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Rep. Emanuel Cleaver II’s 2020 Report Card

Representative from Missouri's 5th District
Democrat
Serving Jan 4, 2005 – Jan 3, 2023


These statistics cover Cleaver’s record during the 116th Congress (Jan 3, 2019-Jan 3, 2021) and compare him to other representatives also serving at the end of the session. Last updated on Jan 30, 2021.

A higher or lower number below doesn’t necessarily make this legislator any better or worse, or more or less effective, than other Members of Congress. We present these statistics for you to understand the quantitative aspects of Cleaver’s legislative career and make your own judgements based on what activities you think are important.

Keep in mind that there are many important aspects of being a legislator besides what can be measured, such as constituent services and performing oversight of the executive branch, which aren’t reflected here.

 

Got influential cosponsors the most often compared to Missouri Delegation

6 of Cleaver’s bills and resolutions in the 116th Congress had a cosponsor who was a chair or ranking member of a committee that the bill was referred to. Getting support from committee leaders on relevant committees is a crucial step in moving legislation forward.

Those bills were: H.R. 1953: Hello Girls Congressional Gold Medal …; H.R. 2583: To designate Union Station in …; H.R. 3778: Cady Housh and Gemesha Thomas …; H.R. 6326: COVID-19 Emergency Housing Relief Act …; H.R. 6327: To authorize United States participation …; H.R. 6806: COVID-19 Emergency Housing Relief Act …

Compare to all Missouri Delegation (88th percentile); Serving 10+ Years (64th percentile); House Democrats (53rd percentile); All Representatives (71st percentile).


 

Got bipartisan cosponsors on the most bills compared to Missouri Delegation

In this era of partisanship, it is important to see Members of Congress working across the aisle. 16 of Cleaver’s 24 bills and resolutions had a cosponsor from a different political party than the party Cleaver caucused with in the 116th Congress.

Compare to all Missouri Delegation (88th percentile); Serving 10+ Years (74th percentile); House Democrats (65th percentile); All Representatives (76th percentile).

Cosponsors who caucused with neither the Democratic nor Republican party do not count toward this statistic.


 

Cosponsored the most bills compared to Missouri Delegation

Cleaver cosponsored 481 bills and resolutions introduced by other Members of Congress. Cosponsorship shows a willingness to work with others to advance policy goals. View Cosponsored Bills »

Compare to all Missouri Delegation (88th percentile); Serving 10+ Years (69th percentile); House Democrats (45th percentile); All Representatives (69th percentile).


 

Joined bipartisan bills the least often compared to Missouri Delegation

Of the 481 bills that Cleaver cosponsored, 7% were introduced by a legislator who was not a Democrat. View Cosponsored Bills »

Compare to all Missouri Delegation (0th percentile); Serving 10+ Years (26th percentile); House Democrats (36th percentile); All Representatives (20th percentile).

Only Democratic and Republican Members of Congress who cosponsored more than 10 bills and resolutions are included in this statistic.


 

Ranked most politically left compared to Missouri Delegation

Our unique ideology analysis assigns a score to Members of Congress according to their legislative behavior by how similar the pattern of bills and resolutions they cosponsor are to other Members of Congress.

For more, see our methodology. Note that because on this page only legislative activity in the 116th Congress is considered, the ideology score here may differ from Cleaver’s score elsewhere on GovTrack.

Compare to all Missouri Delegation (0th percentile); Serving 10+ Years (25th percentile); House Democrats (37th percentile); All Representatives (20th percentile).


 

Ranked the top leader compared to Missouri Delegation

Our unique leadership analysis looks at who is cosponsoring whose bills. A higher score shows a greater ability to get cosponsors on bills.

For more, see our methodology. Note that because on this page only legislative activity in the 116th Congress is considered, the leadership score here may differ from Cleaver’s score elsewhere on GovTrack.

Compare to all Missouri Delegation (88th percentile); Serving 10+ Years (68th percentile); House Democrats (62nd percentile); All Representatives (78th percentile).


 

Introduced the most bills compared to Missouri Delegation (tied with 1 other)

Cleaver introduced 24 bills and resolutions in the 116th Congress. View Bills »

Compare to all Missouri Delegation (75th percentile); Serving 10+ Years (57th percentile); House Democrats (37th percentile); All Representatives (57th percentile).


 

Got bicameral support on the most bills compared to Missouri Delegation (tied with 1 other)

The House and Senate often work on the same issue simultaneously by introducing companion bills in each chamber. 5 of Cleaver’s bills and resolutions had a companion bill in the Senate. Working with a sponsor in the other chamber makes a bill more likely to be passed by both the House and Senate.

Those bills were: H.R. 1161: Student Loan Disclosure Modernization Act; H.R. 2583: To designate Union Station in …; H.R. 6457: Disaster and Emergency Pricing Abuse …; H.R. 6964: To establish a lower Missouri …; H.R. 8291: TREE Act of 2020

Compare to all Missouri Delegation (75th percentile); Serving 10+ Years (62nd percentile); House Democrats (48th percentile); All Representatives (64th percentile).

Companion bills are those that are identified as “identical” by Congress’s Congressional Research Service.


 

Got their bills out of committee the 2nd most often compared to Missouri Delegation

Most bills and resolutions languish in committee without any action. Cleaver introduced 5 bills in the 116th Congress that got past committee and to the floor for consideration.

Those bills were: H.R. 1122: Housing Choice Voucher Mobility Demonstration …; H.R. 2514: COUNTER Act of 2019; H.R. 3699: Pipeline Security Act; H.R. 4104: Negro Leagues Baseball Centennial Commemorative …; H.R. 4403: Stop Debt Collection Abuse Act …

Compare to all Missouri Delegation (75th percentile); Serving 10+ Years (66th percentile); House Democrats (53rd percentile); All Representatives (71st percentile).


 

Got the 2nd most cosponsors on their bills compared to Missouri Delegation

Cleaver’s bills and resolutions had 470 cosponsors in the 116th Congress. Securing cosponsors is an important part of getting support for a bill, although having more cosponsors does not always mean a bill will get a vote. View Bills »

Compare to all Missouri Delegation (75th percentile); Serving 10+ Years (61st percentile); House Democrats (51st percentile); All Representatives (70th percentile).


 

Was 92nd most absent in votes compared to All Representatives (tied with 3 others)

Cleaver missed 4.6% of votes (44 of 954 votes) in the 116th Congress. View Cleaver’s Profile »

Compare to all Missouri Delegation (75th percentile); Serving 10+ Years (76th percentile); All Representatives (78th percentile).

The Speaker of the House, per current House rules, is not required to vote in “ordinary legislative proceedings” and is never recorded as missing a vote, and may not be included in the comparison with other representatives if not voting. The delegates from the five island territories and the District of Columbia are not eligible to vote in most roll call votes and so may not appear here if not elligible for any vote during the time period of these statistics.


 

Laws Enacted

Cleaver introduced 1 bill that became law, including via incorporation into other measures, in the 116th Congress. Keep in mind that it takes a law to repeal a law. Very few bills ever become law. View Enacted Bills »

Those bills were: H.R. 4104: Negro Leagues Baseball Centennial Commemorative …

Compare to all Missouri Delegation (62nd percentile); Serving 10+ Years (38th percentile); House Democrats (25th percentile); All Representatives (37th percentile).

The legislator must be the primary sponsor of the bill or joint resolution that was enacted or the primary sponsor of a bill or joint resolution for which at least about one third of its text was incorporated into another bill or joint resolution that was enacted as law, as determined by an automated analysis. While a legislator may lay claim to authoring other bills that became law, these cases are difficult for us to track quantitatively. We also exclude bills where the sponsor’s original intent is not in the final bill.


 

Committee Positions

Cleaver held a leadership position on 0 committees and 1 subcommittee, as either a chair (majority party) or ranking member (minority party), at the end of the session. View Cleaver’s Profile »

Compare to all Missouri Delegation (25th percentile); Serving 10+ Years (19th percentile); House Democrats (40th percentile); All Representatives (42nd percentile).


Additional Notes

Leadership/Ideology: The leadership and ideology scores are not displayed for Members of Congress who introduced fewer than 10 bills, or, for ideology, for Members of Congress that have a low leadership score, as there is usually not enough data in these cases to compute reliable leadership and ideology statistics.

Missing Bills: We exclude bills from some statistics where the sponsor’s original intent is not in the final bill because the bill’s text was replaced in whole with unrelated provisions (i.e. it became a vehicle for passage of unrelated provisions).

Ranking Members (RkMembs): The chair of a committee is always selected from the political party that holds the most seats in the chamber, called the “majority party”. The “ranking member” (sometimes “RkMembs”) is the title given to the senior-most member of the committee not in the majority party.

Freshmen/Sophomores: Freshmen and sophomores are Members of Congress whose first term (in the same chamber at the end of the 116th Congress) was the 116th Congress (freshmen) or 115th (sophomores). Members of Congress who took office within the last few months of a Congress are considered freshmen in the next Congress as well.