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H.R. 1039: Probation Officer Protection Act of 2017

This was a vote to pass H.R. 1039 in the House.

H.R. 1039 amends the federal criminal code to authorize a probation officer to arrest a person, without warrant, if there is probable cause to believe that person forcibly assaulted or obstructed a probation officer while performing their official duties. The bill also would direct the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts (AOUSC) to implement rules and regulations governing probation officers’ conduct while exercising that authority.

Although obstructing a probation officer in the performance of his or her official duties is illegal, when a probation officer encounters an uncooperative or violent third party, the officer may be forced to retreat because he or she lacks authority to restrain the third party. This lack of authority and resulting need to retreat, rather than restrain the third party, exposes probation officers to greater risk of harm and allows the third party to elude capture. As a result, evidence that an offender has violated a condition of his or her probation or supervised release, or evidence of other criminal activity, may be lost.

Source: Republican Policy Committee


Congress
115th Congress
Date
May 19, 2017
Chamber
House
Number
#268
Question:
On Passage of the Bill in the House
Result:
Passed

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Key: R Yea D Yea R Nay D Nay
Seat position based on our ideology score.
This is a cartogram. Each hexagon represents one congressional district.
Totals     Republican     Democrat
  Yea 229
 
 
53%
192 37
  Nay 177
 
 
41%
33 144
Not Voting 24
 
 
6%
12 12
Required: Simple Majority source: house.gov

Vote Details

Notes: The Speaker’s Vote? “Aye” or “Yea”?
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Statistically Notable Votes

Statistically notable votes are the votes that are most surprising, or least predictable, given how other members of each voter’s party voted and other factors.

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