S. 2038 (112th): STOCK Act

This was a vote to pass S. 2038 (112th) in the House. This vote was taken under a House procedure called “suspension of the rules” which is typically used to pass non-controversial bills. Votes under suspension require a 2/3rds majority. A failed vote under suspension can be taken again.

The Stop Trading on Congressional Knowledge Act ("STOCK" Act, Pub.L. 112–105, S. 2038, 126 Stat. 291, enacted April 4, 2012), is an Act of Congress designed to combat insider trading. It was signed into law by President Barack Obama on April 4, 2012. The bill prohibits the use of non-public information for private profit, including insider trading by members of Congress and other government employees. It confirms changes to the Commodity Exchange Act, specifies reporting intervals for financial transactions.

The bill was introduced by United States Senator Joseph Lieberman (I-CT) on January 26, 2012, and passed in the Senate by a 96-3 vote. Later the House of Representatives passed it by a 417-2 vote. The bill was supported heavily by vulnerable incumbents and signed into law by President Obama. According to the current United States Senate Select Committee on Ethics, "A member, officer, or employee of the Senate shall not receive any compensation, nor shall he permit any compensation to accrue to his beneficial interest from any source, the receipt or accrual of which would occur by virtue of influence improperly exerted from his position as a member, officer, or employee"

This summary is from Wikipedia.

112th Congress
Feb 9, 2012
On Motion to Suspend the Rules and Pass, as Amended in the House

Key: R Yea D Yea R Nay
Seat position based on our ideology score.
This is a cartogram. Each hexagon represents one congressional district.
Totals     Republican     Democrat
  Yea 417
232 185
  Nay 2
2 0
Not Voting 14
7 7
Required: 2/3 source: house.gov

Vote Details

Notes: The Speaker’s Vote? “Aye” or “Yea”?
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Statistically Notable Votes

Statistically notable votes are the votes that are most surprising, or least predictable, given how other members of each voter’s party voted and other factors.

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