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H.R. 5: Regulatory Accountability Act of 2017

Jan 11, 2017 at 6:46 p.m. ET. On Passage of the Bill in the House.

This was a vote to pass H.R. 5 (115th) in the House.

H.R. 5 combines six previously passed bills to eliminate what bill sponsors call overly burdensome red tape and regulation. Major provisions of the legislation include:

Title I which requires agencies to choose the lowest-cost rulemaking alternative that meets statutory objectives and requires greater opportunity for public input and vetting of critical information.

Title II which repeals the Chevron and Auer doctrines to end judicial deference to bureaucrats’ statutory and regulatory interpretations.

Title III which requires agencies to account for the direct, indirect, and cumulative impacts of new regulations on small businesses and find flexible ways to reduce them. Specifically, the title amends the Regulatory Flexibility Act (RFA) and the Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act (SBREFA) to ensure agencies adequately analyze proposed rules for their potential impacts on small businesses.

Title IV which amends the Administrative Procedure Act to require federal agencies to postpone the implementation of any rule imposing an annual cost on the economy of more than $1 billion (classified as a “high-impact” rule) if a petition seeking judicial review of that regulation is filed within the statutorily provided time for challenging the rule’s issuance (or a default period of 60 days). Under the bill, implementation would be postponed until any judicial review is resolved.

Title V which requires federal agencies to submit monthly regulatory updates to the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) for all rules expected to be proposed or released in the upcoming year. The bill requires that most regulations must be published in such reports at least six months before becoming effective.

Title VI which requires agencies to post on the regulations.gov website an abbreviated summary of proposed rules. Summaries would be required to be no more than 100 words in length.

Source: Republican Policy Committee

Totals

All Votes R D
Yea 57%
 
 
238
233
 
5
 
Nay 43%
 
 
183
0
 
183
 
Not Voting
 
 
13
7
 
6
 

Passed. Simple Majority Required. Source: house.gov.

Ideology Vote Chart

Key:
Republican - Yea Democrat - Yea Democrat - Nay
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