skip to main content

H.R. 133: Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 [Including Coronavirus Stimulus & Relief]

Dec 21, 2020 at 8:25 p.m. ET. On Concurring in Senate Amdt with Portion of Amdt Comprising of Divisions B, C, E, and F in the House.

This was a vote to pass H.R. 133 (116th) in the House.

It was not the final House vote on the bill. See the history of H.R. 133 (116th) for further details.

This bill became the vehicle for passage of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021, a major government funding bill, which also included economic stimulus provisions due to the coronavirus pandemic.

The bill passed overwhelmingly and with bipartisan support in the House through two roll call votes on Dec. 21, 2020. The first vote was on the portion of the bill for the appropriations for some federal departments including Commerce, Justice, Defense, Treasury, and Homeland Security, and some federal components including the White House and the District of Columbia. The second vote was on the remaining portion of the bill, which included appropriations for the remainder of the federal government as well as coronavirus stimulus and relief and many other miscellaneous provisions. It also passed the Senate overwhelmingly late that night.

According to our analysis, this bill is the fifth longest bill to be passed by Congress in the history of the country. Consequently, a more detailed summary is not easily possible. More details can be found in the House Rules Committee Joint Explanatory Statements.

This bill was originally introduced as the United States-Mexico Economic Partnership Act. That text passed the House and Senate in late 2019 and early 2020 (but in non-identical forms). In December 2020, the text of the bill was replaced with the omnibus appropriations and coronavirus relief bill. The original United States-Mexico Economic Partnership Act text was retained in Title XIX and passed along with the rest of the revised bill.

Totals

All Votes D R L I
Yea 79%
 
 
 
 
327
192
 
134
 
0
 
1
 
Nay 21%
 
 
 
 
85
41
 
43
 
1
 
0
 
Not Voting
 
 
 
 
18
0
 
18
 
0
 
0
 

Passed. Simple Majority Required. Source: house.gov.

Ideology Vote Chart

Key:
Democrat - Yea Republican - Yea Democrat - Nay Republican - Nay
Seat position based on our ideology score.

Cartogram Map

Each hexagon represents one congressional district. Solid hexes are Yea votes.

What you can do

Vote Details

Notes: The Speaker’s Vote? “Aye” or “Yea”?
Download as CSV

Statistically Notable Votes

Statistically notable votes are the votes that are most surprising, or least predictable, given how other members of each voter’s party voted and other factors.

All Votes

Study Guide

How well do you understand this vote? Use this study guide to find out.

You can find answers to most of the questions below here on the vote page. For a guide to understanding the bill this vote was about, see here.

What was the procedure for this vote?

  1. What was this vote on?
  2. Not all votes are meant to pass legislation. In the Senate some votes are not about legislation at all, since the Senate must vote to confirm presidential nominations to certain federal positions.

    This vote is related to a bill. However, that doesn’t necessarily tell you what it is about. Congress makes many decisions in the process of passing legislation, such as on the procedures for debating the bill, whether to change the bill before voting on passage, and even whether to vote on passage at all.

    You can learn more about the various motions used in Congress at EveryCRSReport.com. If you aren’t sure what the House was voting on, try seeing if it’s on this list.

  3. What is the next step after this vote?
  4. Take a look at where this bill is in the legislative process. What might come next? Keep in mind what this specific vote was on, and the context of the bill. Will there be amendments? Will the other chamber of Congress vote on it, or let it die?

    For this question it may help to briefly examine the bill itself.

What is your analysis of this vote?

  1. What trends do you see in this vote?
  2. Members of Congress side together for many reasons beside being in the same political party, especially so for less prominent legislation or legislation specific to a certain region. What might have determined how the roll call came out in this case? Does it look like Members of Congress voted based on party, geography, or some other reason?

    One tool that will be helpful in answering this question is the cartogram at the top of the page. A cartogram is a stylized map of the United States that shows each district as an identical hexagon. This view allows you to see the how the representatives from each district voted arranged by their geography and colored by their political party. What trends can you see in the cartogram for this vote?

  3. How did your representative vote?
  4. There is one vote here that should be more important to you than all the others. These are the votes cast by your representative, which is meant to represent you and your community. Do you agree with how your representative voted? Why do you think they voted the way they did?

    If you don’t already know who your Members of Congress are you can find them by entering your address here.

Each vote’s study guide is a little different — we automatically choose which questions to include based on the information we have available about the vote. Study guides are a new feature to GovTrack. You can help us improve them by filling out this survey or by sending your feedback to hello@govtrack.us.