The Congress is particularly concerned about the continuing and accelerating alteration, destruction, and loss of tropical forests in developing countries, which pose a serious threat to development and the environment. Tropical forest destruction and loss— "(1) result in shortages of wood, especially wood for fuel; loss of biologically productive wetlands; siltation of lakes, reservoirs, and irrigation systems; floods; destruction of indigenous peoples; extinction of plant and animal species; reduced capacity for food production; and loss of genetic resources; and "(2) can result in desertification and destabilization of the earth's climate. Properly managed tropical forests provide a sustained flow of resources essential to the economic growth of developing countries, as well as genetic resources of value to developed and developing countries alike. "(b) PRIORITIES.—The concerns expressed in subsection (a) gmd the recommendations of the United States Intergigency Task Force on Tropical Forests shall be given high priority by the President— ,^, "(1) in formulating and carrying out programs and policies .^ with respect to developing countries, including those relating to bilateral and multilateral assistance and those relating to pri- vate sector activities; and "(2) in seeking opportunities to coordinate public and private development and investment activities which affect forests in developing countries. "(c) ASSISTANCE TO DEVELOPING COUNTRIES.—In providing assist- President of U.S. ance to developing countries, the President shall do the following: "(1) Place a high priority on conservation eind sustainable management of tropical forests. "(2) To the fullest extent feasible, engage in dialogues and exchanges of information with recipient countries— "(A) which stress the importance of conserving and sustainably managing forest resources for the long-term / . economic benefit of those countries, as well as the irrevers- ible losses associated with forest destruction, and "(B) which identify and focus on policies of those coun- tries which directly or indirectly contribute to deforest- ation. "(3) To the fullest extent feasible, support projects and activities— "(A) which offer emplojnnent and income alternatives to those who otherwise would cause destruction and loss of forests, and "(B) which help developing countries identify and imple- ment alternatives to colonizing forested areas. "(4) To the fullest extent feasible, support training programs, educational efforts, and the establishment or strengthening of institutions which increase the capacity of developing countries to formulate forest policies, engage in relevant land-use plan- ning, and otherwise improve the management of their forests. "(5) To the fullest extent feasible, help end destructive slash- and-burn agriculture by supporting stable and productive farm-
100 STAT. 3016 PUBLIC LAW 99-529—OCT. 24, 1986 ing practices in areas already cleared or degraded and on lands which inevitably will be settled, with special emphasis on dem- onstrating the feasibility of agroforestry and other techniques which use technologies and methods suited to the local environ- ment and traditional agricultural techniques and feature close consultation with and involvement of local people. "(6) To the fullest extent feasible, help conserve forests which have not yet been degraded, by helping to increase production on lands already cleared or degraded through support of re- forestation, fuelwood, and other sustainable forestry projects and practices, making sure that local people are involved at all stages of project design and implementation. "(7) To the fullest extent feasible, support projects and other activities to conserve forested watersheds and rehabilitate those which have been deforested, making sure that local people are involved at all stages of project design and implementation. "(8) To the fullest extent feasible, support training, research, and other actions which lead to sustainable and more environ- mentally sound practices for timber harvesting, removal, and processing, including reforestation, soil conservation, and other activities to rehabilitate degraded forest lands. Research "(9) To the fullest extent feasible, support research to expand and knowledge of tropical forests and identify alternatives which development. will prevent forest destruction, loss, or degradation, including research in agroforestry, sustainable management of natural forests, small-scale farms and gardens, small-scale animal hus- bandry, wider application of adopted traditional practices, and suitable crops and crop combinations. "(10) To the fullest extent feasible, conserve biological diver- sity in forest areas by— "(A) supporting and cooperating with United States Government agencies, other donors (both bilateral and multilateral), and other appropriate governmental, inter- governmental, and nongovernmental organizations in ef- •ha forts to identify, establish, and maintain a representative network of protected tropical forest ecosystems on a world- wide basis; "(B) whenever appropriate, making the establishment of protected areas a condition of support for activities involv- ing forest clearance or degradation; and -l»-? (C) helping developing countries identify tropical forest ecosystems and species in need of protection and establish and maintain appropriate protected areas. isfii "(11) To the fullest extent feasible, engage in efforts to in- crease the awareness of United States Government agencies and other donors, both bilateral and multilateral, of the imme- diate and long-term value of tropical forests. "(12) To the fullest extent feasible, utilize the resources and abilities of all relevant United States Government agencies. "(13) Require that any program or project under this chapter significantly affecting tropical forests (including projects involv- ing the planting of exotic plant species)— "(A) be based upon careful analysis of the alternatives available to achieve the best sustainable use of the land, and "(B) take full account of the environmental impacts of the proposed activities on biological diversity, « >, M« /»y,
PUBLIC LAW 99-529—OCT. 24, 1986 100 STAT. 3017 as provided for in the environmental procedures of the Agency for International Development. "(14) Deny assistance under this chapter for— "(A) the procurement or use of logging equipment, unless an environmental assessment indicates that all timber harvesting operations involved will be conducted in an , , environmentally sound msuiner which minimizes forest ' destruction and that the proposed activity will produce positive economic benefits and sustainable forest manage- ment systems; and !^ "(B) actions which significantly degrade national parks or " similar protected areas which contain tropical forests or introduce exotic plants or animals into such areas. "(15) Deny assistance under this chapter for the following activities unless an environmental assessment indicates that the proposed activity will contribute significantly and directly to improving the livelihood of the rural poor and will be con- ducted in an environmentally sound manner which supports sustainable development: "(A) Activities which would result in the conversion of forest lands to the rearing of livestock. "(B) The construction, upgrading, or maintenance of .. J, roads (including temporary haul roads for logging or other extractive industries) which pass through relatively ,>.: -^ undegraded forest lands. "(C) The colonization of forest lands. "(D) The construction of dams or other water control structures which flood relatively undegraded forest lands. "(d) PVOs AND OTHER NONGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS.— Whenever feasible, the President shall accomplish the objectives of this section through projects managed by private and voluntary organizations or international, regional, or national nongovern- mental organizations which are active in the region or country where the project is located. "(e) COUNTRY ANALYSIS REQUIREMENTS.—Each country develop- ment strategy statement or other country plan prepared by the Agency for International Development shall include an analysis of— "(1) the actions necessary in that country to achieve conserva- tion and sustainable management of tropical forests, and "(2) the extent to which the actions proposed for support by the Agency meet the needs thus identified. "(f) ANNUAL REPORT.—Each annual report required by section 634(a) of this Act shall include a report on the implementation of 22 USC 2394. this section.". SEC. 302. PROTECTING BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY. 22 USC 2151q. Section 119 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 is amended by striking out subsections (c) and (d) and inserting in lieu thereof the following: "(c) FUNDING LEVEL.—For fiscal year 1987, not less than $2,500,000 of the funds available to carry out this part (excluding funds made available to carry out section 104(cX2), relating to the 22 USC 2l5lb. Child Survival Fund) shall be allocated for assistance pursuant to subsection (b) for activities which were not funded prior to fiscal year 1987. In addition, the Agency for International Development shall, to the fullest extent possible, continue and increase assistance
100 STAT. 3018 PUBLIC LAW 99-529—OCT. 24, 1986 pursuant to subsection (b) for activities for which assistance was provided in fiscal years prior to fiscal year 1987. "(d) COUNTRY ANALYSIS REQUIREMENTS.—Each country develop- ment strategy statement or other country plan prepared by the Agency for International Development shall include an analysis of^ "(1) the actions necessary in that country to conserve bio- logical diversity, and "(2) the extent to which the actions proposed for support by the Agency meet the needs thus identified. "(e) LOCAL INVOLVEMENT.—To the fullest extent possible, projects supported under this section shall include close consultation with and involvement of local people at all stages of design and implementation. (f) PVOs AND OTHER NONGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS.— Whenever feasible, the objectives of this section shall be accom- plished through projects managed by appropriate private and voluntary organizations, or international, regional, or national non- governmental organizations, which are active in the region or coun- try where the project is located. "(g) ACTIONS BY AID.—The Administrator of the Agency for Inter- national Development shall— "(1) cooperate with appropriate international organizations, both governmental and nongovernmental; .*^V, "(2) look to the World Conservation Strategy as an overall * guide for actions to conserve biological diversity; "(3) engage in dialogues and exchanges of information with recipient countries which stress the importance of conserving biological diversity for the long-term economic benefit of those countries and which identify and focus on policies of those countries which directly or indirectly contribute to loss of bio- logical diversity; "(4) support training and education efforts which improve the capacity of recipient countries to prevent loss of biological - > diversity; "(5) whenever possible, enter into long-term Eigreements in which the recipient country agrees to protect ecosystems or other wildlife habitats recommended for protection by relevant ' governmental or nongovernmental organizations or as a result -ev of activities undertaken pursuant to paragraph (6), and the United States agrees to provide, subject to obtaining the nep- V • essary appropriations, additional assistance necessary for the establishment and maintenance of such protected areas; .si "(6) support, as necessary and in cooperation with the appro- ;£?:?>•? 14. i priate governmental and nongovernmental organizations, ef- forts to identify and survey ecosystems in recipient countries worthy of protection; .^K^ "(7) cooperate with and support the relevant efforts of other ¥»:! agencies of the United States Government, including the United "I* States Fish and Wildlife Service, the National Park Service, the Forest Service, and the Peace Corps; "(8) review the Agency's environmental regulations and revise them as necessary to ensure that ongoing and proposed i actions by the Agency do not inadvertently endanger wildlife species or their critical habitats, harm protected areas, or have other adverse impacts on biological diversity (and shall report to the Congress within a year after the date of enactment of this 5 Ml paragraph on the actions taken pursuant to this paragraph);
PUBLIC LAW 99-529—OCT. 24, 1986 100 STAT. 3019 "(9) ensure that environmental profiles sponsored by the Agency include information needed for conservation of bio- logical diversity; and "(10) deny any direct or indirect assistance under this chapter for actions which significantly degrade national parks or simi- lar protected areas or introduce exotic plants or animals into such areas. "(h) ANNUAL REPORTS.—Each annual report required by section 634(a) of this Act shall include, in a separate volume, a report on the implementation of this section.". TITLE IV—MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS RELATING TO CERTAIN FOREIGN ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SEC. 401. INCREASE AUTHORIZATION FOR INTERNATIONAL NARCOTICS 22 USC 2291a. CONTROL PROGRAMS. Section 482(a)(1) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 is amended by striking out "$57,529,000 for the fiscal year 1987" and inserting in lieu thereof "$65,445,000 for the fiscal year 1987". SEC. 402. AUTHORIZING A SEPARATE LINE ITEM APPROPRIATION FOR 22 USC 2427. THE INSPECTOR GENERAL OF THE AGENCY FOR INTER- NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT. Section 667(a)(1) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 is amended by inserting after "Act" the following: ", of which $21,750,000 for the fiscal year 1987 is authorized for the necessary operating expenses of the Office of the Inspector General of the Agency for International Development and the remaining amount for the fiscal year is au- thorized for other necessary operating expenses of that agency". SEC. 403. ADDITIONAL PROVISIONS. (a) BOARD OF THE INTER-AMERICAN FOUNDATION.—Section 401(g) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1969 (22 U.S.C. 290f.(g)) is amended by striking out "seven" in the first sentence and "Four" in the second sentence and inserting in lieu thereof "nine" and "Six", respec- tively. (b) EFFECTIVE DATE.—The amendments made by subsection (a) 22 u s e 290f shall take effect 120 days after the date of enactment of this Act. note. SEC. 404. OFFSETTING REDUCTIONS IN CERTAIN FOREIGN ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS. In order to provide the increased authorizations of appropriations contained in section 103(b), section 202(e), and section 401 without increasing the overall amount authorized to be appropriated for foreign assistance programs for fiscal year 1987— (1) section 104(g)(1)(B) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 22 use 2i5ib. (relating to development assistance for health programs) is amended by striking out "$205,000,000 for fiscal year 1987" and inserting in lieu thereof "$180,000,000 for fiscal year 1987"; and (2) section 302(aXl) of that Act (relating to international 22 use 2222. organizations and programs) is amended by striking out "$270,000,000 for fiscal year 1987" and insert in lieu thereof "$236,084,000 for fiscal year 1987".
100 STAT. 3020 PUBLIC LAW 99-529—OCT. 24, 1986 22 u s e 3929. SEC. 405. CONFORMING AMENDMENT. Paragraph (6) of section 413(a) of the Omnibus Diplomatic Secu- Ante, p. 867. rity and Antiterrorism Act of 1986 (PubHc Law 99-399) is repealed; and the sentence of section 209(a)(1) of the Foreign Service Act of 22 use 3929. 1980 which was repealed by that paragraph is hereby re-enacted. Approved October 24, 1986. v^'i f. rfi'"; ..• O^. •' •}'..' LEGISLATIVE HISTORY—S. 1917: SENATE REPORTS: No. 99-385 (eomm. on Foreign Relations). CONGRESSIONAL RECORD, Vol. 132 (1986): Aug. 15, considered and passed Senate. Sept. 25, considered and passed House, amended. Oct. 3, Senate concurred in House amendments with an amendment. Oct. 6, House concurred in Senate amendment. WEEKLY COMPILATION OF PRESIDENTIAL DOCUMENTS, Vol. 22 (1986): Oct. 24, Presidential statement.