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Rep. Robert Smalls

Former Representative for South Carolina’s 7th District

Smalls was the representative for South Carolina’s 7th congressional district and was a Republican. He served from 1885 to 1887.

He was previously the representative for South Carolina’s 7th congressional district as a Republican from 1883 to 1885; the representative for South Carolina’s 5th congressional district as a Republican from 1881 to 1883; the representative for South Carolina’s 5th congressional district as a Republican from 1877 to 1879; and the representative for South Carolina’s 5th congressional district as a Republican from 1875 to 1877.

Misconduct

Smalls faced an allegation of accepting a bribe while a state legislator in 1872. On Nov. 11, 1877, he was convicted and was sentenced to three years imprisonment, for which he served three days. On Dec. 3, 1877, he was released on bail pending appeal. On Jan. 25, 1878, the House Committee on the Judiciary investigated the circumstances of the conviction and determined that arrest by state authorities for an alleged state crime and detention for trial did not violate any right or privilege of the House. On Apr. 23, 1879, he was pardoned by governor.

Nov. 11, 1877 Convicted and was sentenced to three years imprisonment, for which he served three days.
Dec. 3, 1877 Released on bail pending appeal.
Jan. 25, 1878 House Committee on the Judiciary investigated the circumstances of the conviction and determined that arrest by state authorities for an alleged state crime and detention for trial did not violate any right or privilege of the House.
Apr. 23, 1879 Pardoned by governor.
Photo of Rep. Robert Smalls [R-SC7, 1885-1887]

Voting Record

Missed Votes

From Dec 1875 to Mar 1887, Smalls missed 376 of 1,415 roll call votes, which is 26.6%. This is on par with the median of 28.4% among the lifetime records of representatives serving in Mar 1887. The chart below reports missed votes over time.

Show the numbers...

Primary Sources

The information on this page is originally sourced from a variety of materials, including: