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Rep. John Adams

Former Representative for Massachusetts’s 8th District

Adams was the representative for Massachusetts’s 8th congressional district and was a Whig. He served from 1847 to 1849.

He was previously the representative for Massachusetts’s 8th congressional district as a Whig from 1845 to 1847; the representative for Massachusetts’s 8th congressional district as a Whig from 1843 to 1845; the representative for Massachusetts’s 12th congressional district as a Whig from 1839 to 1843; the representative for Massachusetts’s 12th congressional district as a Whig from 1837 to 1839; the representative for Massachusetts’s 12th congressional district as an Anti Masonic from 1835 to 1837; the representative for Massachusetts’s 12th congressional district as an Anti Masonic from 1833 to 1835; the representative for Massachusetts’s 11th congressional district as a Whig from 1831 to 1833; President of the United States as a Democratic-Republican from 1825 to 1829; and a senator from Massachusetts as a Federalist from 1803 to 1809.

Alleged misconduct & resolution

Adams faced an allegation of breaching of privileges of the House by presenting a petition to the House from his constituents regarding dissolution of the Union on January 24, 1842. On Feb. 7, 1842, the House of Representatives tabled the censure resolution, 106-93.

Feb. 7, 1842 House of Representatives tabled the censure resolution, 106-93

Adams faced an allegation of gross disrespect on February 6, 1837 because Adams violated the House "gag rule" on slavery discussions by requesting to present a petition to the House purported to be from slaves. Adams knew a censure resolution would require debate for a vote and thus would provide a way around the gag rule. On Feb. 9, 1837, the House of Representatives withdrew the censure resolution, 21-137.

Feb. 9, 1837 House of Representatives withdrew the censure resolution, 21-137

Adams faced an allegation of committing a breach of the rules of the House by refusing to vote on Stanbery censure after having his application to be excused from the vote rejected on July 11, 1832. On Jul. 12, 1832, the House of Representatives tabled the censure resolution, 89-63.

Jul. 12, 1832 House of Representatives tabled the censure resolution, 89-63
Photo of Rep. John Adams [W-MA8, 1847-1849]

Voting Record

Missed Votes

From Dec 1831 to Feb 1848, Adams missed 615 of 4,762 roll call votes, which is 12.9%. This is better than the median of 24.5% among the lifetime records of representatives serving in Feb 1848. The chart below reports missed votes over time.

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Primary Sources

The information on this page is originally sourced from a variety of materials, including: