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H.R. 4910: Veterans Cemetery Benefit Correction Act

This was a vote to pass H.R. 4910 in the House. This vote was taken under a House procedure called “suspension of the rules” which is typically used to pass non-controversial bills. Votes under suspension require a 2/3rds majority. A failed vote under suspension can be taken again.

H.R. 4910, as amended, would require the Department of the Interior to provide outer burial receptacles for veterans remains buried in open cemeteries under National Park Service control. The bill ensures that the use of outer burial receptacles in such cemeteries will be in accordance with regulations or procedures approved by VA or the Department of the Army.

Current law requires the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to provide an outer burial receptacle to a veteran buried in a national cemetery under the control of the National Cemetery Administration, a branch of the VA. Additionally, the VA can provide a reimbursement if the family chooses to purchase one in lieu of a government-furnished grave liner. National Park Service (NPS)-managed cemeteries; however, are not currently covered by this statute and neither the VA nor the NPS is able provide this benefit for veterans buried in those cemeteries. Of the 14 national cemeteries controlled by the NPS, two are still active: Andersonville National Cemetery in Georgia and Andrew Johnson National Cemetery in Tennessee.

Source: Republican Policy Committee

Totals

All Votes R D
Yea 91%
 
 
388
218
 
170
 
Nay 0%
 
 
0
0
 
0
 
Not Voting 9%
 
 
39
16
 
23
 

Date: May 7, 2018

Question: On Motion to Suspend the Rules and Pass, as Amended in the House

Required: 2/3

Result: Passed

Source: house.gov

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Key: R Yea D Yea
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Vote Details

Notes: The Speaker’s Vote? “Aye” or “Yea”?
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Statistically Notable Votes

Statistically notable votes are the votes that are most surprising, or least predictable, given how other members of each voter’s party voted and other factors.

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