TO ADOPT HR 5484, THE ANTI-DRUG ABUSE ACT. THE BILL WOULD STRENGTHEN FEDERAL EFFORTS TO ENCOURAGE FOREIGN COOPERATION IN ERADICATING ILLICIT DRUG CROPS AND IN HALTING INTERNATIONAL DRUG TRAFFIC, WOULD IMPROVE ENFORCEMENT OF FEDERAL DRUG LAWS AND ENHANCE INTERDICTION OF ILLICIT DRUG SHIPMENTS, WOULD PROVIDE STRONG FEDERAL LEADERSHIP IN ESTABLISHING EFFECTIVE DRUG ABUSE PREVENTION AND EDUCATION PROGRAMS, AND WOULD EXPAND FEDERAL SUPPORT FOR DRUG ABUSE TREATMENT AND REHABILITATION EFFORTS. AS AMENDED BY THE SENATE, THE BILL ALSO INCLUDED SEVERAL UNRELATED PROVISIONS AMONG THEM A REALLOCATION OF CERTAIN U.S. SUGAR QUOTAS, AN EXTENSION OF FEDERAL WELFARE AND HEALTH PROGRAMS TO THE HOMELESS, A PROHIBITION ON "DIAL-A-PORN" OPERATIONS, A REQUIREMENT FOR QUALITY CONTROL TESTING OF INFANT FORMULA, ESTABLISHMENT OF MINIMUM STANDAARDS FOR THE LICENSING OF BUS DRIVERS AND COMMERCIAL TRUCKERS, AN EXTENSION OF PRIVACY PROTECTIONS TO ELECTRONIC COMMUNICATIONS, AND A BAN ON THE MANUFACTURE, SALE, OR POSSESSION OF BALLISTIC KNIVES.

Date:

Sep 30, 1986

Number:

Senate Vote #683
99th Congress

Result:

unknown

Source:

Professor Keith Poole

Totals     Republican     Democrat
  Yea 97
 
 
97%
51 46
  Nay 2
 
 
2%
1 1
Not Voting 1
 
 
1%
1 0
Required: unknown

Vote Details

Notes: Accuracy of Historical Records

Our database of roll call votes from 1789-1989 (1990 for House votes) comes from an academic data source, VoteView.com, that has digitized paper records going back more than 200 years. Because of the difficulty of this task, the accuracy of these vote records is reduced..

In particular, these records do not distinguish between Members of Congress not voting (abstaining) from Members of Congress who were not eligible to vote because they had not yet taken office, or for other reasons. As a result, you may see Senate votes with more than 100 senators listed! But, typically, the extra senators will be listed as not voting.

“Aye” or “Yea”?

“Aye” and “Yea” mean the same thing, and so do “No” and “Nay”. Congress uses different words in different sorts of votes.

The U.S. Constitution says that bills should be decided on by the “yeas and nays” (Article I, Section 7). Congress takes this literally and uses “yea” and “nay” when voting on the final passage of bills.

All Senate votes use these words. But the House of Representatives uses “Aye” and “No” in other sorts of votes.