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2014 Report Cards: House Freshmen

These statistics dissect the legislative records of Members of Congress during the 113th Congress (Jan 3, 2013-Jan 2, 2015), as of Jan 12, 2015.

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Bills Cosponsored

The number of bills cosponsored by each legislator in the 113th Congress.

House Freshmen
most bills
#1 675 Rep. Matthew Cartwright [D-PA17]
#2 588 Rep. Alan Lowenthal [D-CA47]
... EXPAND ...
#83 1 Rep. Alma Adams [D-NC12]
#84 0 Rep. Donald Norcross [D-NJ1]
fewest bills
 

Bills Introduced

The number of bills each legislator introduced in the 113th Congress.

House Freshmen
most bills
#1 57 Rep. Matthew Cartwright [D-PA17]
#2 32 Rep. Scott Peters [D-CA52]
... EXPAND ...
#82 0 Rep. Alma Adams [D-NC12]
#82 0 Rep. David “Dave” Brat [R-VA7]
#82 0 Rep. Donald Norcross [D-NJ1]
fewest bills
 

Bills Out of Committee

The number of bills that each legislator introduced in the 113th Congress that got past committee and to the floor for consideration. Most bills and resolutions languish in committee without any action.

House Freshmen
most often
#1 6 Sen. Steve Daines [R-MT]
#2 5 Rep. Ann Wagner [R-MO2]
#2 5 Rep. Mark Meadows [R-NC11]
... EXPAND ...
 

Committee Positions

A score, giving five points for each full committee leadership position and one point for each subcommittee leadership position, for each legislator.

House Freshmen
... EXPAND ...
 

Cosponsors

The total number of cosponsors joining the bills written by each legislator in the 113th Congress.

House Freshmen
most cosponsors
#1 1535 Rep. Matthew Cartwright [D-PA17]
#2 615 Rep. Mark Meadows [R-NC11]
... EXPAND ...
 

Government Transparency

GovTrack looked at whether legislators supported any of the government transparency, accountability, and effectiveness bills that we identified in the 113th Congress. We gave a score to each legislator based on one point for cosponsoring and three points for sponsoring any of these bills.

House Freshmen
most often
#1 4 Rep. Kerry Bentivolio [R-MI11, 2013-2014]
#2 2 Rep. Jared Huffman [D-CA2]
#2 2 Rep. Matthew Cartwright [D-PA17]
#2 2 Rep. Scott Peters [D-CA52]
#2 2 Rep. William Enyart [D-IL12, 2013-2014]
... EXPAND ...
 

Ideology Score

Our unique ideology analysis assigns a score to Members of Congress according to their legislative behavior by how similar the pattern of bills and resolutions they cosponsor are to other Members of Congress. The score can be interpreted as a conservative—liberal scale, although of course it only takes into account a small aspect of reality.

House Freshmen
most conservative
#1 0.92 Sen. Tom Cotton [R-AR]
#2 0.90 Rep. Doug LaMalfa [R-CA1]
... EXPAND ...
#83 0.16 Rep. Mark Takano [D-CA41]
#84 0.15 Rep. Mark Pocan [D-WI2]
most liberal

For more, see our methodology. An ideology score is not computed for Members of Congress who introduced fewer than 10 bills or who have a low leadership score, as there is usually not enough data in these cases to compute reliable statistics. Note that because on this page only legislative activity in the 113th Congress is considered, the ideology score here may differ from those elsewhere on GovTrack.

 

Joining Bipartisan Bills

In this era of partisanship, it is encouraging to see Members of Congress working across the aisle. This is the percent of bills cosponsored by each legislator which were introduced by a member of the other party.

House Freshmen
most often
#1 51.9% Rep. Joe Garcia [D-FL26, 2013-2014]
#2 50.2% Sen. Tammy Duckworth [D-IL]
... EXPAND ...
#80 3.4% Rep. Ron DeSantis [R-FL6, 2013-2018]
#81 3.0% Rep. Brad Wenstrup [R-OH2]
least often

Only Democratic and Republican Members of Congress who cosponsored more than 10 bills and resolutions are included in this statistic.

 

Laws Enacted

The number of bills each legislator introduced that became law in the 113th Congress. Keep in mind that it takes a law to repeal a law. Very few bills ever become law.

House Freshmen
... EXPAND ...

A bill or joint resolution is considered enacted if it or an exactly identical bill to it is enacted as law. We only consider bills that the legislator was the primary sponsor of. While a legislator may lay claim to authoring other bills that became law, such as through incorporation into larger bills, these cases are difficult for us to track quantitatively.

 

Leadership Score

Our unique leadership analysis looks at who is cosponsoring whose bills. A higher score shows a greater ability to get cosponsors on bills.

House Freshmen
top leader
#1 0.85 Rep. Mark Meadows [R-NC11]
#2 0.80 Rep. Matthew Cartwright [D-PA17]
... EXPAND ...
#83 0.00 Rep. Vance McAllister [R-LA5, 2013-2014]
#84 0.00 Rep. Brad Wenstrup [R-OH2]
bottom follower

For more, see our methodology. A leadership score is not computed for Members of Congress who introduced fewer than 10 bills, as there is usually not enough data in these cases to compute reliable statistics. Note that because on this page only legislative activity in the 113th Congress is considered, the leadership scores here may differ from those elsewhere on GovTrack.

 

Missed Votes

The percentage of votes each legislator missed in the 113th Congress.

House Freshmen
most absent
#1 15.3% Rep. Gloria Negrete McLeod [D-CA35, 2013-2014]
#2 13.4% Rep. Steven Horsford [D-NV4, 2013-2014]
... EXPAND ...
#82 0.1% Rep. Keith Rothfus [R-PA12]
#82 0.1% Rep. Thomas Massie [R-KY4]
#84 0.0% Rep. David Jolly [R-FL13, 2014-2016]
most present

The Speaker of the House is not included in this statistic because according to current House rules, the Speaker of the House is not required to vote in “ordinary legislative proceedings, and the delegates from the five island territories and the District of Columbia are also not included because they were not elligible to vote in any roll call votes.

 

Powerful Cosponsors

The number of bills that each legislator introduced in the 113th Congress that had a cosponsor who was a chair or ranking member of a committee that the bill was referred to. Getting support from committee leaders on relevant committees is a crucial step in moving legislation forward.

House Freshmen
most often
#1 6 Rep. Matthew Cartwright [D-PA17]
#1 6 Rep. Richard Hudson [R-NC8]
... EXPAND ...
 

Working with the Other Chamber

The House and Senate often work on the same issue simultaneously by introducing companion bills in each chamber. This is the number of bills introduced by each legislator in the 113th Congress that had a companion bill in the other chamber. Working with a sponsor in the other chamber makes a bill more likely to be passed by both the House and Senate.

House Freshmen
most bills
#1 14 Rep. Matthew Cartwright [D-PA17]
#2 6 Rep. Elizabeth Esty [D-CT5]
#2 6 Rep. Steven Horsford [D-NV4, 2013-2014]
#2 6 Sen. Steve Daines [R-MT]
... EXPAND ...

Companion bills are those that are identified as “identical” by Congress’s Congressional Research Service.

 

Writing Bipartisan Bills

In this era of partisanship, it is encouraging to see Members of Congress working across the aisle. This is the percent of bills introduced by each legislator in the 113th Congress which had both a Democratic cosponsor and a Republican cosponsor.

House Freshmen
highest % of bills
#1 68.8% Rep. Rodney Davis [R-IL13]
#2 61.5% Rep. Paul Cook [R-CA8]
#2 61.5% Rep. Richard Hudson [R-NC8]
... EXPAND ...
#35 13.6% Sen. Steve Daines [R-MT]
#36 11.1% Rep. Elizabeth Esty [D-CT5]
lowest % of bills

Only Members of Congress who sponsored more than 10 bills and resolutions are included in this statistic.

Additional Notes

The Speaker’s Votes: Missed votes are not computed for the Speaker of the House. According to current House rules, the Speaker of the House is not required to vote in “ordinary legislative proceedings.” In practice this means the Speaker of the House rarely votes but is not considered absent.

Leadership/Ideology: The leadership and ideology scores are not displayed for Members of Congress who introduced fewer than 10 bills, or, for ideology, for Members of Congress that have a low leadership score, as there is usually not enough data in these cases to compute reliable leadership and ideology statistics.

Missing Bills: We exclude bills from some statistics where the sponsor’s original intent is not in the final bill because the bill’s text was replaced in whole with unrelated provisions (i.e. it became a vehicle for passage of unrelated provisions).

Ranking Members (RkMembs): The chair of a committee is always selected from the political party that holds the most seats in the chamber, called the “majority party”. The “ranking member” (sometimes “RkMembs”) is the title given to the senior-most member of the committee not in the majority party.

Freshmen/Sophomores: Freshmen and sophomores are Members of Congress whose first term (in the same chamber at the end of the 113th Congress) was the 113th Congress (freshmen) or 112th (sophomores). Members of Congress who took office within the last few months of a Congress are considered freshmen in the next Congress as well.