On the Nomination PN581: Julie Furuta-Toy, of Wyoming, to be Ambassador to the Republic of Equatorial Guinea

The Senate approved President Obama’s nomination of Julie Furuta-Toy to be Ambassador to Equatorial Guinea, in West Africa. Furuta-Toy is a career member of the Department of State who had been acting ambassador to Norway for nearly two years until earlier this year. Prior to serving in Norway, she was Deputy Chief of Mission at the embassy in Ghana, also in West Africa.

The nomination was approved unanimously.

As a somewhat light-hearted indication of her international experience, Furuta-Toy introduced her son Eliot during her testimony to the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and said, “He was born during my first tour in the Foreign Service 27 years ago in Manila, the Philippines.”

But Furuta-Toy quickly moved to presenting her overall credentials in Foreign Relations, which she said have included working in “Haiti, India, Russia, Ghana, and Norway.” She continued, “Such a disparate group of countries has demonstrated to me similarly disparate attitudes towards rule of law, good governance, and transparency.”

In Ghana, for example, “I am proud to have implemented U.S. policy focused on reducing and eliminating the worst forms of child labor and trafficking in persons,” said Furuta-Toy.

According to the State Department’s report to the Senate committee, Furuta-Toy’s skills include “outstanding leadership, strong interpersonal and team-building skills, as well as expertise in administering development programs and doing consular work.”



Congress
114th Congress
Date
Oct 22, 2015
Chamber
Senate
Number
#283
Result:
Nomination Confirmed

Key: R Yea D Yea
Seat position based on our ideology score.
Totals     Republican     Democrat     Independent
  Yea 93
 
 
 
93%
48 43 2
  Nay 0
 
 
 
0%
0 0 0
Not Voting 7
 
 
 
7%
6 1 0
Required: Simple Majority source: senate.gov

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Notes: “Aye” or “Yea”?
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