H.R. 2419 (110th): Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008

This was a vote to pass H.R. 2419 (110th) in the Senate.

It was not the final Senate vote on the bill. See the history of H.R. 2419 (110th) for further details.

The Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (Pub.L. 110–234, H.R. 2419, 122 Stat. 923, enacted May 22, 2008, also known as the 2008 U.S. Farm Bill) was a $288 billion, five-year agricultural policy bill that was passed into law by the United States Congress on June 18, 2008. The bill was a continuation of the 2002 Farm Bill. It continues the United States' long history of agricultural subsidy as well as pursuing areas such as energy, conservation, nutrition, and rural development. Some specific initiatives in the bill include increases in Food Stamp benefits, increased support for the production of cellulosic ethanol, and money for the research of pests, diseases and other agricultural problems.

On January 1, 2013, Congress passed the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 to avert the fiscal cliff and the next day President Barack Obama signed the Act into law. (Public Law No: 112-240) The "fiscal cliff" deal was primarily enacted to avoid automatic tax hikes and spending cuts, but also included provisions extending portions of the 2008 Farm Bill for nine months through September 30, 2013. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid has demonstrated a commitment to working on a new five-year Farm Bill by reintroducing last session's Senate Farm Bill in the new 113th Congress.

This summary is from Wikipedia.

Congress
110th Congress
Date
Dec 14, 2007
Chamber
Senate
Number
#434
Question:
On Passage of the Bill in the Senate
Result:
Bill Passed

Key: R Yea D Yea R Nay D Nay
Seat position based on our ideology score.
Totals     Republican     Democrat     Independent
  Yea 79
 
 
 
79%
37 40 2
  Nay 14
 
 
 
14%
11 3 0
Not Voting 7
 
 
 
7%
1 6 0
Required: Simple Majority source: senate.gov

Vote Details

Notes: “Aye” or “Yea”?
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