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H.R. 1638: Iranian Leadership Asset Transparency Act

Dec 13, 2017 at 5:26 p.m. ET. On Passage of the Bill in the House.

This was a vote to pass H.R. 1638 (115th) in the House.

H.R. 1638 requires the Department of Treasury to provide a report to help further efforts to prevent the financing of terrorism, money laundering, or related illicit finance and to help clarify for financial institutions and legitimate businesses ways they can comply with remaining sanctions. The legislation requires the Department of the Treasury to provide the report to the  Committees on Financial Services and Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives and the Committees on Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs and Foreign Relations of the Senate

Specifically the report must include information on:

  • Funds or assets held in U.S. and foreign financial institutions that are directly or indirectly controlled by specified Iranian officials;
  • Any equity stake such officials have in an entity on Treasury’s list of Specially Designated Nationals or in any other sanctioned entity;
  • How such funds, assets, or equity interests were acquired and for what purpose they have been or might be used;
  • New methods used to evade anti-money laundering and related laws, including recommendations to improve techniques to combat illicit uses of the U.S. financial system by each such official;
  • Recommendations for revising U.S. economic sanctions against Iran to prevent Iranian officials from using funds or assets to develop and procure ballistic missile technology;
  • How Treasury assesses the effectiveness of U.S. economic sanctions against Iran; and
  • Recommendations for improving Treasury’s ability to develop and enforce additional economic sanctions against Iran if so ordered by the President.

The Treasury Department must submit the report within 270 days of the legislation’s enactment and then annually for the following two years. An unclassified portion of the report should be made available to the public and posted on the Treasury’s website in English, Farsi, Arabic, and Azeri versions.

Source: Republican Policy Committee

Totals

All Votes R D
Yea 68%
 
 
289
233
 
56
 
Nay 32%
 
 
135
3
 
132
 
Not Voting
 
 
7
2
 
5
 

Passed. Simple Majority Required. Source: house.gov.

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