S. 358 (101st): Immigration Act of 1990

This was a vote to pass S. 358 (101st) in the Senate.

The Immigration Act of 1990 (Pub.L. 101–649, 104 Stat. 4978, enacted November 29, 1990) was signed into law by George H. W. Bush on November 29, 1990. It was first introduced by Senator Ted Kennedy in 1989. It was a national reform of the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965. It increased total, overall immigration to allow 700,000 immigrants to come to the U.S. per year for the fiscal years '92–'94, and 675,000 per year after that. It provided family based immigration visa, created five distinct employment based visas, categorized by occupation, as well as the diversity visa program which created a lottery to admit immigrants from "low admittance" countries or countries where their citizenry was underrepresented in the U.S.

Besides these immigrant visas there was also changes in nonimmigrant visas like the H-1B visa for highly skilled workers. There were also cutbacks in the allotment of visas available for extended relatives. The Temporary protected status visa was also created where Congress established a procedure by which the Attorney General may provide TPS to immigrants in the United States who are temporarily unable to safely return to their home country because of ongoing armed conflict, an environmental disaster, or other extraordinary and temporary condition. It specifically benefited citizens of El Salvador.

Other aspects of the act include lifting the English testing process for naturalization which was imposed in the Naturalization Act of 1906 and eliminating the exclusion of homosexuals under the medically unsound classification of "sexual deviant" that was present in the passage of the 1965 Act. George H. W. Bush is quoted in saying "I am also pleased to note that this Act facilitates immigration not just in numerical terms, but also in terms of basic entry rights of those beyond our borders." The administration, therefore, saw the importance of this amendment in extending a welcoming to those previously excluded nations/individuals.

This summary is from Wikipedia.

Congress
101st Congress
Date
Oct 26, 1990
Chamber
Senate
Number
#323
Question:
On the Conference Report in the Senate
Result:
Conference Report Agreed to

Key: D Yea R Yea D Nay R Nay
Seat position based on our ideology score.
Totals     Democrat     Republican
  Yea 89
 
 
89%
51 38
  Nay 8
 
 
8%
3 5
Not Voting 3
 
 
3%
1 2
Required: Simple Majority source: senate.gov

Vote Details

Notes: “Aye” or “Yea”?
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