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Rep. Newton Gingrich

Former Representative for Georgia’s 6th District

Gingrich was the representative for Georgia’s 6th congressional district and was a Republican. He served from 1979 to 1998.

Misconduct/alleged misconduct

In 1998, the House Committee on Standards of Official Conduct investigated Gingrich for violation of laws governing tax-exempt organizations, improper intervention with government agencies, receipt of improper personal benefits from a PAC and violation of campaign finance rules.

Oct. 10, 1998 House Committee on Standards of Official Conduct member complaint attempting to amend second Jones complaint (Dec. 14, 1995); committee notified members that complaint had to be re-filed (Jan. 25, 1996); new member complaint filed (Jan. 31, 1996) (“Bonior, DeLauro, Lewis, Miller and Schroeder Complaint”); committee referred first allegation to Investigative Subcommittee handling “First Jones Complaint” (Aug. 1, 1996); dismissed second allegation (Sept. 26, 1996); dismissed remaining allegations, letter released publicly

On Jan. 17, 1997, the House Committee on Standards of Official Conduct investigated Gingrich for improper use of official resources in preparation of a college course, conflict of interest, and improper use of tax-exempt entities in support of college course. The investigation was expanded to 1) false statements to the Committee on Standards, 2) his relationship with the foundation/course in violation of foundation’s tax-exempt status under Section 501(c)3 of the IRS Code, 3) his use of unofficial resources for official purposes, and 4) his activities and relationship with another foundation. The committee investigated and dismissed the first two allegations (Gingrich made restitution to pay for the use of the official resources). On Jan. 21, 1997, the House of Representatives reprimanded Gingrich and directed him to reimburse $300,000, 395-28.

Jan. 17, 1997 House Committee on Standards of Official Conduct investigated and dismissed the first two allegations (Gingrich made restitution to pay for the use of the official resources); initiated a preliminary inquiry regarding the third allegation and hired a Special Counsel (Dec. 6, 1995); recommended reprimand and reimbursement of $300,000 to House for investigative expenses, 7-1; filed its report on Jan. 17, 1997 acting as Select committee on Ethics
Jan. 21, 1997 House of Representatives reprimanded and directed to reimburse $300,000, 395-28

In 1996, the House Committee on Standards of Official Conduct investigated Gringrich for improper use of services of volunteer in congressional office via a complaint known as the Third Miller Complaint. The charges were dismissed on Sep. 19, 1996.

Sep. 19, 1996 House Committee on Standards of Official Conduct member complaint filed on behalf of outside organization (Apr. 22, 1996) (“Third Miller Complaint”); dismissed the complaint

On Mar. 29, 1996, the House Committee on Standards of Official Conduct investigated Gingrich for the improper use of the services of a volunteer in congressional offices and concluded that the volunteer service, which had terminated by the time of the complaint, did not comply with the applicable guidelines.

Mar. 29, 1996 House Committee on Standards of Official Conduct concluded that the volunteer service, which had terminated by the time of the complaint, did not comply with the applicable guidelines

In 1995, the House Committee on Standards of Official Conduct investigated Gingrich for improper statements on House floor for political reasons and using official resource for political purposes. The complaints were dismissed in a public letter on Dec. 6, 1995 and a public report issued on Dec. 12, 1995.

Dec. 12, 1995 House Committee on Standards of Official Conduct investigated two member complaints filed (Mar. 8, 1995) and (May 15, 1995)(“Bonior Complaints”); complaints dismissed in a public letter on Dec. 6, 1995 and a public report issued on Dec. 12, 1995

In 1995, the House Committee on Standards of Official Conduct investigated Gingrich for accepting free cable television coverage of college lectures as improper gifts/solicitation. The complaint was dismissed in a public letter on Dec. 6, 1995 and a public report issued on Dec. 12, 1995.

Dec. 12, 1995 House Committee on Standards of Official Conduct member complaint filed (Feb. 23, 1995) (“Schroeder, Johnston and McKinney Complaint”); committee investigated; dismissed the complaint in a public letter on Dec. 6, 1995 and a public report issued on Dec. 12, 1995

In 1995, the House Committee on Standards of Official Conduct investigated Gingrich for improperly using the services of a volunteer for official purposes in a complaint known as the First Miller Complaint. The committee found violations and sent a public letter to Gingrich and took no further action on Dec. 6, 1995. The committee published its report on Dec. 12, 1995.

Dec. 12, 1995 House Committee on Standards of Official Conduct member complaint filed (Feb. 13, 1995)(“First Miller Complaint”); committee investigated; found violations and sent a public letter to Gingrich but took no further action on Dec. 6, 1995; published report on Dec. 12, 1995

In 1995, Gingrich faced the allegations in “First Jones Complaint” plus improper receipt of book royalties for To Renew America, improper book auction, conflict of interest, improper solicitation, improper use of official resources, and improper intervention with federal authorities. On Dec. 6, 1995, the complaint was dismissed. On Dec. 22, 1995, the House of Representatives adopted the committee resolution on restricting advances from book contracts but not subjecting royalty income to outside earned income limit, 259-128.

Dec. 6, 1995 Complaint dismissed.
Dec. 12, 1995 House Committee on Standards of Official Conduct recommended changes regarding book contracts
Dec. 22, 1995 House of Representatives adopted the committee resolution on restricting advances from book contracts but not subjecting royalty income to outside earned income limit, 259-128

In 1990, the House Committee on Standards of Official Conduct investigated Gringrich for using book partnership to avoid outside income limits or to obtain impermissible gifts or contributions, improper use of official resources to prepare book, and inadequate financial disclosure. The committee issued a statement on Mar. 8, 1990.

Mar. 8, 1990 House Committee on Standards of Official Conduct issued statement, 11-0
Photo of Rep. Newton Gingrich [R-GA6, 1979-1998]

Analysis

Ideology–Leadership Chart

Gingrich is shown as a purple triangle in our ideology-leadership chart below. Each dot was a member of the House of Representatives in 1998 positioned according to our liberal–conservative ideology score (left to right) and our leadership score (leaders are toward the top).

The chart is based on the bills Gingrich sponsored and cosponsored. See full analysis methodology.

Enacted Legislation

Gingrich was the primary sponsor of 2 bills that were enacted:

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We consider a bill enacted if one of the following is true: a) it is enacted itself, b) it has a companion bill in the other chamber (as identified by Congress) which was enacted, or c) if at least about half of its provisions were incorporated into bills that were enacted (as determined by an automated text analysis, applicable beginning with bills in the 110th Congress).

Bills Sponsored

Issue Areas

Gingrich sponsored bills primarily in these issue areas:

Government Operations and Politics (29%) Crime and Law Enforcement (16%) Taxation (11%) Families (9%) Economics and Public Finance (9%) Law (9%) International Affairs (9%) Finance and Financial Sector (9%)

Recent Bills

Some of Gingrich’s most recently sponsored bills include...

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Voting Record

Missed Votes

From Jan 1979 to Dec 1998, Gingrich missed 663 of 8,022 roll call votes, which is 8.3%. This is much worse than the median of 2.6% among the lifetime records of representatives serving in Dec 1998. The chart below reports missed votes over time.

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Primary Sources

The information on this page is originally sourced from a variety of materials, including: