H.R. 3763 (107th): Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002

This was a vote to pass H.R. 3763 (107th) in the House.

It was not the final House vote on the bill. See the history of H.R. 3763 (107th) for further details.

The Sarbanes–Oxley Act of 2002 (Pub.L. 107–204, 116 Stat. 745, enacted July 30, 2002), also known as the "Public Company Accounting Reform and Investor Protection Act" (in the Senate) and "Corporate and Auditing Accountability and Responsibility Act" (in the House) and more commonly called Sarbanes–Oxley, Sarbox or SOX, is a United States federal law that set new or expanded requirements for all U.S. public company boards, management and public accounting firms. There are also a number of provisions of the Act that also apply to privately held companies, for example the willful destruction of evidence to impede a Federal investigation.

The bill, which contains eleven sections, was enacted as a reaction to a number of major corporate and accounting scandals, including Enron and Worldcom. The sections of the bill cover responsibilities of a public corporation’s board of directors, adds criminal penalties for certain misconduct, and required the Securities and Exchange Commission to create regulations to define how public corporations are to comply with the law.

This summary is from Wikipedia.

Congress
107th Congress
Date
Apr 24, 2002
Chamber
House
Number
#110
Question:
On Passage of the Bill in the House
Result:
Passed

Totals     Republican     Democrat     Independent
  Aye 334
 
 
 
77%
213 119 2
  No 90
 
 
 
21%
2 87 1
Not Voting 10
 
 
 
2%
5 5 0
Required: Simple Majority source: house.gov
Seat position based on our ideology score.

Vote Details

Notes: The Speaker’s Vote? “Aye” or “Yea”?
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Statistically Notable Votes

Statistically notable votes are the votes that are most surprising, or least predictable, given how other members of each voter’s party voted and other factors.

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